Posts in Category "Designer"

Visible (Print Only) presence option may not work on button objects when target version is Acrobat and Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later

The Visible (Print Only) option is available in the Presence list on the Object palette. When you apply the Visible (Print Only) option to an object, the object appears only when the form is printed, and does not appear when the form is viewed on-screen.

However, when you select Acrobat and Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later as the target version for a form, and apply the Visible (Print Only) presence option to a button object, the option may not work on the following versions of LiveCycle Designer:

– LiveCycle Designer 7.0 and 7.1
With dynamic PDF forms that are migrated to LiveCycle Designer 9.0 and then opened in Acrobat or Adobe Reader 8.0 or later, the Button object may be invisible when the form is printed.

– LiveCycle Designer 9.0
With static and dynamic PDF forms, the Button object may still be visible on the screen when you view the form by using the Preview PDF tab in LiveCycle Designer 9.0 or open it in Adobe Acrobat 7.0.5 or later.

Note: This issue does not occur in Adobe Acrobat 8.0 with dynamic PDF forms.

To resolve these issues, you must carry out these four steps for each Button object that you want to show or hide in Acrobat and Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later:

1. Click the Button object, and in the Language list in the Script Editor, select JavaScript.
2. In the Presence list on the Object palette, select Invisible.
3. Copy and paste the following script into the prePrint event in the Script Editor.
this.presence = “visible”;
4. Copy and paste the following script into the postPrint event in the Script Editor.
this.presence = “invisible”;

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A simple script that lets you calculate an amount based on a user’s input

It’s getting close to tax time here in Canada and I’m thinking about my retirement plan contributions. While looking at the Federal tax form online, I thought about how nice it would be if the form could calculate an amount based on my input. So I created a little script in LiveCycle Designer ES that calculates how much I can deduct based on my Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions. Of course, the percentage I used for the calculation is purely fictional and the Canadian Government would never let me send in my own version of the form!

I used the response method to create the dialog box that contains the question and entry field. The following message box appears when I tab to the field.

RRSP_Message_Box2.gif

Here is the calculated field:
RRSP_Result2.gif

To create the calculation in this example:
1. In Designer ES, drag a Decimal Field object onto the form design.
2. In the Field tab, select a pattern for the field. In this example I selected a predefined display pattern (num{($z,zz9.99)}).
3. In the Script Editor, select the Enter event, JavaScript language, and run the script at the Client.
4. Copy and paste the following script into the Script Editor.
var RRSPResponse = xfa.host.response("What is your total RRSP contribution for the year ?", "RRSP Contribution", "", false);
$.rawValue = RRSPResponse * 0.536;

5. Save the form as a PDF file.

Now you try it and have fun!

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Adding common layout and background elements to a form design

You can add common layout and background elements to a form design using master pages. A form design is the design-time version of a form that you create in LiveCycle Designer ES. By default, all new form designs have a master page, which is applied to the first page. Any page that you add to the form design is formatted according to the layout of the default master page unless you create and apply different master pages to other pages.

At the very least, master pages can define the orientation and dimensions of pages. For example, you can create one master page for portrait orientation and a second master page for landscape orientation. In more complex forms, you can use master pages to adjust the size and position of content areas, add page numbering, company logos, and create single- or double-sided features (such as headers and footers).

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Understanding relationships between objects in the Object Library

When you create calculations and scripts in LiveCycle Designer ES, you should be aware that the objects on which you are adding scripts are actually defined as XML objects in the underlying XML Forms Architecture. That means while the Standard tab of the Object Library palette contains a wide variety of objects, many of those objects are defined by the same XML object. As a result, the various scripting properties and methods that are available are based on the definition of the XML object, and not the object in the Object Library palette.

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Tips for maximizing Output service performance

Here are a few easy ways to improve performance when using the Output service with forms.

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How to exclude objects on a master page from the tabbing order sequence

When customizing the tabbing order sequence between objects on a form, you may sometimes want to exclude certain objects on the master page from the sequence, but without using the Protected option on the Value tab to do so.

You can do this by applying a setFocus method on the objects you want to exclude. The script excludes an object by changing the focus to the next object in the sequence. That is, when you tab to an object on which the setFocus script is applied, the script automatically executes and moves the focus to the next object.

For example if you have a Button object on the master page that is not protected, you can apply the following JavaScript on the onEnter method.

xfa.host.setFocus(this.parent.nextButtonInTabSq);

Keep in mind that the setFocus method configures the object to always jump to the scripted target; the object will no longer be included in the tabbing order displayed on the Tab Order palette.

To learn more about Scripting, go to the LiveCycle Designer ES Help and search for Scripting.

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How to exclude objects on a master page from the tabbing order sequence

When customizing the tabbing order sequence between objects on a form, you may sometimes want to exclude certain objects on the master page from the sequence, but without using the Protected option on the Value tab to do so.

You can do this by applying a setFocus method on the objects you want to exclude. The script excludes an object by changing the focus to the next object in the sequence. That is, when you tab to an object on which the setFocus script is applied, the script automatically executes and moves the focus to the next object.

For example if you have a Button object on the master page that is not protected, you can apply the following JavaScript on the onEnter method.

xfa.host.setFocus(this.parent.nextButtonInTabSq);

Keep in mind that the setFocus method configures the object to always jump to the scripted target; the object will no longer be included in the tabbing order displayed on the Tab Order palette.

To learn more about Scripting, go to the LiveCycle Designer ES Help and search for Scripting.

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Using LiveCycle Designer ES to create and print RFID labels

LiveCycle Designer ES lets you create and print RFID labels to capture data. RFID (radio-frequency identification) is an automatic identification technology whereby digital data that is encoded in an RFID tag or smart label is captured by a reader by using radio waves. It is similar to barcode technology but uses radio waves to capture data from tags, rather than optically scanning the bar codes on a label. Using RFID does not require the tag or label to be seen in order to read its stored data. [obtained from zebra.com.]

For example, airports use RFID labels for labeling luggage. RFID readers can accurately capture the information and flight details for each item that passes through a baggage handling system, regardless of its orientation or the speed of the conveyor. Some tags can even be immersed in water and continue to function with the same accuracy!

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