Posts in Category "LiveCycle SDK"

Hot off the press! Adding tabs to Adobe LiveCycle Workspace ES2

In LiveCycle Workspace ES2 (version 9.0.0.2), tabs are available for you to start new processes, view tasks that are assigned to you, and track tasks and processes. What if you wanted to add your own tab to enhance it? Check out a new article by Nithiyanandam Dharmadass that describes how to add navigation tabs to Workspace here.

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Customizing LiveCycle Workspace 9.x using Flash Builder 4.x

When Customizing the LiveCycle Workspace ES2 User Interface [link] guide was released, it was before Adobe Flash Builder was available for us to do our certification testing. Technically, it is possible to use Flash Builder provided you use the Flex SDK version 3.4.1, ant-contrib.jar file version 1.0b2, and Ant-plug-in as described in the guide. For more information, see the LiveCycle Product blog for steps in the posting Customize LC Workspace ES2 UI using FB4 Premium on 64-bit O/S

In a future release, we plan to complete certification testing and update the guide with updated instructions, but in the meantime, here are some instructions for you to configure your environment to build Workspace customizations using Flash Builder 4. You must complete the last step in the blog when your development environment is a 64-bit operating system.

Happy customizing!

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API Documentation for ECM Connectors is now Online

Here’s announcing the availability of the documentation for LiveCycle APIs that assist in seamlessly integrating your LiveCycle solution components with industry-leading enterprise content management  (ECM) systems. LiveCycle APIs are currently available for EMC Documentum, IBM Content Manager, IBM FileNet, and Micrososft SharePoint Server.  Click on the following links to view the APIs for currently supported EMC systems.

  1. EMC Documentum
  2. IBM FileNet
  3. IBM Content Manager
  4. Microsoft SharePoint

For more information on how LiveCycle Connectors for ECM systems, go to: http://www.adobe.com/products/livecycle/connectors/.

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Get up and running quickly by using LiveCycle ES2 API Quick Starts

Did you know that you can use LiveCycle ES2 API Quick Starts located in Programming with LiveCycle ES2 to quickly get up and running with the LiveCycle ES2 SDK? API Quick Starts are complete pieces of application logic that you can copy and paste into your own developments environments that programmatically perform LiveCycle ES2 operations. For example, you can use the API Quick Start titled Converting a PostScript file to a PDF document using the Java API to convert a PostScript file into a PDF document. In fact, you can watch an online video that demonstrates how to use API Quick Starts at the following URL: http://tv.adobe.com/watch/duanes-world/duanes-world-david-rr-webber-oasis-and-livecycle-es2/.

The content that discusses how to use an API Quick Start is located about 11 minutes into the presentation.

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Updated Creating Flex Applications Enabled for LiveCycle Workspace ES2 guide

Applications developed using Flex for data capture experiences are referred to as Flex applications, and often informally called Flex forms. You create Flex applications for LiveCycle Workspace ES2 for interesting data capture experiences; or simply because you require an alternative to PDF forms and HTML forms. Check out the walkthrough in the Creating Flex Applications Enabled for LiveCycle Workspace ES2 guide here.

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Quick Starts available for LiveCycle ES2!

Developing LiveCycle ES2 applications for LiveCycle ES2 or client-side applications are easier with Quick Starts. What are Quick Starts you ask? It depends…

  • If you are a developer using Workbench ES2 , Quick Starts are short narratives that demonstrate how to configure operations together to solve a use case Workbench ES2.
  • If you are a programmer, Quick Starts are code snippets that describe how to invoke a service operation programmatically using Java API, web services and LiveCycle ES2 remoting.

For instance, have you ever wondered how to create a process in Workbench ES2 to send the output from merging a form design with data to a network printer, or how to write Java code to encrypt a PDF file? If so, you’ll be happy to find out how by clicking here. In the future, we’ll be posting more Quick Starts for LiveCycle ES2 to this web page. Stay tuned!

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Create LiveCycle ES2 services that return real-time web service data

Did you know that as a Java programmer, you can create LiveCycle ES2 services that return real-time web service data? That is right, you can create a business process that retrieves real-time web service data over the Internet by using a LiveCycle ES2 service that invokes external web services. For example, assume you want to create a business process for the National Weather Service, a branch of the United States government. You can create a LiveCycle ES2 service that can invoke an external web service and retrieve weather data.

Although you can communicate with a third party web service using the LiveCycle web service component available with Workbench ES2, you can create a custom component instead. Creating a custom component offers you additional flexibility. For example, you can develop the component to analyze real-time data and then create an XML schema to better reflect your business priorities.

Also when using the web service component in Workbench ES2, you have to create an XML SOAP request and handle a SOAP response. Some Workbench ES2 users may be unfamiliar with SOAP requests and responses. Instead, create a Java proxy library using JAW-WS or AXIS. Then all you have to do is call methods that retrieve the data from the third party web service. There is no need to create XML SOAP requests and handle SOAP responses. The Java proxy library can be used within a LiveCycle ES2 component.

After the component is deployed, Workbench ES2 users can then use operations by dragging operations onto a process map. They do not have to specify a WSDL endpoint, create XML SOAP requests or handle SOAP responses. It is the component that handles the SOAP requests and responses, not Workbench ES2 users. For details, check out the following article: http://www.adobe.com/devnet/livecycle/articles/extend_webservices.html.

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Should I use the Output service or Forms service?

Recently, when I was automating a process, part of the requirement was to merge XML data with a form design that was created in Adobe LiveCycle Designer ES. When you are merging a form design with data from an XML file, you can use either the Forms service or Output service in LiveCycle ES. Depending on how you use the resultant merged form design and data, determines which service best meets your requirements.

Continue reading…

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Making Life Easier When Developing Custom LiveCycle ES Components

Recently, I was developing a LiveCycle ES component that uses Java APIs that are new to me. As I was thinking about how to implement the functionality that these new APIs offered into a LiveCycle ES component, a development pattern occurred to me. This pattern can be used by any LiveCycle ES component developer.

Because a LiveCycle ES component runs as a service, there isn’t an easy way to debug the application logic. That is, how can I set a breakpoint in the Java code and step through it? How can I ensure that these APIs are doing what they are supposed to do?

The answer is to use Java APIs inside a test Java console application. Then, you can set a breakpoint and step through your Java application logic to ensure the application logic works properly. Once you are satisfied the application works, copy the application logic from your test Java project to your Java project that creates a custom component.

This worked for me. The new Java APIs I was using were proxy Java APIs that consume a web service that returns real-time weather information. That is right – I wanted to embed a custom service into LiveCycle ES that returns real-time weather information so I can embed weather information into a PDF document. And using this pattern, I was able to ensure that the Java APIs worked before I used them inside a LiveCycle ES component.

Note: If you are interested in knowing how to create a custom LiveCycle ES component that invokes an external web service, then keep an eye out for a future development article titled Invoking Web Services using Custom Components to appear on the LiveCycle ES developer center. As a component developer, this is an article you won’t want to miss.

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Invoking LiveCycle ES 8.2 services using Java proxy files created using JAX-WS

Did you know that you can use JAX-WS to create Java proxy classes that
consume the SOAP stack of a LiveCycle ES 8.2 service? That is correct,
you have another choice when deciding how best to invoke LiveCycle ES
from a Java client application.

When creating proxy classes, you do not need to include LiveCycle Java
client JAR files in your Java project’s class path.  For example,
assume you want to invoke the Encryption service to protect a PDF
document with password-based encryption.

Continue reading…

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