Posts in Category "Packaging"

Using platformsdk for iOS on Windows

With AIR 3.3, it is possible to use platformsdk switch for iOS on a Windows machine too. For using this feature, one needs to copy the desired iOS SDK (iPhoneOS.x.y.sdk) on their Windows machine and use the platformsdk switch of the ADT:

adt -package 
   -target (ipa-test|ipa-test-interpreter|ipa-debug|
                ipa-debug-interpreter|ipa-ad-hoc|ipa-app-store) 
   SIGNING_OPTIONS 
   -provisioning-profile <path to .mobileprovision>
   <output IPA file> 
   <application.xml> <SWF> <assets> -extdir <path to extensions folder>
   -platformsdk <path to the iOS SDK folder>

Now, this seems fairly simple, the only difficulty which may arise is while copying the SDK from Mac to Windows machine(as symbolic links are present on Mac, which need to be copied as actual files on Windows, else packaging would fail).

Continue reading…

Using new Simulator Support feature for iOS

With Adobe AIR 3.3, support for native iOS simulator would be available for application development.

Prior to this feature, the only way to test AIR  applications on iOS was to have an actual device along with a developer certificate from Apple. With simulator support now available however, there is no need to obtain a developer certificate (which is a time consuming process) or to create a provisioning profile before starting to develop an AIR application. A p12 certificate, which can be created by the developer himself would be sufficient.

Native simulator for iOS is very helpful in testing and debugging AIR applications. Because support for this enhancement is currently not available in Flash tooling,  one could use the following adt commands below to use this feature .

Simulator for iOS is based on x86 architecture and therefore two new targets have been added in ADT to support the same. Continue reading…

Using release swf for publishing AIR applications

Adobe tools like Flash Builder allow you to compile actionscript sources of your application and then package all the swf content and assets as .air, .ipa, .apk and native package formats.

This post is meant to stress on the importance of using Release version of swf file for packaging when you intend to publish it on an application store.

Why should I care to create the release version of a swf?

There are two major advantages of using the release version for publishing applications:

  • Application Size – The debug version of a swf contains lot of extra information which is required for debugging during development. As a result, the size of debug version of a swf is always more than the corresponding release version. Continue reading…

Versioning in Flash Runtime (-swf-version)

AIR 3 Beta got released on Adobe Labs last week, providing a great opportunity to try out some of the exciting new enhancements that have been made by the team. Christian’s post provides the quick steps to get started with the AIR 3 Beta SDK.

In the “Additional compiler arguments” box, you need to add “-swf-version=13″ to make use of the new APIs introduced in AIR 3. So one question you might have is that if you are already specifying the namespace in your AIR application descriptor as 3.0, then what is the need of specifying more versioning information? Let me share with you some background about versioning in Flash Runtime.

SWF Versioning

Starting with AIR 2.6 release (and Flash Player 10.2), we changed our SWF versioning approach. Earlier we used to increase the SWF version only with major release of Flash Player. For eg. Continue reading…