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June 19, 2013

Why Follow a Tech Brand on Twitter : Adobe Reader

There are tons of articles on the web about who to follow, and what the average person on Twitter is looking for from big brands.  We’d like to just take a moment and provide a few reasons for why you, as a reader, should bother following a tech brand in the first place.

 

Tech Support

The customer service numbers are always the best place to start, but, if you can’t get your issue resolved, some brands’ social media teams can escalate your issue to the right people, or provide you with the correct answer themselves. If you follow the brand regularly, you might even see your question answered before you ask it.

Latest Updates & Releases

When an announcement or release is big enough, it will probably appear on a major news site. Where social media comes in handy is with the smaller releases, for example patches and updates. Sometimes, brands will write a post on their own blog and send out the announcement through Twitter, rather than alerting the media. Even small updates can be vital to your business, so following a brand on social media is a great way to stay up to date, and ensure you aren’t missing any important information.

Special Offers & Tips

Tech brands don’t offer giveaways as often as other industry brands, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get anything out of them. For tech brands the most valuable things they can give you are new features, tutorials, and improvements on their tools. We dare you to follow a tech brand for a whole month and not learn something new and useful about their products.

Promote Your Own Company

Bigger brands are often followed by more people. If you’re looking to get your company name out there more or increase your business through social media exposure, look for opportunities to get a popular brand to mention you.

Influence The Brand’s Future Decisions

Big brands spend huge amounts of money on market research, and guess what one of the biggest market indicators is now? You guessed it, sentiment on social media. If you come to the brand to vent or complain, you may get ignored; but if you offer constructive criticism that could help them improve their products, your tweet could be discussed in a brand strategy meeting someday.

Now we didn’t write this post just to get you to follow us on Twitter, but since you brought it up, stop by @Adobe_Reader today.  If you like what you see, just click that little follow button.

 

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12:54 PM Permalink
June 13, 2013

Updates to Adobe Reader Mobile

This week we’ve got a new release of the Adobe Reader Mobile app for Android and iOS. We’ve been reading all the reviews you’ve posted, and we’re happy to announce that we’ve worked in a couple often-requested features. We have three different platforms that we’ve just released, each with some unique enhancements.

File management for Acrobat.com files.

This has been a common request ever since we added both Cloud Storage and enhanced file management. It just took us a little longer to get the combination working together. Now you can delete and rename the files you have stored in Acrobat.com from directly within the Reader app.

View notes attached to text markups.

If your file has notes attached to the highlighted, underlined, or struck-out text, Reader will now show a ‘note’ icon to let you know that there’s a comment attached; just tap the icon to read it. In a future update we’ll also allow you to add a note to your own text highlights (right now, you can already add a comment anywhere on your document).

Updated iPhone UI

We’re adding more capabilities to our iPhone app, and we’ve outgrown the old bottom icon bar design. So we’ve moved to a new model with a sliding pane. Seeing this new design in action will make it much more clear than whatever we’d be able to describe here.

Access to your Acrobat cloud services. If you’re a subscriber to ExportPDF or CreatePDF, you can now take advantage of that subscription from within the Adobe Reader app on your iPhone or iPad. Just open the file you want to export from or convert to PDF and you’ll see an extra little button in the top menu bar. Track your file’s conversion progress in your Outbox (also new in this release). This will be coming to Android later this year, but we didn’t want to wait before letting our iOS users have it.

We’ve also made a couple of small improvements to our Android app that we think are worth mentioning, because they were direct customer comments that we addressed.

Keep your Cloud Cache private.

We want to keep an eye out for your data’s safety. The SD card of Android devices isn’t necessarily always safe from prying eyes, so we’ve moved our Acrobat.com cloud cache to the private data area so other apps can’t see the files unless you want them to. You can still move it back to the SD card if you really want to, though.

Open HTTP links

Our Android Reader can now directly handle links like https://path/file.pdf, so you can have Reader open PDFs without first downloading and locating the file on your device.

Performance improvements and Bug Fixes.

