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April 29, 2014

Adobe Reader: The Perfect Study Tool for Finals Week

reader blog 1

College students know all too well what time of year is fast approaching – Finals Week! Since we can’t buy each and every one of you a mega-sized cup of your caffeinated-beverage-of-choice for those imminent all-night study sessions, we thought, why not try to help you avoid all-nighters all together?  Or at least unnecessary stress.  Here’s a list of Adobe Reader tips and tricks we compiled to help you sort through those lengthy PDFs your professors assigned to read over the course of the semester. Adobe Reader is a free service, so be sure to take advantage.

  1. The Read Aloud Function- Are your eyes zapped or are you too tired to actually read what you were assigned? Let Reader
    read your PDFs for you. Or even better, if you turn any of your final papers into a PDF, have Reader proofread it using the read aloud function to pick up on any grammatical errors.
  2. The Highlighter Tool- Just like you would in any text book, highlight important phrases, sentences or definitions to easily refer back to so you’re not wasting time searching through text for the important stuff.
  3. The Typewriter Tool- Quickly add comments to your PDF for note taking with Reader’s Typewriter tool. Just select the Add Text Comment tool from the Comments panel, click the Add Text Comment tool, click the page where you want to add your text, and type away.
  4. The Comments Tool- If you’re working on a group project, the comment tool might be the better way to go. It makes collaboration much easier because there is no need to print and mark up.
  5. Reader for Mobile- Don’t be confined to the library, take your files with you wherever you go to maximize your study hours.

With these tools, there’s no need to hit the panic button when you see a 150 page PDF file.  Even better, these are only just a few of the tools Reader offers for its users. Check them all out here.  Most importantly—good luck with finals! We know you’ll ace them all with Adobe Reader in your back pocket.

College                  reader blog 2

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7:21 PM Permalink
January 14, 2014

Latest Adobe Reader and Acrobat Quarterly Updates Now Available

Adobe has released updates for Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.06) and Adobe Reader and Acrobat X (10.1.9). You will be able to update your system to the latest versions from the built-in updater or by downloading the patch from the Adobe website. You can find out what is in these updates from these release notes for each version. IT professionals can get more details on the update and deploying it across their organization from the Enterprise Toolkit for Acrobat products.

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8:14 PM Permalink
September 10, 2013

Adobe Reader and Acrobat Quarterly Updates Now Available

Adobe has released updates for Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI (11.0.04) and Adobe Reader and Acrobat X (10.1.8). You will be able to update your system to the latest versions from the built-in updater or by downloading the patch from the Adobe website. You can find out what is in these updates from these release notes for each version. IT professionals can get more details on the update and deploying it across their organization from the Enterprise Toolkit for Acrobat products.

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4:57 PM Permalink
September 5, 2013

Take control of your Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Reader updates

One of the most frequent conversations we see online about Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader are about updates. When their software is running smoothly, many users wonder why there are updates at all. To help keep everyone in the loop on why we update when we do, here are a few thoughts on what makes these updates crucial to the health of your software.

 

Why should you update?

The most important reason for updating your Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Reader software is security. These updates safeguard your system against malicious attacks that may be executed through universally-used PDF files. Updates also improve basic functionality and features associated within Acrobat and Reader, including addressing any lingering bugs.

Why are there so many updates?

Actually, since Acrobat and Adobe Reader version 10.1 we have only released updates on a quarterly basis, following Microsoft’s model of a “Patch Tuesday” (see http://helpx.adobe.com/acrobat/release-note/release-notes-acrobat-reader.html) Only once have we had to release an “out-of-cycle” patch that fell between these quarterly releases (in February of 2013). Also, these quarterly updates are cumulative so you don’t have to install multiple updates to get to the current version and keep your system and files safe. If you do receive multiple update messages, just make sure the last update did fully install.

