Posts in Category "Uncategorized"

Simplicity in Web Development

As HTML, CSS and JavaScript developers, we have a plethora of commercial and open source tools available to us today. Every week seems to feature another release of a major library or framework that tries to solve everyday development problems. All of these tools promise to simplify the otherwise complex job of being a web developer. Karolina Szczur, in her recent ADC article “The Pursuit of Simplicity“, explains how we often turn to these tools hoping that they both simplify the work of coding but also simplify our code. However, each has its benefits and drawbacks and we need to be aware of them before we choose to use them. Karolina’s article, based upon her popular presentation of the same name, discusses the good and bad parts of using tools like frameworks, libraries and CSS preprocessors. Read the article and, as always, I’d love to hear your feedback.

Learn to use Edge Code, Edge Inspect and PhoneGap Build

At yesterday’s Create the Web event, Adobe announced a number of new products that are already available for you to use. I have covered a full summary of the keynote on my personal blog if you’re interested. Of course, if you are excited about the announcements, you may want to know a little bit more about the products and how to use them. The good news is that we’ve posted a some new (and one updated) tutorials on the ADC covering several of the key products announced.

Edge Code
Edge Code is a new Brackets distribution that is geared towards integration with other Edge tools and services. Currently it integrates with Edge Web Fonts and PhoneGap Build and will integrate with more services over time.  A free preview release of Edge Code is available today. You can get the details on using Edge Code and the new features in my article for the Adobe Developer Connection, “HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Code Editing with Edge Code.”

Edge Inspect
Edge Inspect, formerly called Shadow, helps solve the difficulty of testing and debugging mobile web sites across the ever growing list of devices and screens. It has features like remote debugging using Weinre and collecting screenshots on all devices at once. Edge Inspect is now available via subscription, including a free version. You can learn more about how to use Edge Inspect in my article on the Adobe Developer Connection, “Browser testing across devices with Adobe Edge Inspect.”

PhoneGap Build
The official release of PhoneGap Build was announced yesterday. PhoneGap Build is a service that creates the multiple distributions for a wide array of device operating systems in the cloud. If you want to learn more about PhoneGap Build and the new features, including Hydration, which automatically updates you app when a new build is posted, check out Ray Camden’s article on the Adobe Developer Connection, “PhoneGap Build Levels Up.”

Connecting to 3rd Party API’s with CORS

CORS stands for cross-origin resource sharing and it is an HTML5 feature that allows you to connect to 3rd party API’s without hitting browser security warnings. In the past, you’d usually have to write server-side API wrappers or use JSONP, which only works for reading and isn’t supported by many API’s. Now, with CORS, you can forgo the wrapper and even do things like post, put and delete. I have been walking through HTML5 features, going from left to right on HTML5 Readiness, on my blog and as part of this journey I investigated CORS. In my latest article for the ADC, I take a look at the feature in some detail and discuss browser support in current browser versions. I show some examples of how you can connect to the GitHub API, which is one of a growing number of API’s that support CORS. So please read “Understanding Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS)” and please feel free to share your thoughts on the article.

Good Twitter Bootstrap tutorial with code samples

Twitter Bootstrap has become a hugely popular framework for building HTML, CSS and JavaScript front-ends, both for the desktop browser and for mobile. It is one of the most watched and forked repositories on GitHub. Bootstrap includes a number of components, plugins, controls, styles and more to make it easier to quickly build attractive looking and responsive web applications. In her latest article, Adobe evangelist Holly Schinsky runs through a ton of the enormous list of features in Bootstrap. She briefly discusses what each feature is designed to do and then offers a code sample you can easily copy/paste for each. She also discusses Bootstrap’s grid system and how to download and use plugins for the framework. In the end, I think it makes both a great tutorial and a useful quick reference for many of Bootstrap’s features. Be sure to check it out on the ADC.

Look Under the Hood of Adobe Brackets

For anyone who hasn’t yet heard of Adobe Brackets, it is an open-source code editor created by Adobe and hosted on GitHub. While you can download early experimental builds on Brackets, it is early and not everyone may find it yet has all the features they want for every day use. Nonetheless, the team, with the help of an array of contributors from the community, is progressing quickly with new builds and new features.

One of the most exciting things about Brackets is not just that it is open-source but that it is built entirely using web standards technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript. This means that you can actually edit Brackets using Brackets (which I find very meta). More importantly, this also means that anyone with those skills can potentially contribute to the project, create their own extensions and help guide the future of the program. If you are interested in contributing or just curious about how Brackets is built, I highly recommend reading David Deraedt’s new article “An Overview of Brackets’ Code Architecture.” It walks you through how Brackets’ code is organized, some of the conventions used, how it leverages RequireJS for modules and much more. It is both instructional in the sense of seeing how a large scale open source project using web standards is architected but also invaluable if you are interested in digging into the code. So, please, take a moment to check out the article.

New JavaScript and HTML5 Tutorials on the ADC

Hopefully many of you have noticed that we have been pushing for some really great content on the topics of JavaScript and HTML5. Just yesterday we published a three-part series on Backbone.js by Adobe evangelist Christophe Coenraets and the first in a series on JavaScript design patterns by Joe Zimmerman.

Late last week, we also published the second in a four part series on building applications for Android and iOS using HTML5 and JavaScript with PhoneGap. This series is by Adobe evangelist Andrew Trice.

Personally, I am excited because we have a lot more content like these coming. However, we are always looking for your feedback. As always, you can add comments or ratings to each article, but also if there is a topic you really would like to see the ADC cover, you can always suggest it via our ADC feedback forum. Our goal on the ADC is to produce content that developers want and need, so we are open to any ideas, whether they are focused on an Adobe product or not.

