ADC Write & Give update – Q1 2013

The Adobe Developer Connection (ADC) Write and Give Program gave $3,000 USD to charities in the first quarter of 2013. The program acknowledges the writing efforts of our ADC community authors by making a charitable contribution to a charity for every author who publishes content on the ADC. Each author chooses his or her charity from a list of five preselected charities (listed below).

To date the ADC has donated over $75,000 to these charities through the program in recognition of our ADC authors. To our ADC authors, we thank you for sharing your technical expertise with the greater developer community while helping other communities at the same time!

Read on to find out more about the charities that the program supports, and to see the list of authors for this quarter who made these contributions possible!

Benetech: Creates new technology solutions that serve humanity and empower people to improve their lives.

Nature Conservancy: Works to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.

Mercy Corp: Alleviates suffering, poverty, and oppression by helping people build secure, productive, and just communities.

Care: Fights global poverty by serving individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world.

Feeding America: Is the nation’s largest charitable hunger-relief organization.

The authors who participated in this program from December 1, 2012 – February 28, 2013 are:

  • Alex Liebert
  • Luke Whittaker
  • Brandon Satrom
  • Sangmin Shim
  • Michael Cavaretta
  • Chris Griffith
  • Karolina Szczur
  • Ryan Morel
  • Bermon Painter

Thank you, authors, for your contributions to the ADC!

Keep up with Web Standards Content on the ADC

Recently I posted a look back at all the HTML, CSS, JavaScript and mobile content on the ADC in 2012. I received a lot of great feedback but a number of people noted that they were surprised by how many of these articles they missed. In response to this feedback, I have decided to personally create a monthly newsletter that will share any articles and tutorials that we published on the topics of HTML, CSS, JavaScript and PhoneGap on the ADC. You can sign up for the newsletter here. In addition, you can always follow the article releases as they are published via our RSS feed for these topics.

Sign up for the newsletter today.

Simplicity in Web Development

As HTML, CSS and JavaScript developers, we have a plethora of commercial and open source tools available to us today. Every week seems to feature another release of a major library or framework that tries to solve everyday development problems. All of these tools promise to simplify the otherwise complex job of being a web developer. Karolina Szczur, in her recent ADC article “The Pursuit of Simplicity“, explains how we often turn to these tools hoping that they both simplify the work of coding but also simplify our code. However, each has its benefits and drawbacks and we need to be aware of them before we choose to use them. Karolina’s article, based upon her popular presentation of the same name, discusses the good and bad parts of using tools like frameworks, libraries and CSS preprocessors. Read the article and, as always, I’d love to hear your feedback.

ADC Write & Give update

The Adobe Developer Connection (ADC) Write and Give Program gave $3,000 USD to charities in the fourth quarter of 2012. The program acknowledges the writing efforts of our ADC community authors by making a charitable contribution to a charity for every author who publishes content on the ADC. Each author chooses his or her charity from a list of five preselected charities (listed below).

To date the ADC has donated over $72,000 to these charities through the program in recognition of our ADC authors. To our ADC authors, we thank you for sharing your technical expertise with the greater developer community while helping other communities at the same time!

Read on to find out more about the charities that the program supports, and to see the list of authors for this quarter who made these contributions possible!

Benetech: Creates new technology solutions that serve humanity and empower people to improve their lives.

Nature Conservancy: Works to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.

Mercy Corp: Alleviates suffering, poverty, and oppression by helping people build secure, productive, and just communities.

Care: Fights global poverty by serving individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world.

Feeding America: Is the nation’s largest charitable hunger-relief organization.

The authors who participated in this program from September 1, 2012 – November 30, 2012 are:

  • Scott Sheridan
  • Joseph Labrecque
  • Ryan Morel
  • Alex Liebert
  • Keith Gladstien
  • Janine Warner
  • Axel Rauschmayer
  • Michael Walmsley
  • Andy Matthews
  • Oswald Campesato
  • David Hassoun
  • John Crosby

Thank you, authors, for your contributions to the ADC!

Best of 2012 article & tutorial list

While there are still a couple months left in 2012, I wanted to post some of our highest rated/trafficked content pieces that the Adobe Developer Connection has published in 2012.  There is some top notch content in the list below thanks to our terrific community authors who continue to donate their time to write tutorials for the larger development community.

Which piece is your favorite??

PhoneGap content:

JavaScript fundamentals & frameworks:

Web standards:

Flash Professional CS6:

Designing for multiple screens:

 

Happy reading & happy coding!

Learn to use Edge Code, Edge Inspect and PhoneGap Build

At yesterday’s Create the Web event, Adobe announced a number of new products that are already available for you to use. I have covered a full summary of the keynote on my personal blog if you’re interested. Of course, if you are excited about the announcements, you may want to know a little bit more about the products and how to use them. The good news is that we’ve posted a some new (and one updated) tutorials on the ADC covering several of the key products announced.