Taking control of updates

Although we don’t recommend it (unless you’re an IT wizard managing controlled desktops within an organization), some of you probably prefer to update your Acrobat or Reader software yourselves instead of having Adobe run the updates for you. In that case, you’ll need to disable the automatic updates. Just, you know… remember to run the updates – maybe if you’re going out to lunch, take a few minutes to get the installation going. When you get back, Acrobat and Reader will be ready to go with the most up-to-date version installed.

 

Now that you get the logic of updating your Acrobat and Reader software, we hope you’ll install the updates as we publish them. Unfortunately, we do occasionally hear from people who are trying their best to update, but run into some trouble when they try to install the new software. If you find yourself scratching your head over an Acrobat or Reader update, below are some troubleshooting steps and remedies for you to try:

For Mac users:

  • Reinstall Reader or Acrobat.
  • See this link for instructions on how to do this.
  • Follow these steps if installation “hangs” (stalls).

For Windows users:

If reinstalling Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader is the route you have to go to make sure you have the latest version, the Adobe Cleaner tool is a great thing to know about. The Adobe Reader and Acrobat Cleaner Tool is designed to fix corrupt installations, files, and changing permission registry entries – scary-sounding stuff, we know; all you really need to know is that the Cleaner Tool can take care of the messy behind-the-scenes to make sure that your reinstallation goes smoothly.

 

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12:58 PM Permalink
July 17, 2013

Reader XI and Application Security: Are you sure you want to open that PDF file?

Wouldn’t it be great to live in a world where we could open any email or attachment without worry? Unfortunately, hackers attack in a variety of ways, and one of their favorite tactics is putting malicious code in files that people open and work with regularly. Their goal is to gain entry to systems – and to your valuable data. PDF has become a universally adopted file type for documents, data and intellectual property, thanks to its status as a freely available published standard that developers have used to create their own PDF viewing and creation software. This means, in worst-case scenarios, that viruses or Malware (short for malicious software) can be inserted into a PDF to allow an attacker to gather your sensitive information, gain access to your networks, or completely disrupt your computer operation. Yes, it sounds dismal, but don’t worry: you’re not defenseless! When you’re reading or working with PDF files, you should consider a Reader that protects your documents and systems, as noted in this White Paper on minimizing your risk.

 

Application Security is comprised of many features, one of which is called “sandboxing”.  In technical terms, a Sandbox is a controlled set of resources that separates running programs on your computer. If you run a program within a sandbox, the chances of compromising your data or systems are greatly reduced. Given that we don’t live in a hacker-free world (see above), and that we know a thing or two about reading PDF files, we’ve made extensive investments in Adobe Reader XI to protect you from attacks within a PDF file; one investment is to include industry-leading sandboxing technology that is built in to the software, and protects you from attacks that try to read or write to your systems. Adobe Reader XI also has to ability to designate appropriate Javascript that can run within the PDF files you open, called whitelisting and blacklisting. Additionally, predictable and streamlined patching features are available in Adobe Reader XI, along with improved deployment tool support and documentation. For those of you who are more technically minded, take a look at this White Paper on how Adobe Reader XI has taken security to new levels.

 

While we may not yet live in a world where we can whole-heartedly trust every email attachment we receive, you can still read easy knowing that you can securely open any PDF file with Adobe Reader XI. All that and it’s FREE too!

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1:08 PM Permalink
June 26, 2013

Standards at Adobe: Alignment of Adobe-Approved Trust List (AATL) and EU Trust List (EUTL)

Within Europe and indeed elsewhere, digital signature technology is a valuable tool for conducting secure transactions via electronic documents. For years now, Adobe has invested in making such technology readily available to all citizens through the free Adobe Reader and Acrobat. This includes working with the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) to develop the technical specification for PDF Advanced Electronic Signature (PAdES) – that was incorporated into Adobe Reader and Acrobat in 2009 – and developing the Adobe-Approved Trust List (AATL). The AATL that is also part of the hundreds of millions of instances of Adobe Reader and Acrobat out there today helps ensure qualified certificates issued by Certification Service Providers can validate digital signatures without having to always manually import and manage certificates (although that option is still possible).
Trusted Certificate Settings dialog box in Adobe Acrobat XI
The Standards team at Adobe see the next logical step of this technology to be the integration of the EU Trust List into Adobe Acrobat and Reader software. To help explain this to our customers and followers, and what ETSI’s June 19 announcement of Trusted Lists means, check out this article written by Adobe’s Steve Gottwals, Group Product Manager and John Jolliffe, Senior Manager for European Government Affairs.

