Posts tagged "Audition"

The latest update for Audition CC 2015 now available!

It’s my pleasure to announce that the latest release of Adobe Audition CC 2015 is now available for download!  I shared a sneak peek online in September, and in person at IBC, and today I’m happy to make it available to all Creative Cloud members.  Whether you’ll be using Remix to craft custom re-arrangements from your music library, downloading or developing integrated Creative Cloud Extension panels, synthesizing scratch voiceovers using Generate Speech, or using our updated Loudness tools to ensure broadcast regulation compatibility, this update is built to delight you.  Workspace bar and increased UI performance with large multitrack sessions round out the new improvements by helping you work faster than ever before.

Audition CC 2015.1

Watch for deep dives into each of these features over the next few weeks, where we’ll show you all the tips and tricks to getting the best results.  You can see Jason Levine presenting Audio Tools for Post at IBC, and be sure to let us know on Twitter and Facebook how you’re using #AdobeAudition in your projects.

You can install the latest update for Adobe Audition through Creative Cloud for desktop or from within Audition by selecting Help > Updates in the menu.

Find out what’s new in the rest of the Adobe video and audio tools lineup:

If you have a Creative Cloud membership, you always have access to the most up-to-date version of Audition. Go to the Creative Cloud site to download it and other Adobe applications. To try out the 2015 update for Adobe Audition CC, you can sign up for a free Creative Cloud trial membership.  For information about Creative Cloud memberships, visit this page.

Audition Deep Dive: REMIX – Automatically rearrange any song to fit any duration

Music is a crucial element for most video productions, supporting the visuals and providing the perfect mood. But our favorite musicians rarely consider the length of our video projects when composing and producing their songs. This means we often need to pay a remix engineer to create a new version of a song, try to tackle it ourselves by finding loopable clips and aligning beats, or giving up and just creating an abrupt fade out at the end of our project. None of these solutions help with budgets, deadlines, or artistic integrity, which is where a new feature in Adobe Audition steps in to save the day.

Audition’s new REMIX tool analyzes your song files, identifying hundreds of loops, transitions, and important segments, and then allows you to quickly remix to any duration. While it’s default settings are often nothing short of miraculous, several parameters allow editors to dial in an ideal new arrangement.

The song file is much longer than the video, but I don't want to just fade out in the middle of a verse.

This song file is much longer than the video, but I don’t want to just fade out in the middle of a verse. Remix will analyze the song and find dozens of potential transitions, then put the pieces together to create a new shorter or longer song to match my desired duration as closely as possible.

To use Remix in your own projects, drop a song clip into an empty track in your multitrack session. Open the Properties panel and click Enable Remix <replace with image of button> in the Remix group. Audition will analyze the recording using a combination of beat detection and source-separation for harmonic identification. This process usually takes around 4 seconds per minute of source music, so it should be very fast. Once analyzed, you can type a specific Target Duration in the panel, or simply drag the zig-zag Remix Clip Handles to adjust the length of your clip and snap to length of your video file.

Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 3.23.11 PM

Drag the Remix clip handles, or type an exact duration to create a remix.

Drag the Remix clip handles, or type an exact duration to create a remix.

Almost instantaneously, your clip will be remixed with each transition between two segments of the original song indicated by vertical zig-zags, which resemble splices on old tape or film recordings.  Move the playhead a few seconds before one of these transitions and hit play, listening closely as Audition crossfades over the beat.

In green is the Remix clip, while the pink track represents the individual clips and crossfades used to compose the remix.

In green is the Remix clip, while the pink track exposes the individual clips and crossfades used to compose the remix.  Note that the crossfades are represented by white zig-zags in the Remix clip. You will likely work completely with the single Remix clip, but if you right-click and choose Remix > Split Remixed Clip into Segments, you can access each segment or adjust crossfades as you like.

For a lot of music, the default results will sound great and be unnoticeable by listeners. But for well-known or dynamic songs, you may want to try a different arrangement. Open the Remix Properties Advanced section and you’ll see a small selection of options that will adjust your remix.