We’re always looking into fixing bugs and improving the performance of the app, and have fixed many of the issues that users have reported to us over the past few months. If you notice something that we haven’t, come to our forums to let us know what you’re thinking or experiencing!

Android forum

iOS forum 

Now that you know what’s on the line, get out there and update! Don’t forget to give us a review in the app stores or leave us a comment here on the blog; we always want to hear about how you’re using (or would like to use) Adobe Reader Mobile. What do you think we should include in the next release?

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5:23 PM Permalink
June 4, 2013

Raise your hand if you’re reading this on your smartphone right now.

Okay, well, we can’t see if you raised your hand or not. But we do know that many of you are doing lots of work from phones and tablets. We also know that every day there seem to be new ways to keep your productivity levels up, even if your laptop has crashed or you’re away from your desk. Our personal favorite (surprise, surprise) is to store all of our files in Acrobat.com, where we can access them from the Adobe Reader mobile app to read, make comments, and even add our signature to documents. It’s amazingly simple to find your cloud documents from a mobile device.

All that being said, we also realize that sometimes you are, in fact, on a laptop or desktop computer; so why should it be any more difficult to open your Acrobat.com files from Adobe Reader on your standard work machine? The answer is, it’s not: you can open up your Acrobat.com files from within Adobe Reader without ever opening a browser window. Just go to “File > Open…” in Adobe Reader and in the “Open” dialog box, select the option “Open from Online Account” and then choose “Acrobat.com”.

Screen Shot 2013-06#F375A92 (3)

You’ll be prompted to sign into your account; once you’ve logged in, you’ll see a list of all the files you’ve stored in Acrobat.com. You’ll be shown PDF files by default, but you can also choose to view all your files, PDF or not. You can search for a specific document with the search bar, or sort the visible documents by name, date, file size, and more.

Screen Shot 2013-06#F375A12 (3)

You can also access your files from the “Tools” pane whenever you’ve got another file open. Just expand the “Store Files” panel and click the link that says “Open Acrobat.com Files”. You’ll go through exactly the same process delineated above.

Screen Shot 2013-06#F375763 (3)

No matter whether you’re on the road or at your desk, Adobe Reader can put you in touch with all the important documents you’ve got stored in the cloud. Unfortunately, now you have no excuses not to get your work done.

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1:13 PM Permalink
May 23, 2013

Creating your own Bring Your Own Device Policy

In our previous blog post we showed you how using Acrobat.com will allow you to access your files on any device.  With the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) trend on the rise, this has never been more important. But is creating a BYOD policy really that simple?  Our fans on the Acrobat Facebook Page say, “No.”

byod

There are many things to consider in order to create a successful BYOD policy in your office. According to Good Technology and Dell’s Bring Your Own Devices Best Practice Guide, a successful policy requires not only the IT department to create it, but also collaboration among HR, finance, legal teams, executive teams, and business managers. Without the help of these other groups, it can be very difficult to decide how extensive your support will be among new devices, prepare for potential risks, budget for any necessary additional security measures and manage the program day-to-day.

Your policy should be molded to fit your company’s needs and resources, but you don’t need to start from scratch when building it. Whitehouse.gov has provided some great case studies and sample policies in their A Toolkit to Support Federal Agencies Implementing Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Programs. Most of these case studies are geared toward government processes, but they are still a very useful set of examples for the private sector.

Okay, so now you’ve done your research.  Where should you get started?  John Herrema from Forbes.com says that the most important thing to consider when writing your new policy is setting clearly defined goals and objectives. It’s very easy to get caught up in industry trends and implementation, but that is all much easier to handle if you have an objective to focus on.

Finally, what kind of Acrobat blog post would this be without a quick mention of how our software can help you accomplish your goals? Whether you need a full-blown BYOD program or not, the Adobe Reader Mobile app – available for iOS, Android, Windows 8 and more – and Acrobat.com can help give your employees more flexibility to work anywhere and on any device. IT professionals can also support BYOD program with support from Adobe for centrally-managing Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat on your users devices – including those with touch interfaces – using Citrix XenApp and Receiver. (If you haven’t seen Acrobat XI running on a touch screen, you’re missing out; we were practically giggling when we first saw the full power of Acrobat literally at our fingertips.)