Edge Code
Edge Code is a new Brackets distribution that is geared towards integration with other Edge tools and services. Currently it integrates with Edge Web Fonts and PhoneGap Build and will integrate with more services over time.  A free preview release of Edge Code is available today. You can get the details on using Edge Code and the new features in my article for the Adobe Developer Connection, “HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Code Editing with Edge Code.”

Edge Inspect
Edge Inspect, formerly called Shadow, helps solve the difficulty of testing and debugging mobile web sites across the ever growing list of devices and screens. It has features like remote debugging using Weinre and collecting screenshots on all devices at once. Edge Inspect is now available via subscription, including a free version. You can learn more about how to use Edge Inspect in my article on the Adobe Developer Connection, “Browser testing across devices with Adobe Edge Inspect.”

PhoneGap Build
The official release of PhoneGap Build was announced yesterday. PhoneGap Build is a service that creates the multiple distributions for a wide array of device operating systems in the cloud. If you want to learn more about PhoneGap Build and the new features, including Hydration, which automatically updates you app when a new build is posted, check out Ray Camden’s article on the Adobe Developer Connection, “PhoneGap Build Levels Up.”

Creating Native-like PhoneGap Apps

A few months ago I was lucky enough to attend PhoneGap Day in Portland. I saw a lot of great presentations, but a presentation by Greg Avola, creator of Untappd, really stood out. He was discussing some difficult lessons he learned while creating his popular app for a variety of platforms using PhoneGap. While he praised PhoneGap for making it easy to develop for multiple platforms using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, he also encountered a number of places where gaining the user experience and performance he wanted required some tweaks. These were hard-won lessons and Greg’s goal was to help other developers avoid some of the difficulties he faced.

While Greg’s presentation was great, I really felt that it was important enough to deserve a wider audience than just those able to attend PhoneGap Day. Thankfully, Greg agreed to turn his presentation into an article for the Adobe Developer Connection. Yesterday, we published Greg’s article “Creating apps with PhoneGap: Lessons learned” and if you are already doing PhoneGap development or are interested in it, I’d call it a “must read.” As always, feel free to share your feedback.

An in-depth look at CSS3 Transitions

If you are a web designer or front-end developer using HTML and CSS, it’s likely you have heard of Louis Lazaris. Even if you don’t recognize the name, you have probably at some point referenced one of the many posts on his blog, Impressive Webs, or other well-known publications. So, I am very happy that the ADC has published a contribution by Louis covering the topic of CSS3 transitions titled “Using CSS3 transitions: A comprehensive guide.” As the title indicates, this is a great tutorial and reference for creating and triggering animations using various CSS transitions. Louis covers the syntax for building transitions via your stylesheets, then discusses various ways for triggering transitions, offers some useful tips and techniques and discusses the current state of browser support. If you are new to using transitions, this is a great “how to” and if you have already used transitions, I think it still makes a perfect reference.

So, please, check out Louis’ article and, as always, feel free to share your feedback.

ADC Write & Give update – Q3

The Adobe Developer Connection (ADC) Write and Give Program gave $1,000 USD to charities in the third quarter of 2012. The program acknowledges the writing efforts of our ADC community authors by making a charitable contribution to a charity for every author who publishes content on the ADC. Each author chooses his or her charity from a list of five preselected charities (listed below).

To date the ADC has donated over $69,000 to these charities through the program in recognition of our ADC authors. To our ADC authors, we thank you for sharing your technical expertise with the greater developer community while helping other communities at the same time!

Read on to find out more about the charities that the program supports, and to see the list of authors for this quarter who made these contributions possible!

Benetech: Creates new technology solutions that serve humanity and empower people to improve their lives.

Nature Conservancy: Works to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.

Mercy Corp: Alleviates suffering, poverty, and oppression by helping people build secure, productive, and just communities.

Care: Fights global poverty by serving individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world.

Feeding America: Is the nation’s largest charitable hunger-relief organization.

The authors who participated in this program from June 1, 2012 – August 31, 2012 are:

  • Joseph Zimmerman
  • Nathan Weber
  • Alex Liebert
  • Sarah Northway
  • Ryan Morel
  • Jens Brynildsen
  • Greg Caldwell
  • Chris Converse
  • Jeff Tapper
  • Burke Holland

Thank you, authors, for your contributions to the ADC!

Connecting to 3rd Party API’s with CORS

CORS stands for cross-origin resource sharing and it is an HTML5 feature that allows you to connect to 3rd party API’s without hitting browser security warnings. In the past, you’d usually have to write server-side API wrappers or use JSONP, which only works for reading and isn’t supported by many API’s. Now, with CORS, you can forgo the wrapper and even do things like post, put and delete. I have been walking through HTML5 features, going from left to right on HTML5 Readiness, on my blog and as part of this journey I investigated CORS. In my latest article for the ADC, I take a look at the feature in some detail and discuss browser support in current browser versions. I show some examples of how you can connect to the GitHub API, which is one of a growing number of API’s that support CORS. So please read “Understanding Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS)” and please feel free to share your thoughts on the article.