Posts in Category "ActionScript"

Adobe Cookbooks recipe drive – extended

After rolling out the CF recipe drive a few weeks back, I received a lot of feedback from community members who were contributing Flex, ActionScript and Flash code recipes to the Cookbook. Their feedback can be succinctly boiled down to, “Hey, what about us? We like t-shirts too!”

You want it? You got it! This post is to officially extend the recipe drive to include contributions made to the Flex Cookbook, the ActionScript Cookbook and the Flash Cookbook.

Not sure what the Adobe Cookbooks is? It is a repository for community generated code samples that offer fellow developers coding tips & tricks, workarounds and solutions to specific development challenges. If you are still uncertain as to what the Adobe Cookbooks are all about, or what a code recipe should look like, take a peek at this recipe to get a better idea.

For the entire month of November, EVERY person who contributes a code recipe to the one of the Cookbooks above will receive an ADC branded t-shirt. If you contribute two recipes in that time frame, yes, you will receive two shirts!

How do you collect your shirt, you ask? Simple: drop me an email <esulliva at adobe dot com> with the link to your recipe contribution, your preferred t-shirt size and your mailing address/phone. That’s it…you’re done!

But wait…we’re not done yet. Whoever submits the most recipes during the contest duration will receive an ADC-branded Timbuk2 bag that will contain some additional yummy surprises in it.

One final word: please don’t rush over to the cookbook and submit a bunch of a half-baked code recipes just to get a t-shirt. That’s not going to help anyone. If you really need a t-shirt that bad, email me <esulliva at adobe dot com> and I may take pity on you.

If you have any questions on the recipe drive or the cookbook application itself, don’t hesitate to drop me a note <esulliva at adobe dot com>.

I am looking forward to seeing some great code contributions from the community…happy coding!

Adobe is sponsoring ZendCon 2010

Just a quick FYI that Adobe is sponsoring the upcoming ZendCon 2010.

ZendCon, the premier PHP conference, will be held in Santa Clara, CA from November 1st – 4th. Adobe Platform Evangelist, Ryan Stewart, will be speaking on utilizing ActionScript coming from a PHP background. You’ll learn how to architect complex applications built using Flex and ActionScript in his session on November 3rd at 2:45pm.

Click here to see more information and to register.

Creating games on the Adobe Flash Platform

The Adobe Flash Platform is the leading platform in the world for developing games on the web. The Flash Platform Game Technology Center is a great place to start learning how to develop your very own Flash games. Additionally, several articles have been posted recently to the Adobe Developer Connection on the topic of game development that are great resources for developers creating games on the Flash Platform.

Danielle Deibler, a senior engineering manager at Adobe, wrote an article to introduce developers to the Flash Platform Game Technology Center. It is a great read as she discusses the tools for building games, the runtimes for rendering games and even touches on some of the new Flash Platform services being offered to assist developers in not only deploying their games, but also monetizing them.

Next, Nick Avgerinos, a senior systems engineer at Adobe, put out a terrific piece to provide an introduction to some of the many different Adobe technologies that you can use to build great games, in an attempt to break down some of the technologies and terminologies used in the Flash Platform to help new developers make sense of it all.

Finally, there are two articles that go into depth on using a technique called “blitting”. First Renaun Erickson (a recent addition to the Adobe Platform Evangelist team) demonstrates in his article how you can give your games a performance boost by using blitting techniques and Flash Builder 4. Then, Michael James Williams follows up with an article that delves into some more advanced blitting techniques and caching.

Dynamic stream switching

Dynamic bit rate switching is a pretty important concept to get right when your business hinges on delivering high-quality video to paying customers.

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David Hassoun (plus his team at RealEyes Media) provides an overview of the concepts involved in dynamic stream switching of Flash video using Flash Media Server 3. Use this technique to take into account varying network conditions that your users may encounter while viewing streaming content.

Playful Flash ActionScript 3.0 samples

Back in the day, Noah Zilberberg created two dozen samples for Macromedia Flash MX. Some of these files were complete applications, games, or other types of content — while others were simple movies intended to introduce a concept from which Flash users could build their own movies.

People loved them. But then Flash 8 came, and then Flash CS3 replaced it. Those samples were still online but woefully outdated. Dan Carr has updated the most interesting ones and added a few of his own. These Flash ActionScript 3.0 samples demonstrate various features common in Flash development.

Here’s one in particular that’s fun to play with:

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Which sample do you like best? Would you like to send us one of your own to add to the site?

ActionScript reference for RIA development

Mike Chambers and Frog Design have done an excellent job compiling an alphabetical reference for all native ActionScript APIs for the Adobe technology platform runtimes: Adobe Flash Player and Adobe AIR, as well as the Adobe Flex framework APIs.

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Use this guide both as an API reference and a tool to learn about the ActionScript APIs available within the runtimes. Mike says that this document is released under a Creative Commons license (people can redistribute, edit, and print). You could probably even have the source Adobe InDesign file if you wanted it. It’ll definitely be handed out at conferences — and maybe even the on AIR Tour now crisscrossing Europe.

Flash video template: Spokesperson presentation with synchronized graphics

The Flash video templates have remained popular downloads in the Flash Developer Center. This “spokesperson presentation with synchronized graphics” template features video, labeled content keyframes that synchronize text and graphics to the video, and navigation buttons along the bottom. While the video plays, the keyframes appear at preset times and the navigation buttons highlight the relevant topic. When the user clicks one of the buttons, the video and content update themselves to that topic automatically.

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Regulars of the Flash Developer Center will recognize this template from way back when it was first released with Macromedia Flash MX Professional 2004. (Note that the presentation example talks about “Macromedia On-Demand” — hey, anything to keep fans of Mike Downey happy.) Anyway, Dan Carr updated it a couple of years ago for Flash Professional 8 and now it’s all ready for Flash CS3 — and ActionScript 3.0. Enjoy!

Grab the notes from Colin Moock’s AS3 tour

Since October 2007, Colin Moock has traveled to several cities around the world on Adobe’s dime to promote the wonderful world of ActionScript 3.0. Appearing in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and Tokyo so far, Colin has given a free, intensive day of AS3 training to hundreds of developers. He covers the fundamental skills developers need to program for Adobe Flash Player and Adobe AIR.

Now you can grab a PDF of the notes he hands out in person at these events.

Lee Brimelow posted a video of Colin’s appearance in San Francisco. Charlie Griefer from the Fusion Authority was also pretty impressed with Colin’s SF appearance too.

Anyway, the ActionScript 3.0 From the Ground Up Tour continues to other locations in Europe (Munich, Amsterdam, London) as well as Bangalore and Sydney. Sign up to attend in a city near you. As Charlie put it, “I don’t know ActionScript, and I don’t know Colin Moock, but I figured for the free admission, I’d risk it. Now that it’s all said and done, I’d say the session was easily worth twice the price.”