- Brian Rinaldi

ADC Write & Give program – Q1 update

The Adobe Developer Connection (ADC) Write and Give Program gave $3,500 USD to charities in the first quarter of 2012. The program acknowledges the writing efforts of our ADC community authors by making a charitable contribution to a charity for each author who publishes content on the ADC. Each author chooses his or her charity from a list of five preselected charities (listed below).

To date the ADC has donated over $67,000 to these charities through the program in recognition of our ADC authors. To our ADC authors, we thank you for sharing your technical expertise with the greater developer community while helping other communities at the same time!

Read on to find out more about the charities that the program supports, and to see the list of authors for this quarter who made these contributions possible!

* Benetech: Creates new technology solutions that serve humanity and empower people to improve their lives.

* Nature Conservancy: Works around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.

* Mercy Corp: Alleviates suffering, poverty, and oppression by helping people build secure, productive, and just communities.

* Care: Fights global poverty by serving individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world.

* Feeding America: Is the nation’s largest charitable hunger-relief organization.

The authors who participated in this program from December 1, 2011 – February 29, 2012 are:

  • Tom Green
  • Dan Carr
  • Pete Freitag
  • Tommi West
  • José Carlos Rivera
  • Samir K. Dash
  • Keith Peters
  • Stephanie (Sullivan) Rewis
  • Quentin Thiaucourt
  • David Powers
  • Chris Converse

Thank you, authors, for your contributions to the ADC!

Announcing Business Catalyst Developer Center

Today we launched the new Business Catalyst Developer Center. Business Catalyst is an online business platform that integrates a set of essential web features into one hosted application. Website hosting, content management, e-commerce, e-mail marketing campaigns, and built-in user case management are all rolled into one, so you can build immersive sites and online stores quickly, at a fraction of the normal cost.

To learn more about this new hosted application, check out the following ADC and Adobe TV resources:

Give it a try and let us know what you think about Business Catalyst.

New content available in the Adobe Developer Connection

Lots of new goodness in the Adobe Developer Connection:

Tips for building AIR applications that can be easily updated: Note the potential pitfalls when building and deploying AIR application updates.

Using Flex Ant Tasks to build Flex projects – Part I: Creating a build script for Flex: Set up, create, and execute a basic Ant build script using the Adobe Flex Ant tasks.

Understanding Flex itemEditors – Part 2: Editing events and complex editors: Use events to make more complex itemEditors that do some simple data validation.

Flex cookbook spotlight: faqcontrib: Meet some of the regular contributors to the Flex Cookbook.

Search Engine Optimization Technology Center: The newly launched SEO Technology Center helps explain what the challenges are and provides practical steps, examples, and best practices that you can follow to overcome them.

Search optimization checklist for RIAs: Integrate search into the planning stages and production cycles you will encounter when developing RIAs.

Adobe Flash Player version checking protocol: Learn what to watch out for and what techniques to utilize to ensure that search engine spiders can enter your website’s front door.

Search optimization techniques for RIAs: Understand the challenges and adopt techniques to improve the relevance of your SWF content in search engine results.

Encoding options for H.264 video: Learn about H.264 video and encoding it for Flash Player delivery using Adobe Media Encoder or Flash Media Encoding Server.

Using timeline labels to dispatch events with the ActionScript 3.0 TimelineWatcher class: Use the TimelineWatcher class to programmatically monitor the timeline while keeping it separate from your application logic.

Foundation Fireworks CS4 excerpts: Visual effects and extending Fireworks: Create popular visual effects and understand the SWF panel development process to get the most out of Fireworks CS4.

ADC Write & Give Program: Learn how we acknowledge the writing efforts of our community authors by donating money to charities for each article they publish on the ADC.

Adobe Reader compatibility documentation: These documents provide guidance and important information regarding changes in Adobe Reader 9 that may affect enterprise workflows.

ADC Write and Give Program donates $3100 in Q1 of 2009

The Adobe Developer Connection (ADC) Write and Give Program gave $3,200 USD to charities in the first quarter of 2009. The program acknowledges the writing efforts of our ADC community authors by giving US$100 to a charity for each author’s published article on the ADC. Each author chooses his or her charity from a list of five preselected charities (listed below).

Last year the ADC donated $26,000 to these charities in recognition of our ADC authors. To our ADC authors, we thank you for sharing your technical expertise with the greater developer community while helping other communities at the same time!

Read on to find out more about the charities that the program supports, and to see the list of authors for this quarter who made these contributions possible!

* Benetech: Creates new technology solutions that serve humanity and empower people to improve their lives.

* Nature Conservancy: Works around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.

* Mercy Corp: Alleviates suffering, poverty, and oppression by helping people build secure, productive, and just communities.

* Care: Fights global poverty by serving individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world.

* Feeding America: Is the nation’s largest charitable hunger-relief organization.

The authors who participated in this program from December 1, 2008 – February 28, 2009 are:

• Joseph Lowery
• Stephanie Sullivan
• Roman Villareal
• Chris Converse
• Sean Moore
• Raymond Camden
• Davis Hassoun
• Karl Sigiscar
• Alex Cougarman
• Mike Brunt
• Bill Bejeck
• Pamela Fox
• Nick Mihailovski
• Jason Peters
• Paulo Caroli
• Dave Cronin
• Dan Carr
• David Gassner
• Tom Green

Thank you, authors, for your contributions to the ADC!