Author Archive: kstone

Using Assembler IVS to Test DDX Expressions

The LiveCycle ES Update 1 (8.2) installation includes Assembler IVS, which is a great tool for testing DDX expressions without having to modify a Workbench ES process. The tool also includes some nice examples that illustrate different DDX concepts such as assembling a document, disassembling a document by bookmarks and pages, and converting a PDF document to PDF/A.

Assembler IVS is also a good way to validate your installation as described in the blog entry
Validating a LiveCycle Install posted on the LiveCycle Product Blog. In fact, IVS is an acronym for Installation Verification Sample.

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Using Assembler to Create PDF Portfolios (PDF Packages)

You can use the Assembler service to combine multiple documents into a PDF Portfolio that specifies how a viewer application’s user interface presents collections of file attachments. When your process or application invokes Assembler, it provides a Document Description XML (DDX) that describes the PDF Portfolio you want to produce. This article describes different types of PDF Portfolios and the DDX expressions you can use to produce them.

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PDF Packages vs. PDF Portfolios

This article is included in the LiveCycle Documentation blog because it establishes a foundation that will make it easier to understand LiveCycle features related to PDF Packages and PDF Portfolios.

In 2006, the PDF specification added support for document collections, which provide information that PDF viewing applications can use for navigating the files attached to a PDF document. Since then, Adobe® Reader® and Adobe Acrobat® have used the terms PDF Packages and PDF Portfolios to describe these collections. This article explains the history of these terms, and it describes the Acrobat user interface that makes PDF Packages and PDF Portfolios so dynamic.

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Certifying PDF Portfolios

With Adobe LiveCycle ES, you can certify PDF Portfolios to ensure that none of the documents contained within the portfolios are changed without being detected. Additionally, you can encrypt or policy protect PDF Portfolios and the files they contain, and you can apply usage rights to PDF Portfolios.

This article discusses limitations in the types of files you can include in certified PDF Portfolio and the order in which you must apply LiveCycle ES services when creating certified PFD Portfolios.

For definitions of the terms used in this article, see PDF Packages vs. PDF Portfolios located in the LiveCycle Doc Team blog (this blog).

The cover sheet in a certified PDF Portfolio can be an interactive form; however, the files contained in the portfolio must not be interactive. The certification for a PDF Portfolio becomes compromised if any of the component files are modified, even if the component file’s certification allows form fill-in.

To create a certified PDF Portfolio, apply operations in the following order. These services must be invoked within a short-lived process.

  1. (Optional) For each document to be contained in the PDF Portfolio, encrypt or policy protect, and then certify. The files in the PDF Portfolio cannot be interactive forms, so you must not apply Usage Rights.
  2. Assemble the PDF Portfolio.
  3. (Optional) Encrypt or policy protect the PDF Portfolio.
  4. Certify the PDF Portfolio.
  5. Apply Usage Rights to the PDF Portfolio.

You can also create a process that consumes component files that are already encrypted, policy-protected, or certified. In this case, the order for applying services is still the same as above with the omission of the first step. If any of the component files consumed by your process are encrypted or policy-protected, ensure your DDX file defines them in a way that avoids the Assembler service having to open them. You can accomplish this goal by defining the component files using the <PackageFiles> source element, not the <PackageFiles> filter element. For example, the following DDX produces a PDF Portfolio without requiring Assembler ES to open the component files:


<DDX xmlns="http://ns.adobe.com/DDX/1.0/">
<PDF result="outDoc" >
<PDF source="_AdobeCoverSheet" bookmarkTitle="Cover"/>
<PackageFiles source="doc1" required="false">
<File filename="MyFirstFile.pdf" mimetype="application/pdf"/>
</PackageFiles>
<PackageFiles source="doc2" required="false">
<File filename="MySecondFile.txt" mimetype="text/plain"/>
</PackageFiles>
</PDF>
</DDX>

Any of the following changes would compromise a certified PDF Portfolio:

  • Component files are modified
  • Component files are filled in, even if the component file’s certification allows form fill-in
  • Cover page is modified, unless the certificate allows form fill-in

Information about all of the DDX elements that are discussed in this posting can be found in DDX Reference.

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Configuring Rights Management ES Client Access

Adobe’s LiveCycle Rights Management ES solution has been in the market since the beginning of 2005 and, as of our LiveCycle ES Update 1 release this past summer, can be used to protect a growing variety of file formats – PDF, Office, CAD, and FLV. The server works together with Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Reader clients to protect, view, and manage sensitive PDF documents. Because support is included in every copy of Acrobat and Reader 7.x, 8.x, and 9.x, we have more than 700 million machines world-wide that are capable of receiving protected PDF documents with absolutely no configuration required or any special software to be deployed.

We give you the option to allow documents to be viewed on any of these clients out of the box, but understand that in certain cases you might wish to restrict clients to the latest version. For example, there may be cases where you want to take advantage of newly introduced functionality, such as the new AES-256bit encryption algorithms introduced earlier this year.

As such, we now allow you to configure each deployed server to restrict which client versions or applications the server may communicate with. Technical details can be found at http://www.adobe.com/devnet/livecycle/articles/deny_services.html.

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