 

Depending on the tempo and specific nature of the song you used, the duration may not be exactly precise. You could enable the Stretch to exact duration parameter, applying a real-time stretch to the clip for sample-perfect timing.

Edit Length

Edit Length tells the algorithm to favor shorter segments with more transitions, or longer segments with fewer transitions. If your original song changes fairly dramatically from start to finish, shorter segments and more transitions will allow your remix to flow more naturally. Songs with a consistent structure and style may benefit from fewer transitions, keeping any changes to a minimum.

Features:

Features instructs the algorithm to favor Timbre (rhythmic elements) or Harmonic structure when making transitions and crossfades. For electronic or pop music, Timbre will make sure the beat stays locked in place. For choral or softer tracks, Harmonic emphasis will help create smooth blends.

Minimum Loop:

Minimum Loop tells Audition the shortest segment you will permit, in number of beats, and can be useful if the algorithm makes short transitions which might be mathematically ideal, but which sound unnatural to our subjective ears.

Maximum Slack:

Finally, Maximum Slack constrains the remix duration to as close to your target duration as possible. If an exact duration is not necessary, adjusting this parameter can make for better-sounding remixes.

 

We hope Audition’s Remix tool helps you work faster and generate better results for less effort. It might not put remix professionals out of work just yet, but several DJ’s have already told me they’ll be using it as part of their own workflows. I feel confident you’ll make it part of yours as well.

A look at Batch Processing filename templates

One of Adobe Audition’s strengths is its ability to perform operations on many files at once, whether transcoding uncompressed WAV files to MP3, ensuring a dozen audio files are of legal broadcast loudness levels, or applying a full recorded favorite consisting of a dozen or more actions.  Audition does this quickly, taking advantage of your multicore or multiple CPU workstations to process multiple files simultaneously, and offers template-based naming and storage so you can organize your files based on their metadata.  We’ve received several comments recently from users who are asking for a crash course on filename templates as the documentation does not delve that deep, so I’m happy to shed a bit more light on that today.

Continue reading…

Audition CC as a Loudness Correction Appliance

Update: As of Audition CC 2015.1 (Released Nov 30, 2015) the “Match Volume” panel has been renamed “Match Loudness” and the Loudness standards have been updated to include additional regions.  In addition, the same functionality has been added to Adobe Media Encoder.  By using AME’s “Watch Folders” and setting up an automated action to correct loudness of files copied to a watch folder, AME can completely automate the loudness correction process, creating a true “Loudness Correction Appliance.”

While chatting with many of our users at NAB, IBC, and AES, it’s clear that loudness measurement and conformity is a crucial element in preparing their content for broadcast.  The CALM Act in the USA, and similar acts in countries around the world, enforce strict requirements on loudness measurement of content, with many standards such as ITU BS.1770, EBU R128,  ARIB TR-B32, or ATSC A/85.  Unlike the old days, where editors just had to make sure their levels didn’t go into the read, the new standards can require significantly more attention while mixing, or may benefit from post-processing tools which can automate the workflow.

Adobe Audition CC offers several loudness measurement and correction tools, which editors can easily utilize as they work or export their final content.  But this can often be a nuisance, especially in fast-paced newsrooms, and can be prone to the accidental neglectful save without ensuring the content meets station or regulatory standards.  But it’s easy to insert a step in the path from editor to playback where content can be batch processed, and we’re hearing from users who are using a seat of Audition as a Loudness Correction Appliance!  When this was brought to my attention, I wanted to make sure we shared it ASAP as it can literally save time and minimize the possibility of non-standard content making it to the airwaves.

An Audition Loudness Correction Appliance (ALCA) is simply a PC or Mac workstation running Audition, with access to a shared network drive.  As editors copy their finished audio files to this shared directory, Audition can be used to perform a Match Loudness pass on files as a batched process, conforming to ITU BS.1770 or any specific loudness measurements desired.  Files can be dragged or imported into the ALCA Match Volume Panel by a lead editor, eager intern, or well-trained bird, and with a single click, individually analyzed and corrected for loudness.  In addition, all content can also be automatically converted to ensure the specific sample rate, bit rate, metadata, and quality settings required for your automation playback systems.  The corrected, conformed files are then exported and saved to a new location, which could be a Watch Folder automating import to the playback system.

