Posts in Category "Events"

September 17, 2014

Adobe Illustrator and touch computing

When Illustrator was first launched in 1987, it was a revolution. For the first time, designers had the freedom to create complex art on screen, thanks to Illustrator and the Macintosh computer. The traditional tools wielded by designers and illustrators — pencils, inking pens, French curves, and rulers — could now by replaced by keyboard, mouse and Illustrator!

 

The Adobe Illustrator story

With the move from traditional to digital tools, design became less of a struggle: Production is less of a barrier. Making changes doesn’t mean starting from scratch and redoing it all. Sending designs to a client only takes the click of a button. The same design that’s used for a magazine ad can be scaled up to billboard size without loss of quality.

But design is also less tactile now. You cannot wield a brush or touch your canvas. You cannot immerse yourself in the design process in the same way as before the computer. The computer has become both the design and the production tool. Mice and keyboards are now the primary interface; you cannot use your hands and fingers in a direct way.

Adobe believes that design, while a professional art which needs rigor and practice, should also be an exhilarating experience. One should be able to dive into it whenever inspiration strikes. It shouldn’t matter if you are in your design studio in front of your desktop computer or in a park under the sun with a portable device in your hand.

 

Microsoft Surface Pro 3: a powerful, portable device

 

We are excited about the touch-based 2-in-1 computer revolution gaining momentum around us. And we thought, what could be a better use of touch screens than letting designers push through the boundaries of mouse and keyboard and indulge physically in their creative work. Illustrator has been experimenting with touch for some time now; the Touch Type and Free Transform tools, along with support for the touch gestures that surfaced in Illustrator CC, were the result of a long-term vision to make Illustrator touch friendly.

 

Touch tools in Illustrator

 

However, Illustrator is not just a set of tools, but a complete design environment. To make Illustrator “touch friendly” meant more than enabling its tools for touch. It requires a complete touch-friendly design experience. Our customers must be able to complete their designs on touch devices without having to rely on a mouse or a touchpad. This also means packaging the overwhelmingly rich user interface of Illustrator into a simple and contextual workspace so it fits onto a screen portable enough to be carried around. And all of this without losing the richness and power that Illustrator offers today.

We wanted Illustrator to be simple yet powerful, touch friendly yet precise, and to fit on a portable device without losing any of its richness. This problem statement has formed the basis of all our touch efforts in Illustrator.

 

The solution is a touch workspace.

 

The Illustrator team has been working on a Touch Workspace, or TWS. It’s a special workspace in Illustrator that provides touch friendliness on a touch-enabled device, whether it’s stylus support, pressure sensitivity or cool gestures to manipulate art and canvas. It will also have simplified UI which must fit beautifully on a portable device.

TWS is a workspace within Illustrator itself, so we are sure that we are not compromising on the power or richness of Illustrator. Beneath a simple and playful touch-friendly interface, it’s the same Illustrator that we all trust. And, since it is a workspace, our customers are able to switch to and from it without having to close or save their documents.

 

See more at Adobe MAX

Adobe MAX 2014

 

The Illustrator team will be at Adobe MAX in a few weeks with a special session: Beyond Mouse and Keyboard: The Future of Touch and Adobe Illustrator. If you’re heading to MAX this year, be sure to sign up for this session and get an inside look into plans for the future.

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November 4, 2013

Ai Kawabata’s “Scarlet Peony and Courtesan (Oiran)”

With each release of Illustrator, we commission artists to create work to help showcase  the new features in the release. For Illustrator CC, we were excited to work with Ai Kawabata, a talented designer from Japan, a country famous for its distinctive, sophisticated design aesthetic.

"Scarlet Peony & Courtesan (Oiran)" by Ai Kawabata

“Scarlet Peony & Courtesan (Oiran)” by Ai Kawabata

“Red is the color of passion, and it’s one of my favorite colors. People are naturally drawn to red. It can be shocking, and it infuses an image with excitement and brightness.”
—AI KAWABATA

Ai Kawabata has loved drawing since she was a child. Ai Kawabata headshotLooking up at the play of colors in the late evening sky, Ai would wonder how she could express the depth and richness of what she saw. She layered colors on her drawing pad in an attempt to recreate the experience on paper. Her grandfather provided her with inspiration too, telling her that if she was passionate about drawing, she should use her gift and become a designer. Ai took his advice to heart, and now works as a designer and illustrator in Tokyo.

You can find our more about how Ai created this image by viewing the “How To” PDF. And you can also download the Illustrator file to further understand how AI built her final image. (note: this is a large file and will take some time to download).

We hope you enjoy Ai’s work as much as we do!

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August 1, 2013

HOW Designcast: What’s New in Adobe Illustrator CC. Recording Now Available.

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Discover What’s New in Illustrator CC — UPDATE

If you missed the live session with Rufus, you can view the recording of this webinar here

Join Rufus Deuchler, Senior Worldwide Evangelist for Design at Adobe, and get the scoop on what’s new in Adobe Illustrator CC.

Find out how you can leverage the new tools and Creative Cloud integration in Illustrator CC to design in more powerful, intuitive, and connected ways.

 

Want to see how you can start with a bitmap image like this…

Starting bitmap graphic

 

 

 

 

…and end up with a beautiful final graphic like the one below in just a few steps?

Final image using Images in brushes and Touch Type tool in Illustrator CC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then you need to a register for this free online session.

You’ll have time for direct Q&A with Adobe staff and Rufus during this session, too, so come with your Illustrator questions and the team will do their best to get you the answers you need.

Rufus is a graduate of the Art Center College of Design with a BFA in Communication Design, has worked as a corporate and editorial designer across Europe since 1992, and has taught graphic design since 1995. Based in Florence, Italy, Rufus brings a thorough understanding of creative software from a designer’s perspective.

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May 8, 2013

The New Touch Type Tool in Illustrator CC

Check out the new Touch Type tool in Illustrator with Terry White, Adobe Design Evangelist, as he shows how it works on the new Wacom Cintiq 22 HD Touch. You don’t need a direct touch device to use this new feature in Illustrator CC, but if you do, it makes the Touch Type tool even more intuitive and organic to use.

To see more about what’s new in Illustrator CC, please visit the Illustrator pages on Adobe.com.

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January 22, 2013

Illustrator CS6 Ask A Pro Session, Friday, 1/25, Noon PT

Illustrator Ask A Pro

Join Rufus Deuchler, senior worldwide design evangelist at Adobe, and see what Illustrator CS6 as part of Adobe Creative Cloud has in store for designers.

In this lively session, you’ll get a deeper take on Creative Cloud, and an even deeper dive into Illustrator CS6. Whether it’s get the inside look on how to use the newest features in Illustrator, polishing your skills on existing tools, or just getting a better understanding of what the Creative Cloud offering really means, this session will have something for you.

If you missed this Ask a Pro, you can view the recording here.

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