by AWK

 Comments (7)

Created

May 1, 2006

This post is subject to Adobe's Terms of Use.

Welcome! We’re launching our blog focused on accessibility – this blog will share information about accessibility best practices for our many products, important occurances in the world of accessiblity in the context of developing with or using Adobe products, and other timely information that impacts how developers can use our products to deliver accessible information and experiences to all users.
Adobe has a new web site design as of today, fully combining the content of the macromedia.com site. If you’re looking for the accessibility resources for Adobe products the new starting point is the Adobe Accessibility Resource Center at http://www.adobe.com/accessibility/. This resource will continue to grow over time – please let us know what you think or what you’d like to see!

COMMENTS

  • By John Howard - 4:44 PM on May 24, 2006  

    I would like to see task-oriented Action Scripting tutorials for adding Accessibility components to Flash Movies.
    As a newbie to Flash, I’m experiencing a steep learning curve and difficulty finding online information for what should be common tasks.
    For example, I would imagine that there is a common need for a Flash movie player with Accessible controls for keyboard/screen reader users.
    How about Adobe’s recommended coding method to embed inline Flash media into XHTML compliant pages that validate?
    Why is it recommended that MS Internet Explorer be used to access inline Flash media when I’m told that Mozilla Firefox integrates with MS Active Accessibility very well?
    These are some of the issues I hope you can demystify and provide resources for in this Blog.
    Thank You,
    John Howard
    IU Adaptive Technology Center

  • By AWK - 5:38 PM on May 24, 2006  

    Thanks for the note John. We can clear up a one of these right now, others will take more time and are great ideas.

    I would like to see task-oriented Action Scripting tutorials for adding Accessibility components to Flash Movies.
    For example, I would imagine that there is a common need for a Flash movie player with Accessible controls for keyboard/screen reader users.

    I agree – we can never have too much of this.

    How about Adobe’s recommended coding method to embed inline Flash media into XHTML compliant pages that validate?

    Have you seen the Active Content Developer Center?. I also did a write-up on the old Macromedia accessibility blog: In Search of a Perfect Plugin.

    Why is it recommended that MS Internet Explorer be used to access inline Flash media when I’m told that Mozilla Firefox integrates with MS Active Accessibility very well?

    Becuase we don’t have a player that supports MSAA for the Firefox browser yet. In the past this wasn’t an issue because there was no MSAA support in Firefox. This change has not escaped attention, but it is not part of the Flash 9 release.

  • By steve - 9:24 AM on June 1, 2006  

    I created a fully accessible, complex e-learning flash website last year. It was working on my PC with JAWS 4.50.138 and IE 6.0.2800.1106 and Flash Player 7 on windows 2000 professional (amongst other tested platforms).
    However when I went to test it with JAWS recently it is no longer working. I no longer hear “Flash Movie start” and no accessible text is read any longer. I can still tab to buttons and they are read out, but none of the text is.
    I have the same problem with the examples on your site. I have tried JAWS 7 also.
    Any ideas why this no longer works? Is this aresult of the ActiveX updates?

  • By Ellesse - 5:56 AM on June 14, 2006  

    “Is this a result of the ActiveX updates?”
    Yes, it is. I am in the same situation. Any idea on how to fix this problem?

  • By AWK - 9:51 PM on June 15, 2006  

    The ActiveX update has impacted the way that assistive technologies interact with Flash content, but I can’t tell enough from your posting.
    To fix the problem, I recommend using the strategy described at the Active Content Developer Center.

  • By Adrian Higginbotham - 11:07 AM on August 25, 2006  

    Andrew: will the Blog be getting an rss feed so we can track new entries and comments?

  • By Pascale Vial - 9:45 AM on October 9, 2006  

    I work in graphics/curriculum at Texas School for the Blind and would like to make pdfs accessible to JAWS. I have a Mac with Adobe Acrobat Professional 7.0 and InDesign and have followed the directions for making a simple tagged pdf. In AAP and AReader 7.0.5 Mac it tells me there are no accessibility problems, tag structure is ok, etc.
    When I bring it to our PCs with JAWS, JAWS can only read the top menu bar information, nothing in the document (though I was able to get it to tab through paragraphs). Adobe Reader 5.0, which is all we have on the school PCs right now, tells me it’s an untagged pdf when I check the Document Properties.
    I need to at least get past this first step, getting it recognized as a tagged pdf by the PCs and JAWS. Is it the version of Adobe Reader on the PCs that’s causing the problem? (I saved the pdf to be compatible with this version).