As always, if you have any comments or questions, please let us know.

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12:55 PM Permalink
June 21, 2013

Adobe Reader and Acrobat Cleaner Tool update now available

Most desktop software applications rely upon a number of components within and beyond the operating system. For this reason installing, updating, and uninstalling these applications should go smoothly, and most do. On rare occasions a user may not be able to complete these tasks due to some registry or file conflict or permissions issue on the machine.

The Adobe Reader and Acrobat Cleaner Tool for Windows is designed to help IT and support professionals fix such issues and enable the successful installation of subsequent new installs or updates. It does so by removing standalone installations of these products (for version 9 and higher), including removing corrupted files, and removing or changing permissions on registry entries, even after a standard uninstall. The tool also provides options for removing problematic Acrobat items only while leaving Adobe Reader untouched, and vice versa, so that workflows are not broken. Additionally, it has both a user interface and command-line mode, both of which are documented.

You can download this tool for free from the Enterprise IT Tools for Adobe Acrobat and Reader page
on Adobe Labs. Please note that although we are releasing these tools free of charge, like other technologies on Adobe Labs, they do not come with an official support program.

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12:59 PM Permalink
June 19, 2013

Why Follow a Tech Brand on Twitter : Adobe Reader

There are tons of articles on the web about who to follow, and what the average person on Twitter is looking for from big brands.  We’d like to just take a moment and provide a few reasons for why you, as a reader, should bother following a tech brand in the first place.

 

Tech Support

The customer service numbers are always the best place to start, but, if you can’t get your issue resolved, some brands’ social media teams can escalate your issue to the right people, or provide you with the correct answer themselves. If you follow the brand regularly, you might even see your question answered before you ask it.

Latest Updates & Releases

When an announcement or release is big enough, it will probably appear on a major news site. Where social media comes in handy is with the smaller releases, for example patches and updates. Sometimes, brands will write a post on their own blog and send out the announcement through Twitter, rather than alerting the media. Even small updates can be vital to your business, so following a brand on social media is a great way to stay up to date, and ensure you aren’t missing any important information.

Special Offers & Tips

Tech brands don’t offer giveaways as often as other industry brands, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get anything out of them. For tech brands the most valuable things they can give you are new features, tutorials, and improvements on their tools. We dare you to follow a tech brand for a whole month and not learn something new and useful about their products.

Promote Your Own Company

Bigger brands are often followed by more people. If you’re looking to get your company name out there more or increase your business through social media exposure, look for opportunities to get a popular brand to mention you.

Influence The Brand’s Future Decisions

Big brands spend huge amounts of money on market research, and guess what one of the biggest market indicators is now? You guessed it, sentiment on social media. If you come to the brand to vent or complain, you may get ignored; but if you offer constructive criticism that could help them improve their products, your tweet could be discussed in a brand strategy meeting someday.

Now we didn’t write this post just to get you to follow us on Twitter, but since you brought it up, stop by @Adobe_Reader today.  If you like what you see, just click that little follow button.

 

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12:54 PM Permalink
June 13, 2013

Updates to Adobe Reader Mobile

This week we’ve got a new release of the Adobe Reader Mobile app for Android and iOS. We’ve been reading all the reviews you’ve posted, and we’re happy to announce that we’ve worked in a couple often-requested features. We have three different platforms that we’ve just released, each with some unique enhancements.

File management for Acrobat.com files.

This has been a common request ever since we added both Cloud Storage and enhanced file management. It just took us a little longer to get the combination working together. Now you can delete and rename the files you have stored in Acrobat.com from directly within the Reader app.

