Posts tagged "Summit Insiders"

Summit Insider: Elisabeth Osmeloski on marketing and the role of SEO

Our Summit Insiders is a collection of marketing experts whom we’ve invited to join us on the ground at Summit to share their insights, observations and experience via social media, blogging and other digital outlets. We sat down with Elisabeth Osmeloski, one of our Insiders to talk about marketing, reinvention (the theme of this year’s Summit) and more. Here’s what she had to say:

Elisabeth_InsiderDigital marketing changes each and every day. How do you consistently reinvent yourself to meet the ever-changing demands of this industry? 
Good question! The biggest challenge for most people in the industry is just keeping up with the change when change happens at an alarming rate. For many I know (and myself included), several hours of nearly every day are carved out just for scanning headlines and reading updates from reputable industry sites as well as platform and product blogs that may affect their current marketing campaigns.

For digital marketers to keep up, it’s imperative that we stay up to date on new features offered by search and social platforms, so they can begin to strategize how to best leverage those for their company’s efforts. On top of that, they also need to be aware of upgrades and changes to the vendor tools they use on a daily, weekly or monthly basis.

Finally, everyone needs to take a step back and look at the big picture of how everything in digital works together – from every angle, including personalization and privacy, social and mobile technology, to name just a few. That’s where trusted marketing technology news sites (like our own Marketing Land & Search Engine Land of course, but several others as well) as well as mainstream media and business publications come in handy to quickly surface the bigger issues.

But in order to reinvent yourself (and particularly useful if you’ve been ‘stuck’ in a single vertical for a long time) – I do think it’s important to draw inspiration from other industries and to try to take a look at what they’re doing with a fresh eye, so you can bring those learnings into your own strategies.

How do you see the role of SEO evolving in the next five years?
SEO has been evolving since the day it was invented – but the real potential for search engine optimization over the next few years is a renewed focus on information architecture to better take advantage of structured data. As search platforms continue to try to better understand query intent and are finally making strides in semantic search, structured data is helping inform algorithms of who, what, when, where, why and how – publishers have an opportunity to influence this from the ground up.

However, in the age of ‘direct and instant’ answers for top level queries, SEO is going to have to find new opportunities to be discovered in search, and get the click through from search results. One of the biggest challenges for SEO continues to be the fight for credit and traffic / ROI attribution. In a world of [not provided] keywords, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to track results at scale. For that reason, it’s also likely that SEO might just be folded into a bigger marketing role as all websites become ‘content publishers’.

There’s also the concept that search happens in other formats beyond the desktop – not just on mobile, but within mobile apps, on wearables and in voice search for example – ‘optimizing’ for those results will be another opportunity for marketers to capture audience attention.

What skills do you think are going to be imperative for digital marketers to have in the future?
For the creative side of the marketing table, it’s become obvious that using to data to inform your marketing strategies is what’s going to matter most. Being able to build a scalable strategy, test and measure results at every stage, and adjust accordingly is ultimately what is going to drive the success of all marketing. Add the complication of needing to do this effectively in ‘real-time’, using a mix of technology platforms and human interaction. Adaptability and agility are the keywords.

What advice would you someone entering into the digital marketing industry?
My advice is to pick at least one specialty to focus on and become a true expert in that area – whether that’s organic search, paid advertising, email marketing, social media, content development or analytics. But do keep yourself well informed on all the other aspects of digital so that you have a deeper understanding of how to leverage other opportunities and more importantly, work with other members of your team and in other business units around your company.

More about Elisabeth Osmeloski 
Elisabeth Osmeloski is Director of Audience Development for Marketing Land and Search Engine Land, two of the leading trade publications in the digital marketing space. She is responsible for increasing readership through owned, earned and paid media channels. As part of her role on the editorial team, she assists in programming SEO and related digital marketing sessions at Third Door Media’s Search Marketing Expo conference series. Elisabeth also co-founded SLCSEM.org – a local association for Utah based search and digital marketing professionals.

Summit Insider: Toby Bloomberg on Marketing’s Similarity to Kinetic Art and Becoming a Blogging Diva

Yesterday, we introduced this year’s Summit Insiders. Summit Insiders is a collection of marketing experts whom we’ve invited to join us on the ground at Summit to share their insights, observations and experience via social media, blogging and other digital outlets. We sat down with Toby Bloomberg, one of our Insiders to talk about marketing, reinvention (the theme of this year’s Summit) and more. Here’s what Toby had to say:

toby_insiderWhat advice would you give you give to those starting in the digital marketing industry?
In three words: Integration times two.

