Posts in Category "Type"

CMap Resources & Character Collections

The CMap resources that are associated with our public glyph sets—called character collections—were first open-sourced on 2009-09-21 via Adobe’s first open source portal, and about a year later the project was moved to SourceForge. I then migrated the project to GitHub on 2015-03-27 where it is likely to remain for the foreseeable future. The main purpose for open-sourcing our CMap resources was to make it easier for developers to include them in their own open source projects, many of which require that the components themselves be open source.

I then open-sourced three of our four character collections on GitHub—Adobe-GB1-5, Adobe-CNS1-7, and Adobe-Japan1-6—in October of last year. The Adobe-Korea1-2 character collection was intentionally not open-sourced, because it will soon be replaced by the Adobe-KR-9 character collection that is expected to be published in mid-May.
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Adobe-KR-9 Fourth Draft

This article picks up where the 2018-01-18 article left off, and provides details about the fourth—and hopefully final—draft of the forthcoming Adobe-KR-9 character collection that was issued today.

The fourth draft of the Adobe-KR-9 character collection includes 22,860 glyphs (CIDs 0 through 22859) distributed among ten Supplements. When compared to the third draft, four glyphs were removed, only one glyph was added, a small number of glyphs were moved from Supplement 0 to later Supplements, and the ordering of Supplements 3 through 9 was changed. Because it is a draft, the details are still subject to change, though my hope is that this draft represents what will become the final character collection specification.
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Adobe-KR-9 Third Draft

This article picks up where the 2017-12-19 article left off, and provides details about the third draft of the forthcoming Adobe-KR-9 character collection that was issued today.

The third draft of the Adobe-KR-9 character collection includes 22,863 glyphs (CIDs 0 through 22862) distributed among ten Supplements. When compared to the second draft, three glyphs were removed, 254 glyphs were added, and the distribution of glyphs among some of the Supplements was changed. Because it is a draft, the details are still subject to change, though I suspect that any changes will be minimal at this point.
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Adobe-KR-9 Second Draft

This article picks up where the 2017-10-01 article left off, and provides details about the second draft of the forthcoming Adobe-KR-9 character collection that was issued today.

The second draft of the Adobe-KR-9 character collection includes 22,612 glyphs (CIDs 0 through 22611) distributed among ten Supplements. When compared to the first draft, 35 glyphs were removed, ten glyphs were added, three Supplements were added, and the distribution of glyphs among some of the Supplements was changed. Because it is the second draft, the details are still subject to change—and most certainly will change, though I hope that the changes are minimal.
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(この記事中の貂の写真はすべて Adobe Stock で見つけることができます)

English (英語) here

この記事の目的は、Typekit から提供される「明朝」(Ten Mincho) の書体とフォント開発について技術的詳細を説明することにあります。貂明朝は、これまでどんな日本語フォントも到達しなかった領域に足を踏み入れました。貂明朝の書体デザインについての詳細については、Typekit Blog 上の公式アナウンスメント (英語) の方をご覧ください。この長文の技術的な記事よりも、そちらの方に興味を持たれるかもしれません。公式アナウンスメントに述べられているように、この新しい Adobe Originals の和文書体にはユニークな特長が数多くあります。そのため、日本や各国の書体メーカー、タイプデザイナーの方々はこの書体からインスピレーションを受けられることでしょう。

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Ten Mincho: To Boldly Go Where No Font Has Gone Before

(All of the marten photos that are used in this article can be found on Adobe Stock)

日本語 (Japanese) はこちら

The purpose of this article is to provide technical details of how the Ten Mincho明朝 in Japanese—typeface and its fonts, which are initially being offered as a Typekit exclusive, were developed, and how they boldly go where no Japanese font has gone before. For more details about the Ten Mincho typeface design itself, which is probably much more interesting than this really long and technical article, I encourage you to read the official announcement (日本語) on the Typekit Blog. As stated in the official announcement, this new Adobe Originals Japanese typeface is unique in many ways, and should serve as inspiration for type foundries and typeface designers in Japan and elsewhere.

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OpenType SVG Fonts in Creative Cloud Apps

Today’s article provides useful details for our relatively small number of customers who author documents with our flagship Creative Cloud apps and make use of CID-keyed OpenType SVG fonts. A rather broadly-deployed CID-keyed OpenType SVG typeface is the open source Source Han Code JP family, whose development details are described in the very first section of this article.