To configure your own ALCA, install and activate Adobe Audition CC to the desired appliance workstation.  For this workflow, we only need a single panel visible, greatly simplifying the interface.  Open the Match Loudness panel from the Window menu.

Open the Match Volume panel from the application Window menu

Open the Match Loudness panel from the application Window menu

You can close the other panels if you like or, and here’s a little tip that works in many Adobe applications, press the tilde ~ key while you’re mouse cursor is over this panel to immediately maximize it.  You can also save this layout as a new Workspace by selecting Window > New Workspace…

This panel is the only one you need open for your Audition Loudness Correction Appliance system.

This panel is the only one you need open for your Audition Loudness Correction Appliance system.

Create a new workspace so you can quickly restore the layout if someone changes it.

Create a new workspace so you can quickly restore the layout if someone changes it.

Within the Match Loudness panel, click the Match Loudness Settings button (near the top) to show the loudness correction settings.  The default algorithm is ITU-R BS.1770-2 which is compatible with EBU R128.  The default loudness is –23 LUFS, but you could set this to whatever level your station or regional legislation requires.  This will automatically be saved in the application’s preferences such that it becomes the new default.

The Match Volume Settings allow you to specify the type of loudness correction you desire, and customize the specific LUFS value for your needs.

The Match Loudness Settings allow you to specify the type of loudness correction you desire, and customize the specific LUFS value for your needs.

Next, you’ll want to add your files to be corrected to the panel.  You can click the Add Files button at the top-left of the panel, double-click in the center of the panel to invoke the Open Files dialog, or drag-and-drop them from Windows Explorer or OS X Finder.  If you click the Compute button (the magnifying glass icon to the left of the Match Volume Settings button) Audition will automatically analyze every file deposited in this panel and calculate its original loudness value and amplitude statistics.  While this isn’t necessary, it can give you a feel for how things are working and provide some insight into the overall process.

These files have been added to the dialog list, and are ready to be processed. While the example files are MP3, your files can be of any format, sample rate, or channelization settings.

These files have been added to the dialog list, and are ready to be processed. While the example files are MP3, your files can be of any format, sample rate, or channelization settings.

To help automate the workflow, you can setup Audition to automatically process and save the files.  To do so, toggle the Export checkbox at the lower-left corner and click the Export Settings… button when it becomes enabled.  You can configure filename prefix or postfix values here (such as “loudness corrected”) or even choose templates that will draw from the file metadata.  Set the Location value to the directory where you want your finished files to be placed.

In the Export Settings dialog, you can configure the naming conventions, export location, and file format settings you wish for all media.

In the Export Settings dialog, you can configure the naming conventions, export location, and file format settings you wish for all media.

To modify the final file format settings, select the desired format (such as WAV PCM) from the Format dropdown.  To further customize your output, click the Change buttons next to Sample Type (to set sample rate, bit rate, and channelization) or Format Settings (to configure codec specific parameters.)

Sample Type configuration allows you to force all files to specific settings required by your playback system. For instance you could force all exports to be 16-bit, for legacy automation systems that do not support 32- or 24-bit data types.

Sample Type configuration allows you to force all files to specific settings required by your playback system. For instance you could force all exports to be 16-bit, for legacy automation systems that do not support 32- or 24-bit data types.

For convenience, you can configure Audition to Remove files from the panel upon completion and Close files upon completion to free up resources as each file is processed.  Include markers and other metadata will ensure that the metadata from the source file carries through to the destination file.  If you have ID3 metadata from a source MP3 file, it will even carry through to the new destination file.  BWF bext chunks, (AES-46) CART chunks, iXML chunks, or other specific metadata chunks within a source Wave file will persist through to the destination file as well.  Click OK if you are satisfied.  You should not need to configure these settings again!

