Posts tagged "Illustrator CC"

November 4, 2013

Ai Kawabata’s “Scarlet Peony and Courtesan (Oiran)”

With each release of Illustrator, we commission artists to create work to help showcase  the new features in the release. For Illustrator CC, we were excited to work with Ai Kawabata, a talented designer from Japan, a country famous for its distinctive, sophisticated design aesthetic.

"Scarlet Peony & Courtesan (Oiran)" by Ai Kawabata

“Scarlet Peony & Courtesan (Oiran)” by Ai Kawabata

“Red is the color of passion, and it’s one of my favorite colors. People are naturally drawn to red. It can be shocking, and it infuses an image with excitement and brightness.”
—AI KAWABATA

Ai Kawabata has loved drawing since she was a child. Ai Kawabata headshotLooking up at the play of colors in the late evening sky, Ai would wonder how she could express the depth and richness of what she saw. She layered colors on her drawing pad in an attempt to recreate the experience on paper. Her grandfather provided her with inspiration too, telling her that if she was passionate about drawing, she should use her gift and become a designer. Ai took his advice to heart, and now works as a designer and illustrator in Tokyo.

You can find our more about how Ai created this image by viewing the “How To” PDF. And you can also download the Illustrator file to further understand how AI built her final image. (note: this is a large file and will take some time to download).

We hope you enjoy Ai’s work as much as we do!

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September 5, 2013

Spotlight on Teri Pettit–a “developer’s developer”

Does the name Teri Pettit sound familiar? Many Illustrator customers remember seeing her name from the Illustrator splash screens over the years. For Throwback Thursday here’s a look back to an incredible engineer who’s has been associated with Illustrator since Illustrator 88.

Teri Pettit small

Teri Pettit joined Adobe Systems in 1987, but she’d already spent eight years at Xerox shaping the way we use (and see) our computers. As one of the original developers of the Xerox Star system, Teri helped introduce desktop icons and multiple windows to personal computing.

When she joined Adobe (and the Illustrator team) in 1987, she was joining other former Xerox employees like fellow developers Dick Sweet and Doug Brotz, making the switch because she wanted to work for a company where the contributions of her team were a little less… invisible. And Adobe wanted her to do that work on Illustrator.

Teri Pettit and Russell Brown from a booklet on Illustrator 88’s many uses.

Teri Pettit and Russell Brown from a
booklet on Illustrator 88’s many uses.

“It was getting pretty frustrating to feel that the work we were doing at Xerox was so invisible, with most of the public having no idea that our team had invented the whole desktop/icons/windows metaphor for personal computing,” said Teri. “The interview process felt more like they were trying to sell me on Adobe rather than probing my programming skills.”

Teri joined the team during the development of Illustrator 88, and remained a key member of the Illustrator team until she retired from Adobe in 2012. Teri is a developer’s developer, building the features she most wanted to see. Her favorite feature? Group blends, from Illustrator 8.

Teri not only understood the ins and outs of Illustrator, she helped others understand them, too. As a regular contributor to Illustrator user forums, her name became well known among Illustrator’s fans as she popped into forums, answering questions and providing technical insight.

Though she retired from Adobe in 2012 after 25 years on the Illustrator team, Teri’s legacy lives on anytime someone opens Illustrator or double-clicks a desktop icon.

teri-pettit-group-blends“[Group blends were] inspired by a postcard that Russell Brown made as a marketing giveaway for AI 88, with an angel made of lots of little strokes morphing into a devil in a similar style. Since AI 88’s blends could only be done one path at a time, the illustration required using the blend tool separately on each pair of matched strokes. So when I got the assignment to make blends ‘live’ in Illustrator 8, I took the opportunity to lobby for my pet group blends idea.”
—TERI PETTIT

 

 

 

Teri as Magenta at Adobe Halloween Costume Contest in 2002

Teri as Magenta at Adobe Halloween Costume Contest in 2002

 

MORDY GOLDING:
If you were an Illustrator tool, which one would you be?

 

TERI PETTIT:
Mordy, you ask the oddest questions. Nobody wants to be a tool.

 

 

Want to polish your Illustrator Blend tool skills? Check out the tutorials below.


 

vector tuts Illustrator blend tool guide   veerle's blog -- Illustrator full-spectrum spirographSunset blend tutorial by Teri Pettit

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August 29, 2013

The Illustrator Pen Tool

The debut of Adobe Illustrator in 1987 introduced the world to what has since become an icon of graphic design: the Pen tool.

Adobe Illustrator CC pen tools

The Pen tool was first shown widely to users in a video tutorial by Adobe cofounder John Warnock in 1987. Some users found the Pen tool difficult to master at first.

For designers used to analog tools, the new digital Pen tool in Illustrator was confounding, as it was not used to draw and sketch freely, but was used to plot and adjust “anchor points.” But for other designers who struggled to master the technical skills and techniques needed to control a traditional artist’s pen, the Pen tool in Illustrator was their new best friend, allowing them to create, edit and perfect their designs endlessly.

 

“The advantage of the Pen interface is it gave you absolute control over the curve. You didn’t draw a whole bunch of points and then hope the curve would look good. You could manipulate the curve to get the finest detail. It took some getting used to, but Illustrator is the tool of choice for graphic artists.”
—John Warnock

 

In many ways, the Pen tool is the most important tool in Illustrator. It is used to create the anchor points that form the basis for designs created in Illustrator, and to connect lines to those points that will create the curves and shapes that are the building blocks of Illustrator.

Like any artistic tool, the Pen tool takes some time to learn. But also like other artistic tools, it encourages creativity. The Pen tool is flexible and inspiring in its broad functionality.

 

Adobe Illustrator Pen tool icons

Want to polish your Illustrator Pen tool skills? Check out the tutorials below.


pen-tool-vector-tuts pen-tool-veerle-blog pen-tool-adobetv

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August 13, 2013

Top 5 Illustrator Tutorials on Vectortuts+ in July 2013

Vectortuts

Welcome to this months showcase of our favorite Adobe Illustrator tutorials available on Vectortuts+. Vectortuts+, part of the Tuts+ network, publishes tutorials, articles and more on all things vector! We publish tutorials on techniques and effects to make awesome vector graphics in Adobe Illustrator. My name is Sharon Milne, I’m the editor of Vectortuts+, and it is my pleasure to share with the  Illustrator community five of our most interesting and popular tutorials published during July 2013.

More…

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August 1, 2013

HOW Designcast: What’s New in Adobe Illustrator CC. Recording Now Available.

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Discover What’s New in Illustrator CC — UPDATE

If you missed the live session with Rufus, you can view the recording of this webinar here

Join Rufus Deuchler, Senior Worldwide Evangelist for Design at Adobe, and get the scoop on what’s new in Adobe Illustrator CC.

Find out how you can leverage the new tools and Creative Cloud integration in Illustrator CC to design in more powerful, intuitive, and connected ways.

 

Want to see how you can start with a bitmap image like this…

Starting bitmap graphic

 

 

 

 

…and end up with a beautiful final graphic like the one below in just a few steps?

Final image using Images in brushes and Touch Type tool in Illustrator CC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then you need to a register for this free online session.

You’ll have time for direct Q&A with Adobe staff and Rufus during this session, too, so come with your Illustrator questions and the team will do their best to get you the answers you need.

Rufus is a graduate of the Art Center College of Design with a BFA in Communication Design, has worked as a corporate and editorial designer across Europe since 1992, and has taught graphic design since 1995. Based in Florence, Italy, Rufus brings a thorough understanding of creative software from a designer’s perspective.

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