While it is fully possible to build OpenType fonts—CID-keyed or otherwise—that include an 'SVG ' (Scalable Vector Graphics) table, the infrastructure to support them in apps is still maturing. That is the purpose of this article, so please continue reading if the details interest or otherwise affect you.
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Three Down, One To Go…

Earlier this month, I decided to move the Adobe-Japan1-6 character collection specification to the Adobe Type Tools organization on GitHub, which was partly motivated by constantly-changing URLs on our Font Technical Notes page. Another motivation was to make the specification itself easier to maintain. At some point, I will be adding a more complete list of Supplement 7 (aka Adobe-Japan1-7) candidates to its wiki.

To this end, I decided to do the same for the Adobe-CNS1-7 and Adobe-GB1-5 character collection specifications while on vacation in South Dakota. For the former, I also used the opportunity to update the specification to include Supplement 7 (aka Adobe-CNS1-7), by adding its representative glyphs and other details.

So, that’s three down, and one to go.
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Adobe-Japan1-6 on GitHub

This is a very brief article whose purpose is to simply state that—due to recent events beyond my control*—the Adobe-Japan1-6 character collection specification is now an open source project that is hosted on GitHub as a new repository in the Adobe Type Tools organization.

Most of my morning was consumed by porting the original text from Adobe InDesign to GitHub-flavored Markdown, and, while I was touching the text, I decided to seize the opportunity to make several corrections and updates. The 500-glyphs-per-page representative glyph charts are now in a separate PDF file. I also used the opportunity to update the aj16-kanji.txt datafile, and also added the latest-and-greatest Adobe-Japan1-6 UVS (Unicode Variation Sequence) definition file. All good stuff, I think.



* Adobe’s IT folks apparently felt compelled to (once again) change the URLs for all of the font-related Adobe Tech Notes, including Adobe Tech Note #5078 (The Adobe-Japan1-6 Character Collection). Its URL is somewhat broadly referenced, including in the IVD_Collection.txt file of the latest version of the IVD (Ideographic Variation Database). The bottom line is that I needed a stable URL.

A Forthcoming Registry & Ordering: Adobe-KR-6

It is difficult to imagine that it has been over 20 years since a new RO—or Adobe CID-keyed glyph set—was born. Of course, I am referring to the static glyph sets, not the ones based on the special-purpose Adobe-Identity-0 ROS.

“RO” stands for Registry and Ordering, which represent compatibility names or identifiers for CID-keyed glyph sets that are referred to as character collections. Adobe CID-keyed glyph sets are usually referred to as ROSes, with the final “S” being an integer that refers to a specific Supplement. The first Supplement, of course, is 0 (zero).

One of my recent projects is to revitalize and modernize our Korean glyph set, Adobe-Korea1-2 (see Adobe Tech Note #5093), which was last modified on 1998-10-12 by defining Supplement 2 that added only pre-rotated versions of the proportional and half-width glyphs that are referenced by the effectively-deprecated 'vrt2' (Vertical Alternates and Rotation) GSUB feature. Instead of defining a new Supplement, I decided that it would be better to simply define a completely new glyph set for a variety of reasons. The tentative Registry and Ordering names are Adobe and KR (meaning “Adobe-KR”), and unlike other ROSes for which Supplements are defined incrementally, my current plan is to simultaneously define seven Supplements, 0 through 6.
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Source Han Unicode

One of my hobbies is apparently to explore various ways to stress-test Adobe products, and the target of today’s article happens to be recent adventures with Adobe InDesign and our Source Han families.

The background is that I produced Unicode-based glyph synopses as part of the Source Han Sans and Source Han Serif releases, but those PDFs show only up to 256 code points per page, and it takes several hundred pages to show their complete Unicode coverage. I also produced single-page PDFs that show all 65,535 glyphs. A Source Han Sans one is available here, and a Source Han Serif one is available here. However, they are not Unicode-based.
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Three Multiple-Family Super OTCs

To take the previous article further—and because I tend to have an urge to stress-test environments—I added two more Super OTCs to the Source Han Super OTC open source project this morning.
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Introducing Source Han Super OTC

