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August 20, 2014 /How-To's /

How well do you really know your PDF file?

It’s time you knew: No matter how long you’ve been working on that PDF file, it may be keeping some secrets from you. Sure, you wrote the copy, formatted the images, arranged them very nicely on the pages, and then exported to PDF. It seems like a perfectly nice file, not the type that’d withhold information or anything like that. And yet… nearly every PDF file has information that you can’t see just by looking at the page (don’t worry, it’s not at all sinister). Let me tell you what I mean.

When you create a PDF file, you’re doing more than just adding “.pdf” to the filename. Not only does the PDF file retain information about where it comes from and how it was made, it can also include layers: text that you might continue editing in Acrobat; images that can be exported or edited in external apps; tags and structure to make sure that PDF is accessible; even hidden information like attachments or document properties. If you plan to share that PDF file around, don’t you want to know if it’s got personal or sensitive information stored invisibly? Acrobat can find and remove that sensitive content, even if you don’t see it when you’re reading through your newly minted DPF file.

You can also trust Acrobat to help you optimize your PDF. Why share a 350 MB file when you can trim it down to, say, 75 MB? Even if you don’t know what kind of content is safe to remove, Acrobat can take a look under the hood of the PDF file to clear out some of the unnecessary content that’s weighing you down.

The Acrobat User Community has got a lot of great information to help you get to know your PDF file inside and out. Check out some of these tips, and learn what your PDF file is really made of:

Why is my PDF so large?

Get a detailed report of everything that’s in your PDF file

Find (and remove) hidden content in your PDF file

How to optimize a scanned PDF file

Determine the DPI of images in your PDF file

Categories: How-To's