We’d be interested to know how this BYOD process goes for you. Let us know in the comments what mobile goals your company sets (or would like to set) for your employees, and what challenges this trend creates for you.

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1:05 PM Permalink
May 14, 2013

Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.03), X (10.1.7) and 9.5.5

Today, we announced the availability of Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.03), X (10.1.7) and 9.5.5. For more information regarding the security details in these releases, please see Security Bulletin APSB13-15. For detailed Release Notes, please see the Enterprise Toolkit.

Adobe Reader and Acrobat 9 EOL
As a reminder, Adobe Reader and Acrobat 9 End-of-Life will occur next month. As stated in the Adobe Support Lifecycle Policy, Adobe provides five years of product support from the general availability date of Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat. In line with that policy, support for Adobe Reader 9.x and Adobe Acrobat 9.x will end on June 26, 2013.

End of Support
End of Support means that Adobe will no longer provide technical support or distribute runtimes, including product and/or security updates, for all derivatives of a product or product version (e.g. localized versions, minor upgrades, operating systems, dot and double-dot releases, and connector products).

Recommendation to Customers/Users
Adobe strongly recommends that customers update to the latest versions of Adobe Reader at: http://get.adobe.com/reader. By updating installations to the latest versions, customers benefit from the latest functional enhancements and improved security measures.

Additional Resources
For more information on the Adobe Support Lifecycle Policy, visit: http://www.adobe.com/support/products/enterprise/eol. For a complete list of Adobe products and technical support periods covered under the policy, visit: http://www.adobe.com/support/products/enterprise/eol/eol_matrix.html.

Steve Gottwals, Group Product Manager, Adobe Reader

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3:47 PM Permalink
April 18, 2013

Get to know Acrobat.com with Adobe Reader

Take a minute to think about the way you currently store and access your important PDF files. Maybe you’ve got an external hard drive that you carry around with you, or maybe you email documents to yourself and call that “cloud storage”. Maybe you just store them locally and hope your computer doesn’t crash. In any case, Acrobat.com and Adobe Reader can help you do better: any PDF document you’ve uploaded to Acrobat.com can be opened with Adobe Reader on your laptop, desktop, even your smartphone or tablet with the Adobe Reader mobile app. That means instant access across all your devices. Doesn’t that sound easier than scrolling through your inbox looking for a specific attachment? Yes, we think so too. Read on for details.

By now, you probably know that when you’ve got any file open in Reader, you can upload it to Acrobat.com just by clicking the “Upload” icon in the toolbar.

Upload to Acrobat.com

The Tools pane will open up and you can watch the upload’s progress. But maybe you didn’t know that you can also access those uploaded files (and all your other Acrobat.com files) from that same Tools pane: in the “Store Files” panel, notice the link marked “Open Acrobat.com Files”. If you’re signed in, you can click that link to pull up a window with all of the files you’ve stored in the cloud.

Open from Acrobat.com

You can even sort them or filter them if you need help finding a specific document:

  • Use the Search bar in the upper left to find a particular document by title or keyword; just start typing and the relevant documents will appear.
  • In the upper right, click the menu icon for viewing options. You can sort according to name, date, size, or format, and can filter out visible documents according to one or more of those same attributes.

Open from Acrobat.com

Once you start using Acrobat.com to store and access your files, we think you’ll get used to this method of cloud storage pretty quickly – especially because you won’t even have to open a browser to access the cloud.

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11:30 AM Permalink
March 4, 2013

Adobe Reader XI: Not just for reading anymore (Part II)

In our last post, we were talking about all the time-saving ways you could use Adobe’s online document services through Adobe Reader XI; now, we’d like to share just how to get that work done. But here’s the thing: there is no way to explain just how simple it is to use these services. Will that keep us from trying? No way. As soon as you catch on, feel free to open up Adobe Reader and try it yourself (we don’t think it will take you very long).