View notes attached to text markups.

If your file has notes attached to the highlighted, underlined, or struck-out text, Reader will now show a ‘note’ icon to let you know that there’s a comment attached; just tap the icon to read it. In a future update we’ll also allow you to add a note to your own text highlights (right now, you can already add a comment anywhere on your document).

Updated iPhone UI

We’re adding more capabilities to our iPhone app, and we’ve outgrown the old bottom icon bar design. So we’ve moved to a new model with a sliding pane. Seeing this new design in action will make it much more clear than whatever we’d be able to describe here.

Access to your Acrobat cloud services. If you’re a subscriber to ExportPDF or CreatePDF, you can now take advantage of that subscription from within the Adobe Reader app on your iPhone or iPad. Just open the file you want to export from or convert to PDF and you’ll see an extra little button in the top menu bar. Track your file’s conversion progress in your Outbox (also new in this release). This will be coming to Android later this year, but we didn’t want to wait before letting our iOS users have it.

We’ve also made a couple of small improvements to our Android app that we think are worth mentioning, because they were direct customer comments that we addressed.

Keep your Cloud Cache private.

We want to keep an eye out for your data’s safety. The SD card of Android devices isn’t necessarily always safe from prying eyes, so we’ve moved our Acrobat.com cloud cache to the private data area so other apps can’t see the files unless you want them to. You can still move it back to the SD card if you really want to, though.

Open HTTP links

Our Android Reader can now directly handle links like https://path/file.pdf, so you can have Reader open PDFs without first downloading and locating the file on your device.

Performance improvements and Bug Fixes.

We’re always looking into fixing bugs and improving the performance of the app, and have fixed many of the issues that users have reported to us over the past few months. If you notice something that we haven’t, come to our forums to let us know what you’re thinking or experiencing!

Android forum

iOS forum 

Now that you know what’s on the line, get out there and update! Don’t forget to give us a review in the app stores or leave us a comment here on the blog; we always want to hear about how you’re using (or would like to use) Adobe Reader Mobile. What do you think we should include in the next release?

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5:23 PM Permalink
June 4, 2013

Raise your hand if you’re reading this on your smartphone right now.

Okay, well, we can’t see if you raised your hand or not. But we do know that many of you are doing lots of work from phones and tablets. We also know that every day there seem to be new ways to keep your productivity levels up, even if your laptop has crashed or you’re away from your desk. Our personal favorite (surprise, surprise) is to store all of our files in Acrobat.com, where we can access them from the Adobe Reader mobile app to read, make comments, and even add our signature to documents. It’s amazingly simple to find your cloud documents from a mobile device.

All that being said, we also realize that sometimes you are, in fact, on a laptop or desktop computer; so why should it be any more difficult to open your Acrobat.com files from Adobe Reader on your standard work machine? The answer is, it’s not: you can open up your Acrobat.com files from within Adobe Reader without ever opening a browser window. Just go to “File > Open…” in Adobe Reader and in the “Open” dialog box, select the option “Open from Online Account” and then choose “Acrobat.com”.

Screen Shot 2013-06#F375A92 (3)

You’ll be prompted to sign into your account; once you’ve logged in, you’ll see a list of all the files you’ve stored in Acrobat.com. You’ll be shown PDF files by default, but you can also choose to view all your files, PDF or not. You can search for a specific document with the search bar, or sort the visible documents by name, date, file size, and more.

Screen Shot 2013-06#F375A12 (3)

You can also access your files from the “Tools” pane whenever you’ve got another file open. Just expand the “Store Files” panel and click the link that says “Open Acrobat.com Files”. You’ll go through exactly the same process delineated above.

Screen Shot 2013-06#F375763 (3)

No matter whether you’re on the road or at your desk, Adobe Reader can put you in touch with all the important documents you’ve got stored in the cloud. Unfortunately, now you have no excuses not to get your work done.

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1:13 PM Permalink