Posts in Category "Uncategorized"

Versioning of multiple APKs for Android

Recently, with AIR 14, we announced x86 support for AIR applications. In this article, we explain how should developers manage the binary upload on Google Play Store for ARM and x86 binaries. Android devices are available with three kind of architectures – ARM, x86 and devices which support both x86 and ARM architectures (Eg: Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.1). AIR SDK (14.0.0.125 beta onwards) allows developers to create separate APK files for ARM and x86 architectures. And Google Play Developer console provides CPU architecture (ABI) as a filter criteria to support multiple APKs for the same application. The way Adobe AIR developers should make use of this filter criteria would depend on the packaging mode – captive or shared.

 

For Apps packaged with Captive mode

Please take a look at the following documentation. AIR developers should follow the same guidelines, as are mentioned for native applications.

http://developer.android.com/google/play/publishing/multiple-apks.html

Assigning a higher versionNumber  (in application descriptor) for the x86 version of apk would ensure that the Google Play serves x86 binary to devices with both x86 and ARM support,  thereby resulting in better performance.

 

For Apps packaged with Shared mode

After the recent release of x86 support in AIR, Play Store will have two different binaries for AIR Runtime app– one for ARM devices, and another for x86 devices. For devices which can run both, ARM binary version would be preferred because that used to get downloaded even before we introduced x86 support. And we plan to continue with the same preference to ensure that shared apps dependent on AIR runtime aren’t affected. To align with AIR Runtime app, applications packaged in shared mode should also keep their x86 based binary with lower versionNumber. With this approach, if you face any performance related issues on devices which support both the processors, then you can opt for captive mode of packaging.

The table below summarizes what version gets downloaded on device with different processors type.

  ARM Device x86 Device Device supporting both x86 and ARM
Runtime.apk ARM version x86 version ARM version
Captive App ARM version x86 version x86 version
Shared App ARM version x86 version ARM version

-Thanks

Multiple ANEs and conflicting resources

AIR 4.0 and later supports packaging of multiple JAR files in an ANE. That allows packaging of third party libraries and their corresponding resources an ANE.

The resources bundled in an ANE or any other library in the ANE can be accessed by R* method, and this document provides all the details.

This post talks about a scenario where multiple ANEs are used in an app and if two or more of the ANEs use same JAR file as a dependency (packagedDependency).  It is not possible to create such an app, and the packager fails with following error –

unexpected failure: duplicate entry: /R.class

This is expected because when the packager picks up resources of all the ANEs, and finds that two or more ANEs are using a same resource, the step to convert *.java to *.class file fails with a duplicate entry error. This is something which the packager cannot resolve by itself, and the developer has to step in.

If you face this packaging error, you need to remove the common JAR from all of the ANEs but one, to ensure that the packager finds a single copy of every JAR file as input.

Here is an example –

Suppose there are two ANEs used in an app i.e. example1.ane and example2.ane. Both of them use a common library, say commonlibrary.jar, and its resources, say, common-lib-res. If you try to package the app with these ANEs, ADT throws an error –

unexpected failure: duplicate entry: com.common.example.lib/R.class

To resolve the issue, you need to follow these steps (eg. is for a Mac) –

1. Copy example1.ane in a temp folder.

2. Unzip example.ane (run command ‘unzip example1.ane‘)

3. Remove the commonlibrary.jar from the package (i.e. from unzipped content of the ANE).

4. Remove the corresponding resources of commonlibrary.jar (i.e. “common-lib-res“) from the package.

5. In platform.xml, delete the entry for commonlibrary.jar from the tag and delete the entry of the common-lib-res from the tag.

6. Zip back contents of package to ANE –

  • zip –r –D example1.zip META-INF catalog.xml library.swf mimetype
  • rm –rf example1.ane META-INF catalog.xml library.swf mimetype
  • mv example1.zip example1.ane

Use this new temp/example1.ane and existing example2.ane to package the APK file. You should not see any packaging or runtime error now.

Hope that helps! :)

Preventing Automatic Cloud Backup on iOS devices

According to the Apple guidelines, data that can be downloaded again or regenerated shall be stored in the <APPLICATION_HOME>/Library/Caches directory. So, with AIR 3.6, a new static property, File.cacheDirectory has been introduced, which points to this directory. Files stored in this directory are not backed up on the iCloud. Examples of files you should put in the Caches directory include database cache files and downloadable content, such as that used by magazine, newspaper, and map applications. On Mac OSX and Android, File.cacheDirectory points to the Caches directory ( <APPLICATION_HOME>/Library/Caches on Mac and <APPLICATION_HOME>/caches directory on Android). While on Windows, it points to the parent directory being used by File.createTempDirectory.

var myCacheFile: File = File.cacheDirectory.resolvePath("cacheFile.txt");

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Changed behavior of Shared Object on iOS in AIR 3.5

With AIR 3.5 the path of shared objects changed than it used to be in AIR 3.4, following illustrates the difference between paths:
In AIR 3.4:
AppName/Library/Application Support/com.namecompany.name/Local Store/ #SharedObjects/Filename.swf
where Filename.swf comes from the <Filename> tag of app-xml.

In AIR 3.5:
AppName/Library/Application Support/com.namecompany.name/Local Store/ #SharedObjects/Content.swf
where Content.swf comes from the <Content> tag of app-xml which contains
the name of root SWF of app.

This issue is fixed in 3.6(labs), so when user will update his/her app from AIR 3.4 to 3.6, then application will not lose any data which is stored with shared object. While any new App which will be published with next release of AIR will have shared object path:
AppName/Library/Application Support/com.namecompany.name/Local Store/ #SharedObjects/Content.swf

Workaround for AIR 3.5:

For those app-developers who are going to publish their app with AIR 3.5 there is a workaround for them.Since now shared object path is taken from tag <Content> rather than tag <Filename> so you can rename your root SWF to Filename.swf and also provide the same to tag. For example:
In AIR 3.4 :
<Filename>MysharedObject</Filename>
<Content>Root.swf</Content>

Now in AIR 3.5, rename it like following:
<Filename>MysharedObject</Filename>
<Content>MysharedObject.swf</Content>

and also rename Root.swf to MysharedObject.swf.
By this way the data of the app will be saved when it will be updated from AIR 3.4 to AIR 3.5.

We would like to hear your feedback, please let us know if you face any issues.

Excluding Devices From Requested Display Resolution Mode

RequestedDisplayResolution tag in application descriptor allows the developer to choose between standard or high resolution on iOS devices with high resolution screen. High resolution screens were earlier only available in iPhone and iPod 4th Generation and above. Recently released models on iPad namely iPad 3rd & 4th Generation also boast of a high resolution screen with 2048×1536 resolution. Specifying a ‘high’ value in requestedDisplayResolution tag enables the retina mode in the all iOS devices having the high resolution screen. Prior to AIR 3.6, there was no way to enable or disable retina mode on some specific devices. There existed some workarounds but they came with some trade offs of not able to use the iOS 6 specific features.

A new attribute ‘excludeDevices’ has been added in AIR 3.6  in the requestedDisplayResolution tag in the application descriptor. Developers will now be able to explicitly disable the specified display resolution on one or more iOS devices using this attribute.

<requestedDisplayResolution excludeDevices="iPhone4,1">high</requestedDisplayResolution>

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