The release of Source Han Serif earlier this month, on 2017-04-03, gave me an opportunity to build yet another resource for stress-testing environments, particularly those that consume OpenType/CFF Collections. (This also continues to simplify file management by combining three Super OTCs into a much larger one.)
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April 11, 2017—Another Date Which Will Live In Dignity

Early last August, I celebrated the release of Microsoft’s Windows 10 Anniversary Update (Version 1607, and also known as Redstone 1 or RS1), mainly because it represented the very first version of Windows OS to support OpenType/CFF Collections (aka OTCs). Alas, my favorite Source Han Sans—and now Source Han Serif—deployment format, the Super OTC that packs all of the fonts into a single and easy-to-manage font resource, could not be installed.
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Adobe InDesign Tips: Japanese/CJK Functionality + English UI

It seems that not a day goes by that I am not using Adobe InDesign CC.

It is my preferred document-authoring app, whether I am preparing a relatively simple single-page document or one that is much longer and complex.
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Designing & Implementing Biáng

Besides being the world’s first open source serif-style Pan-CJK typeface families, the Adobe-branded Source Han Serif and the Google-branded Noto Serif CJK also represent the first broad deployment of two highly-complex and related ideographs that are in the process of being encoded. Their glyphs are shown above in all seven weights. Although it may be hard to believe, the fourth line illustrates the simplified version.
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Source Han Serif / Noto Serif CJK History & Development

Or, perhaps more accurately, the project that has been keeping me busy for the past couple of years.

The Adobe-branded Source Han Serif (named 源ノ明朝 in Japanese, 본명조 in Korean, 思源宋体 in Simplified Chinese, and 思源宋體 in Traditional Chinese) and Google-branded Noto Serif CJK open source Pan-CJK typeface families, which represent the serif-style counterparts to the similarly-named and also open source Source Han Sans and Noto Sans CJK Pan-CJK typeface families, were released on 2017-04-03. You can read more about the Source Han Serif release here (日本語한국어简体中文繁體中文), which includes a six-minute promotional video.

This article provides information that you would not expect to find in the official announcements for Source Han Serif or Noto Serif CJK, mainly because such information is intended for a completely different audience, which is primarily comprised of font developers.

Unless noted otherwise, all further references to Source Han Serif or Source Han Sans will apply to Noto Serif CJK or Noto Sans CJK, respectively.
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I will open this article by stating that OpenType features are almost always GSUB (Glyph SUBstitution) or GPOS (Glyph POSitioning). The former table specifies features that substitute glyphs with other glyphs, usually in a 1:1 fashion, but not always. The latter table specifies features that alter the metrics of glyphs, or the inter-glyph metrics (aka kerning).

The focus of this particular article will be the 'vert' (Vertical Alternates) feature, which substitutes a glyph with the appropriate glyph for vertical writing, and is invoked when in vertical writing mode. In other words, it’s a GSUB feature, and one that needs to be invoked for proper vertical writing. Current implementations that support the 'vert' GSUB feature, which tend to be CJK fonts, substitute glyphs with their vertical forms on a 1:1 basis, though language-tagging may affect the outcome for Pan-CJK fonts, such as the Adobe-branded Source Han Sans and the Google-branded Noto Sans CJK, which support multiple languages.
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Year of the Rooster

It is now January 28, 2017 in China and other Chinese-speaking regions.

I’d like to use this opportunity to welcome the Year of the Rooster, and to wish a Chinese New Year to all of my Chinese friends, colleagues, and blog readers. May this year be safe, prosperous, and enjoyable.
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The Tale of U+27BF & Adobe-Japan1-6 CID+20958

As recorded on the very first page of Adobe Tech Note #5078, Adobe-Japan1-6 was released on 2004-03-05, and one of the glyphs that was added was CID+20958. According to the Adobe-Japan1-6 ordering file, its glyph name is freedial, and is assigned to the Dingbats FDArray element for the purpose of hinting. Of course, if you look for CID+20958 in Adobe Tech Note #5078, you can find it on the bottom of page 54, immediately to the right of CID+20957 that maps from U+26BD ⚽ SOCCER BALL, though it is blank. This is simply because Adobe does not have the rights to use NTT’s trademarked FreeDial mark. CID+20958 was included in Adobe-Japan1-6 for the benefit of font developers who do have the rights to use this mark, and can thus include the glyph in their fonts.
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