Posts in Category "Designer"

LiveCycle ES2 Service Pack 1 available!

We recently released LiveCycle ES2 Service Pack 1 (SP1), a significant update to the LiveCycle server components, LiveCycle Workbench ES2, and LiveCycle Designer ES2. You can access the download page here. To download the service pack, you’ll need to log in using your Adobe ID and agree with the EULA.

The updated LiveCycle ES2 SP1 documentation is now live at the LiveCycle Developer Center. The SP1 ReadMe (PDF) describes how you can install the service pack for LiveCycle ES2 server, Workbench ES2, and Designer ES2. The ReadMe also lists the 80+ customer-reported issues that were addressed in this service pack.

To review the SP1 release notes for LiveCycle components, see this page. A related announcement on the LiveCycle Product Blog is here.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Accessibility Checker for LiveCycle Designer

If you are creating accessible PDF forms, you can now use an Accessibilty Checker to test them to see how well they enable accessibility according to the guidelines for accessible forms. For more information, see here.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Creating an optional section in an interactive PDF form

LiveCycle Designer ES2 introduced the Action Builder feature. Using Action Builder, you can create interactive capabilities in PDF forms, even if you don’t know how to write scripts.

One of the most common uses of Action Builder is to create an optional section in an interactive PDF form, which appears in the form only when the form filler selects a related option.

For more information, see LiveCycle Designer ES2: Create an optional section in an interactive form

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

LiveCycle Designer ES2: Selecting multiple XDP files in Open dialog box may cause LiveCycle Designer ES2 to crash

If you select more than one XDP file in the Open dialog box, LiveCycle Designer ES2 may crash. Certain third party applications add capabilities to Windows Explorer, which carry through to the Open dialog box (and other file browsing dialog boxes) in LiveCycle Designer ES2. With some file extensions like XDP for example, the Open dialog may incorrectly handle multiple file selection and cause LiveCycle Designer ES2 to crash.

To correct this issue, it is recommended that you obtain and apply updates for the third party applications to enable multiple file selection, or to select and open only one XDP file at a time.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)

LiveCycle Designer ES2: Using Form Validation feature with static forms

When you use the Form Validation feature with a static PDF form to color mandatory fields that are not filled or fields that fail validation, Designer ES2 may change the appearance of the borders of validated fields. When you use the Form Validation feature with a static form that contains objects with borders, it is recommended that you select the Square Corners option on the Borders tab for each object with a border.

For more information on form validation, see Displaying validation errors in Adobe Acrobat.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Watching instead of reading!

Alright, not quite true. We’re the “Doc” team, so we are still providing you written documentation to help you out with LiveCycle. But, for the LiveCycle ES2 release, we decided to also provide you more videos. They’re short, they’re easy to view, and they walk you through some common tasks in Workbench ES2 and Designer ES2.

Check them out LiveCycle ES2 Self-paced Learning Resources.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Changing the fill color of a field based on a condition

It is easy to change the fill color of a field based on a condition, such as when a number exceeds a certain amount. For example, the script (JavaScript) below changes the fill color of a field to yellow when the value is below 100 and red when the value is 100 and up.

Try it
1) From LiveCycle Designer, open the “Dynamic Purchase Order” sample form (Purchase Order Dynamic.xdp).
2) Select the Quantity field (numQty).
3) Select and the “exit” event if a user will be entering data in the field or select the “initialize” event when the field is populated with data.
4) Copy and paste the following script into the Script Editor and edit the fill color to suit your purpose. If you would like the fill color to change for both user entered data and populated data, copy and paste the script into both the “exit” and “initialize” events.

if (this.rawValue >= 100) //red
{
this.fillColor = “255,0,0″;
}
else
this.fillColor = “255,255,0″; //yellow

5) Test the script using the Preview PDF tab.

Tips
Use a numeric field with this script.
Make sure that you select JavaScript and run at the client.
Make sure that the “Preview Adobe XML Form As” property (in Form Properties) is set to “Dynamic XML Form”.
Use the “initialize” event to make the fill color change when the form is populated with data.
Use the “exit” event to make the fill color change when a user enters data.

