Posts tagged "Packaging"

External hosting of secondary SWFs for AIR apps on iOS

Starting with AIR 3.7, application developers will be able to host their secondary SWFs on an external server and load them on demand as per their application logic.

Till AIR 3.5, loading of only assets such as images, videos and SWFs without actionscript code, commonly referred as Actionscript Byte Code(ABC Code), from external server was supported. The workflow for the application developer for loading such assets from server resembles the diagram below :

 AIR 3.5 Workflow

With AIR 3.6, the feature for loading of locally packaged secondary SWFs containing ABC code was introduced. The detailed description about this feature and its usage can be found at this blog – “Packaging and loading of multiple SWFs for AIR apps on iOS“. The workflow for the application developer using this feature is described in the diagram below:

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Launch Images for AIR Applications on iOS

Apple expects all its iOS applications to have launch images for all supported devices and resolutions to enhance the user experience at application launch.  In general, an iPhone application should have a Portrait launch image and an iPad application should have a launch image as per the launch orientation of the application. As mentioned here, every application must include launch image for different sizes and resolution. Looking at the sizes closely, we notice that Apple expects fullscreen launch images for iPhone whereas it expects non fullscreen launch images for iPad. This size recommendation by Apple is irrespective of the fact whether the application is meant to be fullscreen or not. Continue reading…

AIR iOS app packaging with Flash Tooling and AIR 3.3

If you are using iOS Native Extensions with AIR 3.3, you may find that your application does not get packaged when using Flash Builder/Flash Pro. This is because, when using native extensions, linker warnings are not suppressed, and Flash Builder/Flash Pro are not able to handle such large number of warnings, specifically on Windows. This issue will be fixed in the upcoming release of Flash Builder and Flash Pro.

In order to overcome this issue, you can include the platform descriptor file (platform.xml) in your ANE, which contains the following linker option:

<option>-w</option>

A sample platform descriptor file will look like this:

<platform xmlns="http://ns.adobe.com/air/extension/3.1">
 <sdkVersion>5.0</sdkVersion> 
 <linkerOptions> 
 <option>-w</option> 
 </linkerOptions> 
</platform>

Then, at the time of packaging the ANE, include the ADT switch -platformoptions, providing the path to the platform descriptor file. For example,

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Using new Simulator Support feature for iOS

With Adobe AIR 3.3, support for native iOS simulator would be available for application development.

Prior to this feature, the only way to test AIR  applications on iOS was to have an actual device along with a developer certificate from Apple. With simulator support now available however, there is no need to obtain a developer certificate (which is a time consuming process) or to create a provisioning profile before starting to develop an AIR application. A p12 certificate, which can be created by the developer himself would be sufficient.

Native simulator for iOS is very helpful in testing and debugging AIR applications. Because support for this enhancement is currently not available in Flash tooling,  one could use the following adt commands below to use this feature .

Simulator for iOS is based on x86 architecture and therefore two new targets have been added in ADT to support the same. Continue reading…

Using release swf for publishing AIR applications

Adobe tools like Flash Builder allow you to compile actionscript sources of your application and then package all the swf content and assets as .air, .ipa, .apk and native package formats.

This post is meant to stress on the importance of using Release version of swf file for packaging when you intend to publish it on an application store.

Why should I care to create the release version of a swf?

There are two major advantages of using the release version for publishing applications:

  • Application Size – The debug version of a swf contains lot of extra information which is required for debugging during development. As a result, the size of debug version of a swf is always more than the corresponding release version. Continue reading…