With files loaded into the panel, you can now click Run and watch your new ALCA go!  Audition will process multiple files at a time, taking advantage of multiple CPU cores to run analysis and processing in parallel.  To customize how many processor cores Audition can take advantage of, open Preferences > Data and adjust the Maximum number of concurrent file processes value.

ALCA loudness correction in progress! In this case, all files will be corrected to -17 LUFS, saved in a new destination, and removed from the panel.

ALCA loudness correction in progress! In this case, all files will be corrected to -17 LUFS, saved in a new destination, and removed from the panel.

This process should greatly speed up loudness conformance while minimizing risk of broadcasting incorrect content, with the addition of ensuring all media meets specific format requirements.  If you setup an ALCA in your edit room, please share your experience and photos!  If you have specific requests for additional functionality, please don’t hesitate to let us know.  I can envision a future where this process is completely automated, utilizing Watch Folders or a similar technology.

 

Learn Audition CC by trying your hand at basic noise reduction

We now have a great intro course for Audition CC that shows you how to fix your audio, easily and efficiently. Free for all CC members, the course includes with downloadable assets. You can can complete the exercises in 30 minutes.

The new course arrives at a good time. We’ve been really pleased at the number of downloads of Audition CC since its release last June. Many of those downloaders are  CC members who are already experienced in audio editing – but there are growing numbers of users, especially video editors, who are still new to the art of manipulating sound. We’re happy to be able to help those folks get started with these new exercises – under the expert guidance of Adobe evangelist Jason Levine. Little known fact: Jason originally came to Adobe as part of the Cool Edit Pro team. That was the product that became Adobe Audition.

Audition CC includes the new Sound Remover and Preview Editor.jpg

Adobe Audition CC includes powerful tools that let you remove sounds easily and efficiently, including really cool Photoshop-style paintbrush, lasso, and healing tools. Unless you shoot your video and record audio in a professional studio, there is a good chance your clips have unwanted background noise in them.

Sometimes the best way to learn to use software is just to dive right in. The new Learn Audition CC – Get started allows you to do just that!

Download Adobe Audition CC.

Guide to using 32-bit VST effects with Audition CC via jBridge

It’s a crisp December morning, and I’m looking out my office window at the little corporate building bunny rabbit that lives in the bushes.  He pretty much keeps to himself nibbling on grass, playing with the robins, and hiding from the corporate stray cat that roams through once in awhile.  But every once in awhile, I can hear him talking to me through his big, soulful eyes.  Usually I can dismiss it as the ramblings of a silly rabbit – I mean, c’mon – but this morning he said something that really struck a chord with me.  He mentioned, in a very matter-of-fact manner, that he’s flummoxed with getting his 32-bit VSTs working in Audition CC.  After crafting an e-mail, the standard method of communicating back to psychic bunnies, I figured I’d better share it with our blog readers, even though I’m pretty sure y’all are smarter than this rabbit.

boring picture of bunny

Yes, he looks mild-mannered and cuddly, but he’s a master manipulator, and prone to engineering elaborate pranks. Do not take his advice at face value.  He does have a good ear for mixing a session, though.

 

Quick review of 32 vs. 64-bit plug-ins, and VSTs in general

Until Audition CC was released, Audition was strictly a 32-bit application.  Basically, this means there was a finite amount of RAM Audition was able to utilize – around 4 gigabytes.  As projects have grown bigger, plug-ins and media have become larger, and more high-resolution video files are used in sessions, many users have started to hit this limitation.  After Audition CS6 shipped, we made the decision to update the tool as a native 64-bit application and be on par with most of the other Adobe Creative Cloud tools.  Not only would this allow access to more memory, but it improves performance in many areas and enables features in the latest hardware and operating systems to be fully utilized.