For more LiveCycle Designer scripting samples, visit the LiveCycle Developer Center at http://www.adobe.com/devnet/livecycle/designer_scripting_samples.html/.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Tips for creating form designs for Acrobat and Adobe Reader

Where to start
If you are new to Designer ES, start with one of the tutorials. If not, you can look at one of the sample forms installed with Designer ES. The sample forms illustrate form design techniques, from simple to complex. Each sample is accompanied by a form design, sample data and/or schema, as well as the final version of the form. If one of the sample forms suits your requirements, use it as a starting point. The sample forms are installed in the EN\Samples\Forms folder under the LiveCycle Designer ES installation folder.

See Quick Start Tutorials in Adobe LiveCycle Designer ES Help.

Build compatible forms
Make sure that you determine the version of Acrobat and Adobe Reader that people will use to fill the form. Setting the correct target version ensures that the form designs that you create are compatible.

See Target Version in Adobe LiveCycle Designer ES Help.

Design for reuse
Use fragments if you are planning to use the same element in multiple forms. Using fragments makes updating the common elements much easier.

See Using Fragments in Adobe LiveCycle Designer ES Help.

Consider security
You may want users to enter a password for such things as opening, printing, copying text or applying signatures. When designing interactive PDF forms it is important to ensure that your forms and the data you gather is secure. Designer ES includes many functions and features that provide security options for your forms.

See Setting Security in Adobe LiveCycle Designer ES Help.

Make forms accessible
An accessible form is one that is simple and usable. A simple layout of controls and fields with clear, meaningful captions and tool tips will make the form much easier for all users to fill.

See Creating Accessible Forms in Adobe LiveCycle Designer ES Help.

How it’s done
It is easier to start with the layout of the form and then add the dynamic parts, and scripting. While designing the form, preview it often. Previewing ensures that your form designs look and behave the way you intended. Here is an example of the workflow you might use to create a form design:

Set the target version.
Set the form size and define master pages.
Add the form elements (title, header, body, footer),
Set tabbing order.
Test the form with users.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Forms IVS – A Form-tastic Development and Testing Tool

Adobe LiveCycle ES provides a sample web application called Forms Installation Verification Sample (IVS). This sample is a web-based application that interacts with the Forms ES service to generate interactive PDF forms, HTML forms, and form guides that users can fill and submit. After you deploy the Forms IVS, you can use a web browser to render form designs created in LiveCycle Designer ES for testing purposes. Another use for the Forms IVS application is for debugging the forms in isolation from the rest of your LiveCycle ES application that was created in LiveCycle Workbench ES.

Continue reading…

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Thinking About Form Design

This is not an official Adobe endorsement.

There, I said it. Now that we have that out of the way, I thought I’d share a reference that I’ve come to respect over the last year or so.

http://formulate.com.au

I had the good fortune to meet Ms. Enders at the Business Forms Management Association (BFMA) symposium in Las Vegas last year. I was impressed by her presentation on form design techniques, not the least of which because it seemed like a topic that a lot of form design professionals at the symposium were eager to learn more about. In particular, check out Ms. Ender’s articles section (http://formulate.com.au/articles/). There’s a lot of good information in there that I think is worthwhile reading, for experienced form design professionals and newcomers alike.

Design, and design thinking, is really becoming integrated into all facets of business these days, and it only makes sense that it plays a large role in terms of how organizations implement form solutions. How best to capture user data, I learned at the symposium, is not something that is always well understood. Contemporary research into user behaviors and more effective design is often overlooked by form solutions, which really means that the poor individual who must fill out the form — sometimes called a “customer” — is left to suffer. Then, of course, it’s the organization that suffers through additional costs and inefficiencies associated with data entry errors.

Ms. Enders is just one of a number of people out there who are bringing some formal design principles and research to the form design space. If you have links to other sources that you have found useful, please comment directly to this blog and share. We’re always curious to know who our readers are reading, and I’m sure other readers would be interested to know as well.

Have a good day.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Was this helpful? Please rate the content.
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)