The key to using any of the services – with or without Adobe Reader – is your Adobe ID. It’s how you identify yourself to each service, and it’s how you sync all of your information between Reader, Reader Mobile, Acrobat.com, and any of the other services you’re using. (Don’t have one? Don’t worry. You can create one for free at any place you would otherwise sign in; you can even do so within Adobe Reader! Read on.) There are several ways to sign in from within Adobe Reader, but one of the quickest ways is to open up your Tools pane; here’s what that looks like:

  1. Click on “Tools” in the upper right corner of the application.
  2. Once the Tools pane is open, you’ll see a little blue bar at the top of the pane with a “Sign In” link. Click on that. (If you see your name there already, you’re already signed in – good work!)
  3. A pop-up window will appear where you’ll be able to sign in. If you don’t have an Adobe ID, you can create one with that same pop-up window.

Easy, right? And now that you’re signed in, you can access any of the services in that Tools pane. All of your subscriptions are associated with your Adobe ID, so if you’ve subscribed to one or more of the services, you’ll have those paid options available to you. Otherwise, you’ll have access to the services at their free or trial level, where available (for more info on pricing, see: Acrobat.com, SendNow, ExportPDF, CreatePDF.). Here’s how to access each of the services from Reader:

  1. Export a PDF file to Word or Excel by expanding the “Export PDF” panel. Choose the PDF file to convert (the document that’s currently open will be the default here), and choose the format you’d like to convert it to (.docx, .doc, .xls, or .rtf). Click on “Convert”, and watch the magic happen. When the conversion is finished, you’ll be prompted to save the converted file to your computer – or, if you prefer, directly to an Office 365 or SharePoint location. Want to give it a shot? Subscribe to ExportPDF.
  2. Create a new PDF file by opening up the panel marked “Create PDF”; just click to choose the file you’d like to use. As with ExportPDF, you can choose from locations on your computer or from an online location. Now click “Convert”. Give Adobe Reader a few seconds to communicate with the CreatePDF servers, and voila – you’ll get a prompt to open the newly converted PDF file in Adobe Reader. Have we even had to leave Adobe Reader yet? No. Convert your own files by subscribing to CreatePDF.
  3. When it comes to sending files with Adobe SendNow, you’ll see some options: choose the file and the recipient, and then write a message to be delivered along with the file. You can decide whether you’d like your recipient to sign in for access to the file; you can opt for delivery receipts to find out when the file has been downloaded; and you can limit the time that the file will be available for download. All without ever leaving the Adobe Reader window you’ve got open already. For the full range of features, try a SendNow subscription.
  4. Finally, open up that last panel to upload the current document to Acrobat.com for secure storage and access from any device; the free service includes 2 GB of storage space and hooks into Adobe Reader Mobile for reading on the road. You don’t even need a subscription for this service; just use your Adobe ID to access your own cloud storage account.

When we told you that Adobe Reader wasn’t just for reading anymore, maybe you thought that we were being facetious. We were not: Adobe Reader XI grants you access to all these services and more, and all you need to get started is an Adobe ID. Time to give Adobe Reader another look, people; see what this software can do to amp up your workflow and inject some more time into your day by downloading it for free.

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10:45 AM Permalink
February 25, 2013

Adobe Reader XI: Not just for reading anymore

Adobe Reader has been around for a while now – nearly 20 years, in fact. In those two decades, there have been a lot of changes, both in the digital document industry and in Reader itself. The most recent incarnation of Adobe Reader is without a doubt the most robust version yet, thanks in no small part to the fact that this Reader is no longer just for reading. With Adobe Reader XI, we’re bringing your work tools to where you’re doing your work; we’ve added a new Tools pane to help you access our online document services quickly and easily from within the Reader interface. Here’s what we’ve included to help you get your work done:

