Life in the Fast Lane

Hisamichi with one of his prized motorcycles

Hisamichi with one of his prized motorcycles


Hisamichi K. has passion for marketing, Adobe, fast cars and sleek motorcycles. Recently promoted to oversee all of marketing for Adobe’s Japan and Asia Pacific (JAPAC) region, the speed racer sat down with Life@Adobe to discuss his new responsibilities, experiences, hobbies, and even some career advice for life in the fast lane.

Life@Adobe: When did you join Adobe?
Hisamichi: Back in 2010, a former co-worker asked if I would consider a marketing position with Adobe. The opportunity sounded interesting as I’ve always known Adobe to be a leading creative software company. I went for a few interviews and decided to take on the role in April 2011. The responsibilities and growth potential of the role were too good to pass up. It’s been one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. I truly enjoy working with the many talented people we have globally.

L@A: You were recently promoted from Senior Director of Marketing for Japan to Vice President of Marketing for JAPAC. How have your responsibilities changed?
Hisamichi: The biggest change is that my previous role was focused on the Japan market, whereas my current role encompasses both Japan and Asia Pacific. These days, the majority of my time is focused on getting better acquainted with the various markets and our Adobe employees in the APAC region. The people, culture, and markets in APAC are so diverse and fascinating. Each market has its own uniqueness, advantages and challenges. My job is to convey these opportunities to our head office, ensure we make the right investments and implement our business priorities.

L@A: You’ve been a marketing practitioner in various industries. How different are marketing approaches particularly in Information Technology (IT) where Adobe plays in?
Hisamichi: In my career, I’ve done branding and demand marketing for sporting goods, IT, film entertainment, and Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) companies. Compared to other industries, I must say that the IT industry seems more technically advanced in terms of marketing approaches.

Take Adobe as an example. When you look at the way Adobe incorporates digital marketing in our go-to-market strategy, there is a marked difference when compared to sporting goods and entertainment companies. These companies still rely heavily on traditional marketing using television and print ads. Digital marketing is still new to many companies in the sporting goods and movie/entertainment industries more so in Japan and APAC as compared to the U.S.. This holds a lot of potential for our Digital Marketing business.

L@A: What can we expect from Adobe this year?
Hisamichi: For many aspects of the business, this year is exciting for the JAPAC region. Our business is accelerating its transformation with the Creative Cloud rolling out in most of the region. We just finished our Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) roadshows where we had huge event attendance as we see an increasing interest in the solution. In the June to July timeframe, we’ll be gathering marketers from all over the region to participate in Adobe symposiums where we will introduce the latest Digital Marketing technologies.

L@A: You are well known in the Japan office for your amazing hobbies. Tell us more.
Hisamichi: I love cars and motorcycles. My cars and motorcycles consist of a couple of classic American muscle cars, a Japanese race car and a few Harleys and Ducatis. In the past, I participated in many Japanese and US amateur races, including Speed Trial at Bonneville, Utah, in 2004. I don’t do it as often now, but it’s always nice to take the car on the track. Ever since I was a kid, I was a motor freak. I was brought up on many American movies like Easy Rider and Vanishing Point and these movies fueled my passion.

L@A: Do you have any career advice or suggestions for others?
Hisamichi: A couple of things—and these seem obvious but are actually hard to do. First, do your best every day. I believe that if you do so, it will show up in your results. Secondly, be trustworthy and treat people as you would like to be treated. If you speak from your heart, your message gets through even in tough conversations.