There was a problem, though.  32-bit VST plug-ins are not natively compatible with a 64-bit host application.  While Waves and other large plug-in authors began releasing 64-bit editions of their tools, it turns out there are a lot of folks still using old, often abandoned, 32-bit plug-ins that are unlikely to see an update.  In order to “bridge the gap” between 32-bit plug-ins and a 64-bit host, you’ll need to install a “bit-bridge.”  (Do you see what I did there?  Bit-Bridge.  Bridge the gap.  I got a million of ’em!)  A bit-bridge acts as a go-between and does all the intermediary math that’s required to fool both the plug-in and the host application to believe that they’re talking to each other.

We got in touch with the folks at jBridge who had been developing and distributing a bit-bridge tool for a few years.  We found jBridge to work very well for most effects we tested, and implemented direct Windows support, though Mac was still in beta when Audition CC wrapped development .  (As a brief aside, the programming quality of your average free VST from the net can vary WILDLY.  Most of the crash reports in Audition over the years have been the result of a plug-in stepping outside its bounds, and much work has gone in to minimizing and preventing these problematic plug-ins from doing too much damage.)  If you’re struggling without your favorite effects, please consider installing and purchasing this tool if you find it works well.

 

Using jBridge with Audition CC on Windows

As noted, Audition CC for Windows implements direct support for jBridge.  Download jBridge and run the installer .EXE file.  Due to OS security measures, you’ll probably need to instruct Windows to run the jBridge processes as an Administrator.  You can find full step-by-step instructions by visiting How to use jBridge – A detailed walkthrough, but basically you’ll need to right-click the three .EXE application files in C:\Program Files\JBridge\ and check “Run this program as an Administrator” in the Properties panel.  This change gives jBridge permission to share plug-ins with Audition and other DAWs.

Launch Audition and select Edit > Preferences > Effects in the menu bar.  Check the preference “Scan 32-bit VST effects using jBridge.” and click OK.

Check this preference to allow jBridge to blend your 32-bit VST plug-ins with your other plug-ins.

Check this preference to allow jBridge to blend your 32-bit VST plug-ins with your other plug-ins.

With this enabled, you’re ready to scan for effects!  Click Effects > Audio Plug-in Manager… from the menu bar and make sure the sure the directory path for the VST effects you wish to use is added.  The default location for 32-bit effects is typically C:\Program Files (x86)\VstPlugins\  Click Scan for Plug-ins and you should see Audition scanning your 32-bit VST effects as if nothing out of the ordinary were going on.  You may see the following warning pop-up, but we know better now, don’t we?

It has no idea what we're about to do!

It has no idea what we’re about to do!

 

Once the scan is complete, you should see a list of all the recognized, valid VST plug-ins found.  Click OK and you should find your effects under Effects > VST in the menu bar.  Hooray!

Screen Shot 2013-12-19 at 11.23.04 AM

 

 

 

Using jBridgeM with Audition CC on Mac OS X

As I mentioned before, jBridgeM (jBridge for Mac, in case you’re slow of mind) is the equivalent tool for OS X users, but at the time we implemented support in Audition, the tool was still in beta testing.  While there are much fewer 32-bit VST effects for Mac, we did want to make sure your bases were covered as well.  jBridgeM has the ability to generate new, wrapped VSTs which appear to Audition as a new, 64-bit VST.

First, download jBridgeM and run the installer .PKG file.  Your system may require a restart after the installation is complete.  Go ahead and come on back here when that’s complete.  I’ll wait…  Ready?  Great!  You should now see a new folder in your Applications labeled jBridgeM and inside there is jBridgerM.app  Launching this should present you with  the following dialog:

These options are shown on launch!  No additional clicking necessary.

These options are shown on launch! No additional clicking necessary.

You can generally just use the default options, and click I’ll be using a 64bit VST host.  It will start scanning your installed VST effects and it’s generally best to just sit back and let it do its thing since it tends to pop back into focus with each effect which can be maddening if you’re trying to write a blog post at the same time it scans in the background.  Once it’s complete, it gives you a bit of details as to how many 32-bit effects it found and successfully wrapped.  (It creates a new file on disk, and the host DAWs will see these new files as valid 64-bit effects.)  Next, launch Audition and click Effects > Audio Plug-in Manager… in the menu bar then select Scan for Plug-Ins.  After a few moments, you should see your newly-wrapped plug-ins appear below!  Click OK and access them by selecting Effects > VST in the menu bar or through the Effects Rack panels!