I like to compare digital marketing to kinetic art … multiple pieces are integrated to create movement. In the digital marketing world the interlocking pieces might look like this: social supports SEO -which supports content development-which supports-mobile which supports website analytics and on and on and on. If an element breaks or is not optimally integrated a chain reaction occurs which impacts not only the brand value but your customers’ experiences.

As digital continues to evolve the decision process of which tool to include in your strategies becomes increasingly complex.  Will incorporating augmented reality help your customers better understand your product? Or is it wearable computers or sensor technology what will add value?  How do you determine where resources should be dedicated? That’s where setting visionary but practical goals and understanding your target audience serves as your ‘north star.’

However, integration is not limited to ensuring the right channels and tactics will move the brand forward.  Integration also involves internal communication processes. For many organizations their structure is to create internal silos of subject matter experts (fondly called SMEs). For sure, one person can’t know everything. However, too frequently these groups are housed in different departments and report to different people within the senior leadership team.  Creating and putting meaningful processes into a work environment is not always simple; but if not developed, results can be devastating from brand disconnect, frustrated employees to the ultimate … customer loss.

Communication, especially among this group of employees, is not a nice to have but a critical business practice that must be open, trusting and frequent.  In the best of worlds, a minimum level of senior leadership would include a VP of Strategic Digital Marketing Integration who holds responsibility for customer experience. Integration time two leads to bottom-line success but only through deliberate planning.

How has blogging helped your personal business?
When Diva Marketing Blog was launched in 2004, it was the beginning of an exciting  new wave of business communication. Since I was early to the game, Diva Marketing set me apart from traditional marketing strategists by positioning me as someone who held an innovative approach towards to the new and often confusing world of interactive marketing.

I quickly realized benefits from investing time and resources creating original content far exceeded a unique positioning. The blog gave me an interactive platform to test new concepts like an eBook I wrote based on Twitter interviews. I crowd sourced issues like blogger/influencer relationships that led to new insights shared by an extended community. Diva Marketing opened doors that extended my network to include colleagues from as close as the next town to India and Australia. Some people were from small businesses and nonprofits and others from Fortune 500 corporations.

The most import advantage that came from Diva Marketing was that it helped establish and reinforce my credibility for the work I wanted to pursue.  In the world of today’s social networks e.g. Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram … you know the drill, it’s challenging to build a thought leader position through a series of sound bites. It takes longer, more meaningful content along with sharing your point of view to establish trust and confidence. Today the content might not be only from a traditional blog but perhaps a series of videos, podcasts or presentations uploaded to Slideshare. Social networks then become a supplementary resource to expand, promote and discuss your ideas.

All good you but ‘show me the money’ you might say. Remember those relationships I mentioned? They led to the money. The relationships that I build through blogs and social networks resulted in projects, speaking engagements, eventually a full time job with a major media corporation, my being part of Adobe’s Insider program and maybe the next. It’s interesting to think in this world of high technology high touch and personal relationships are still what make the wheels of business go-round.

You grew up with your Dad in the marketing research business. How do you think the business has changed since that time and in what ways has it remained the same?
Thanks for the shout-out about my dad. His business was primary data collection so my response will reflect that aspect of research instead of secondary website/social network insights or my response might be a book! Let’s start with the end (of your question) at the beginning of my answer. Good research focuses on determining what issue must be addressed in order to make smart business decisions. That remains the same.  However, technology has certainly impacted the market research game from both a positive and negative perspective.

On the plus side, data collection is easier to obtain and response rates are usually high. Costs are lower and return of the information is crazy fast. You can often see raw results in real time.  From a social media lens, the doors have swung wide open for organizations to create on-going ‘listening’ programs. The ‘back yard’ conversations of unfiltered, raw voices are often rich in passion and emotion that might not be found in traditional research. More companies are using consumer generated content as early warning signs of service and product concerns, as well as, to identify brand champions. In addition, new mobile apps like Jelly might be the way to check the consumer’s pulse for new product development.

On the minus side, free survey software turned everyone and anyone into a ‘researcher.’ With limited understanding of how to craft the ‘right’ questions, and as important no one on staff to analyze the data, companies frequently make critical decisions based on ‘garbage-in/garbage-out’ reports. One might say .. you get what you pay for.

In social media listening programs we often pay attention to voices who are the loudest (or most frequent) or those with a perceived high social media influence factor. These people may not be a fair representation of your customer-based. Far reaching decisions about product development, marketing or advertising programs may be impacted by perceptions that are not based on the truths of the majority of your customers or prospects.

Reaching out to individuals and as the saying goes “join in the conversation” or connecting through private direct messaging may not be statically valid but might be invaluable as a means of gaining qualitative insights. Leverage social comments and discussions as a starting point to build traditional research studies that will confirm and extend the learnings about your customers. Listen, hear, participate and use social research as strategically as you do traditional research.