  • If you have a PDF file open and you want to make some changes to the content, you can export that PDF file to Word, Excel, and other formats using ExportPDF and continue your work in one of those natively editable formats. That includes scanned PDF files or image-only PDF files; even if you can’t search the file’s text, you can still export it. Instead of starting from scratch or manually copying and pasting text from the document, you can save time by converting to one of the formats that you edit documents with every day without skipping a beat.
  • When it comes time to convert that file back to PDF or to combine several files into a single PDF document, open up the “Create PDF” panel from the Tools pane and take advantage of the CreatePDF service to do just that. You can use CreatePDF to create and combine multiple files online and store those documents in the cloud from wherever you may be, and you can do it from Adobe Reader with just a few clicks.
  • When you’re looking at a PDF file that you want to distribute or share with colleagues and clients, you can send the document to them securely and track that document’s activity with Adobe SendNow. Your subscription will allow you to send documents of up to 2GB; you can even add custom branding to SendNow emails and download pages. Definitely beats sending a hard drive via overnight mail!
  • What about those times when you’re halfway through a 200-page document but you’ve got to leave the office? With a single click you can upload that document to Acrobat.com and access the file (at whatever page you left it on) from the Acrobat.com folder in Adobe Reader Mobile for iOS or Android. Acrobat.com lets you access all of your files from virtually any device, whenever you need them; why stay bound to a desk when Adobe Reader can follow you wherever you go, and Acrobat.com always has your files stored securely in the cloud?

Adobe Reader XI makes all of this happen directly from the Tools pane, your personal portal to productivity. Take a look at your options by clicking on “Tools” in the upper right corner of Reader the next time you open a document; you’ll be amazed at the things you can do. All you need to get started is an Adobe ID, which is free to create; sign in or create your ID through the Tools pane to see what these services can do for you and your workflow.

Next week, we’ll get granular and go over the how-to for each of the tools available to you in Reader; tune in to get the good news!

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10:45 AM Permalink
February 20, 2013

Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.02), X (10.1.6) and 9.5.4

Today, we announced the availability of Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.02), X (10.1.6) and 9.5.4. For more information regarding the security details in these releases, please see Security Bulletin APSB13-07. For detailed Release Notes, please see the Enterprise Toolkit.

Steve Gottwals, Group Product Manager, Adobe Reader

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6:23 PM Permalink
January 8, 2013

Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.01), X (10.1.5) and 9.5.3

Today, we announced the availability of Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.01), X (10.1.5) and 9.5.3. For more information regarding the security details in these releases, please see Security Bulletin APSB13-02. For detailed Release Notes, please see the Enterprise Toolkit.

Adobe Reader XI Deployment Kit for App-V
With the 11.0.01 update, we’ve also released two tools to help virtualize Adobe Reader on Microsoft App-V. The tools include a Package Accelerator and an App-V Reader MSI, which installs a few DLLs and registry entries to support shell extensions, browser integration, and PDF ownership. The tools work with Reader 11.0.01 and App-V 4.6. See the App-V Deployment section of the Enterprise Administration Guide for more information.

New Updater Mode Added to Acrobat XI for Windows
Just like the Adobe Reader updater, the Adobe Acrobat XI for Windows updater now has a fully-automated mode. As a reminder, “fully-automated” mode will regularly check for important updates, download them to your machine, and install them automatically. When finished, you will be alerted via a small message in the system tray that your software has been updated. This method is the recommended best practice for keeping Adobe Acrobat up-to-date and more secure given the fact that it does not require user intervention.

Handling Flash in 10.1.5
As mentioned in Three Common Adobe Reader and Acrobat Security Questions, unknown Flash will now be rendered by the system Flash Player (NPAPI version), when using Adobe Reader and Acrobat 10.1.5. Note: This has already been done for Reader and Acrobat 11. As stated before, this means that Adobe Reader/Acrobat users will no longer have to update Adobe Reader/Acrobat each time we update the Flash Player. This is particularly beneficial to customers in managed environments, because fewer updates means a lower cost of ownership, while maintaining a vigilant security posture.

Adobe Reader and Acrobat 9 EOL
Please note, as stated in Adobe Reader and Acrobat 9 EOL, support for Adobe Reader 9.x and Adobe Acrobat 9.x will end on June 26, 2013.

Steve Gottwals, Group Product Manager, Adobe Reader

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6:13 PM Permalink