Well done!  If you have additional questions or problems, feel free to visit us in the Adobe User to User forums.  Have a great holiday and new year, and I can’t wait for 2014.  Now, if only that bunny would stop getting songs stuck in my head.  He has such poor taste.

Demystifying Audio – Adobe Audition for Video Editors – eSeminar on July 25, 2013

“The best way to improve the quality of your picture is to improve the quality of your sound”

On Thursday, July 25h, 2013 |10:00 AM Pacific Time, we will be offering a special Ask a Video Pro session with Larry Jordan:

 Demystifying Audio – Adobe Audition for Video Editors 

You can register free for this eSeminar here.

The first question many video editors ask is: “why should I consider using an audio application for my projects?”  Larry  will show you how you can use Adobe Audition to create better videos. Starting with an overview of the application, Larry will then demonstrate how Audition can make your life a lot easier. During this 45-minute presentation, you’ll discover:

  • Send files and projects between Premiere Pro and Audition
  • Remove hum from an interview
  • Remove background noise
  • Maximize audio levels without causing distortion
  • Do an audio mix of your project
  • Create “stems,” or submixes, of your dialog, effects, and music tracks
  • Test your final mix to be sure it meets all technical specs before submitting it to the client.

The session will be followed by a Q&A.

Audience: video editors, postproduction professionals, audio pros
Applications: Adobe Audition CC and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Workflows with other NLEs will also be discussed.

Sign up now for Demystifying Audio – Adobe Audition for Video Editors
Thursday, July 25h, 2013 |10:00 AM Pacific Time

 

New Audition CC Training Series by Larry Jordan

If you do anything in postproduction, odds are you’ve heard of Larry Jordan. Along with authoring eight books, over a thousand technical articles, and a plethora of popular video training programs, he also hosts an Internet radio show called Digital Production BuZZ that draws tens of thousands of listeners each month.

A huge proponent of Adobe Audition, Larry hosts a weekly webinar on postproduction software and techniques. To celebrate his 100th webinar, Larry focused on the latest version of Audition: Fix Bad Audio in Adobe Audition CC.

On top of that, Larry has just released a brand-new training series on Adobe Audition CC, aimed at video editors who want to improve the quality of their sound. We thought this would be a great occasion to talk with Larry and learn more.

Note: Larry Jordan is offering our readers 10% off. See the bottom of this post for your discount code.

Continue reading…

Making Films with the Adobe Creative Cloud production tools

One week ago, on June 13, director Richard Jobson delivered a dynamic presentation on Wayland’s Song, his sixth feature film made entirely using Adobe Creative Cloud (CS6) applications. In this special Ask a Video Pro session, Richard will describe the whole process from planning through to final delivery, including scriptwriting and production scheduling with Adobe Story, ingest and logging with Prelude, video editing in Adobe Premiere Pro, visual effects with After Effects, and final color grading with SpeedGrade. Naturally, audio editing and mixing were done in AuditionWayland’s Song premiered this year at the Cannes Film Festival.

(updated June 20) Continue reading…

Coming in June: Audition CC in Adobe Creative Cloud

Today we announced the launch of the next generation of our creative tools coming this June (you can watch a recording of the live stream here). Adobe Audition CC, along with all of the other new desktop applications will be available exclusively in Adobe Creative Cloud. We’re extremely excited about this release, not to mention Creative Cloud and the services and integration it offers.

Adobe Audition CC
Audition CC brings some really cool new features, including the revolutionary new Sound Remover and the super-useful Preview Editor. This release is packed with goodies, including enhanced multitrack, new sound design tools, Audio Finesse workflow refinements, ITU Loudness metering, and lots more. For a detailed overview of the new features, check out Durin’s awesome Adobe Audition CC preview post from last month, or the Reveal videos we did for NAB.

Adobe Creative Cloud
And the coolest feature in the Audition CC release is Adobe Creative Cloud. Continue reading…