More about Toby Bloomberg
Toby Bloomberg is recognized for her expertise in combining social media with traditional marketing values (strategy, customer insights, segmentation) while maintaining digital conversation authenticity.  Her adventures in social media began in 2004 with the launch of her award winning blog Diva Marketing. She has worked with Fortune 100 brands and small business in both B2B, B2C, as well as, nonprofits.  Most recently Toby held the position of director of social media integration for Cox Digital Media where she supported a portfolio of over 70 TV, radio and newspapers properties in using social media as a catalyst to build stronger brand-to-audience relationships.

You can follow Toby on Twitter at @TobyDiva, or read her blog at Diva Marketing.

Summit Insider: Travis Wright on Marketing Technology Stacks, CMTOs, Awesomeization and Reinvention

Earlier today, we introduced this year’s Summit Insiders. Summit Insiders is a collection of marketing experts whom we’ve invited to join us on the ground at Summit to share their insights, observations and experience via social media, blogging and other digital outlets. We sat down with Travis Wright, one of our Insiders to talk about marketing, reinvention (the theme of this year’s Summit) and more. Here’s what Travis had to say:

travis_wright

Throughout your career you’ve had a great deal of diverse experience. How do you think this has helped you continuously reinvent yourself?
Reinvention is critical in this space. When I started in the mid-90s, I was selling yellow page ads with GTE, which later became Verizon. I learned early on that most businesses didn’t “get” the Internet yet. So, if you were in Kansas City and were a plumber, you’d better register KCPlumber.com or something similar. SEO was something I figured out intuitively before Google was even invented. I’ve always made a point of figuring out what is coming next and positioning myself in that sweet spot.

Then paid search came along with Goto.com and Overture, and I needed to gain a grasp on this for my clients. So I kept learning and optimizing my knowledgebase. Social media came along in the early 2000s, and I even did a few marketing experiments on Friendster! Remember them? Then mobile marketing came along and now we have marketing technology stacks.

So, the theme of my reinvention is always looking forward, understanding where the market is heading, and gaining the necessary knowledge and skill sets to be effective in both the current landscape and the next frontier of marketing.

How do you see the digital marketing industry evolving in the next five years?
This is something that I’ve spent a wealth of time thinking about what’s coming in the next 3-5 year. In 2012, Gartner said, “The CMO is going to have larger budgets than I.T. moving forward in 2017.” Thus, I think the buzz phrase for 2015 and beyond is the “Marketing Technology Stack”. Some companies are getting it now, but I believe it will become more mainstream in the next 2-3 years.

If you’ve seen the Marketing Technology Landscape by Scott Brinker, you know that this is a crowded space. One that is inevitably confusing for many old-school marketers. So, I’ve positioned my company MediaThinkLabs as a Chief Marketing Technology Officer and consult with businesses on how they should arrange their marketing stack. What does the perfect marketing stack look like for your brand or your industry? This is what brand marketers should be considering today.

To start off any marketing stack, you should use some tag management solution – whatever you choose, you need to have a system in place to manage, deploy, and benefit from all of your marketing tags. It’s just too time consuming to place tags on 1000s of pages manually, and quite frankly there is no need to do that with enterprise level tools available.

Aside from the tag management subcategory of the marketing middleware category, you have infrastructure needs, marketing backbone platforms, marketing operations, marketing experiences, Internet, and cloud-based technologies to consider.

Being an enterprise marketer these days can be tough and confusing!

What skills do you think are going to be imperative for digital marketers to have in the future?
You have to become more data-driven. Gone are the days of fluff marketing. If you don’t know the numbers, and have metrics and analytics behind your efforts, then someone who does will soon be replacing you. This should frighten you into action. If not, enjoy retirement.

What is the best career advice you’ve received?
Never stop learning. In this industry, if I had stopped learning after college, I’d now be obsolete. In fact, I’d be as obsolete as that rotary home phone with the long cord that my mom would use to talk around the house. If you don’t continue learning in this marketing space… you are a rotary phone.

What’s one of the most common digital marketing challenges that you’re seeing from companies that you’re working with?
Optimizing optimization, or as I like to joke, “Awesomeization.” Getting a grasp on all of the data and metrics. How do you manage, own, collect, and act on all of your online, offline, and offsite data sources? What does it all mean? How can you learn more about your customers? How can you create context-aware content based on the visitors who come to your site? If you understand the marketing technology space, the answers are clear. If you do not… then you may need some help.

More about Travis Wright
Travis is a Venture Catalyst, Keynote Speaker, CMTO, Stand-Up Comic, Marketing Technology Entrepreneur, Data & Analytics Geek, Tech Journalist, and Growth Hacker. The former Global Social Media Strategist at Symantec, Wright has strategized marketing for hundreds of B2B & B2C business websites, from start-ups and mid-size businesses to Fortune 50 companies. With his consulting company, MediaThinkLabs, Wright travels throughout the country assisting company executives plan, optimize, integrate and execute successful digital media strategies. Wright’s tech podcast, Social Brands and Influencers, is hosted weekly on Technorati.

His blog is TravisWright.com. You can find him on Twitter @teedubya.

Summit Insiders: Four people you should get to know before Adobe Summit

SummitInsiders

This is part one of a five part series introducing the Summit Insiders. Stay tuned this week as we share our Q&A with each of these marketers.

We believe Adobe Summit plays a big role in establishing the narrative and standard for marketers everywhere. That’s why each year we gather the industry’s top innovators, luminaries and experts in every discipline to discuss how marketers can take advantage of every opportunity. It is an experience to be shared and talked about — not just for those attending the event in-person, but all those in the marketing community. So, as an effort to help fuel the conversation as well as provide a second screen experience for those on the ground, three years ago we something called Summit Insiders.

Summit Insiders is a collection of marketing experts whom we invite to join us on the ground at Summit to share their insights, observations and experience via social media, blogging and other digital outlets. These industry mavens — all representing different marketing disciplines — are invited because of their industry expertise, strong voice, and ability to provide a unique brand of insight.

This year’s Insiders are:

Travis Wright
Travis is a Venture Catalyst, Keynote Speaker, CMTO, Stand-Up Comic, Marketing Technology Entrepreneur, Data & Analytics Geek, Tech Journalist, and Growth Hacker. The former Global Social Media Strategist at Symantec, Wright has strategized marketing for hundreds of B2B & B2C business websites, from start-ups and mid-size businesses to Fortune 50 companies. With his consulting company, MediaThinkLabs, Wright travels throughout the country assisting company executives plan, optimize, integrate and execute successful digital media strategies. Wright’s tech podcast, Social Brands and Influencers, is hosted weekly on Technorati.

His blog is TravisWright.com. You can find him on Twitter @teedubya.

Toby Bloomberg
Toby Bloomberg is recognized for her expertise in combining social media with traditional marketing values (strategy, customer insights, segmentation) while maintaining digital conversation authenticity.  Her adventures in social media began in 2004 with the launch of her award winning blog Diva Marketing. She has worked with Fortune 100 brands and small business in both B2B, B2C, as well as, nonprofits.  Most recently Toby held the position of director of social media integration for Cox Digital Media where she supported a portfolio of over 70 TV, radio and newspapers properties in using social media as a catalyst to build stronger brand-to-audience relationships.

You can follow Toby on Twitter at @TobyDiva, or read her blog at bloombergmarketing.blogs.com/

Michele Kiss
Michele Kiss is a recognized digital analytics leader, with expertise ranging across web, mobile, marketing and social analytics. She is currently a Partner at Web Analytics Demystified, the leading global digital analytics consulting firm, responsible for their analysis and analyst mentoring practice. Michele is the winner of the Digital Analytics Association “Rising Star” award (2011) and “Practitioner of the Year” award (2013.) She is a frequent blogger, writer, podcast contributor and speaker.

You can read her thoughts at http://michele.webanalyticsdemystified.com, or on Twitter as@michelejkiss.

Elisabeth Osmeloski
Elisabeth Osmeloski is Director of Audience Development for Search Engine Land and Marketing Land, two of the leading trade publications in the digital marketing space. She is responsible for increasing readership through owned, earned and paid media channels. In addition, she assists in programming sessions at Third Door Media’s Search Marketing Expo conference series and manages speaking engagements for editorial staff.

Elisabeth is also co-founder and President of SLCSEM.org - Utah’s professional association for online marketers, dedicated to educating marketers on best practices for SEO, SEM, social media marketing and related disciplines, providing networking opportunities for digital marketers in Utah.

She holds a B.A. in Marketing from the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. She has nearly 15 years of agency and brand marketing/PR experience; her areas of expertise include adventure travel services, destination and tourism marketing, outdoor recreation and action sports, as well as luxury- and lifestyle-focused brands. She also spent several years as the Skiing Editor for About.com, and still enjoys writing as an active travel journalist whenever possible.

You can follow Elisabeth on Twitter @elisabethos, and read her latest articles on SearchEngineLand.com.

We sat down with each one of our Insiders to talk about marketing, reinvention (the theme of this year’s Summit) and more. Over the next couple of days, we’ll share hear what each Insider had to say, and invite you to get to know them a little bit better. In the meantime, all are worth following via social media and via their blogs.