Archive for June, 2013

New Feature: Responsive Projects

Behance projects just became responsive!

We’re so excited about the newly responsive project displays for a few different reasons, but most of all because it means viewing Behance projects will be easy, intuitive, and look great on a wide variety of devices—tablets, smartphones, and desktops alike.

That’s because a responsive site molds to fit to the context within which it’s being viewed—scaling itself to adapt to each display. In other words, viewing the responsive Behance home page on an iPhone screen does not require resizing, zooming out, or scrolling in order to have an experience that rivals viewing the site on a desktop computer. The page molds itself to fit onto a smaller screen proportionally by registering information from the site.

The move towards responsive design has also been a big learning experience for the Behance team—our very own Jackie Balzer recently wrote a piece for Net Magazine about the nitty gritty behind the dev and design decisions while making the search and discovery tools on the homepage responsive.



In other words, viewing the responsive Behance home page on an iPhone screen does not require resizing, zooming out, or scrolling in order to have an experience that rivals viewing the site on a desktop computer.
 


As she explains, transitioning to a responsive design required the Dev and Design teams to reconsider everything from the organization of their code, to the way basic navigation tools would be displayed. The big changes included hiding the navigation toolbar (in a “basement”—accessibly only when pulled up) and removing the ability for users to zoom in (hopefully, there’s no need to), but the project also required countless smaller detail tweaks. The next step after the code and design building blocks were in place? Testing, testing, and more testing… on a variety of different (real!) devices and operating systems.

Jackie’s article has lots more information about just how much we were able to learn during this process. If you’re curious about coding specifics or the other design decisions, you can find it here.

 

Behance & Creative Cloud


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A Closer Look with Bex Glover

We had the pleasure of interviewing Bex Glover, a graphic designer, artist & illustrator living and working in Bristol, UK. 

How long have you been in design/illustration?
10 years

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
Yes to some degree, my personal work is often more hand rendered / painting based -using markers and spray paint, and it tends to have a more abstract aesthetic. I like to emulate the hand rendered feel in my digital illustrative work too, but the style and subject matter will be dictated by the requirements of the brief. Some can be cleaner cut, simple, and digital in style, others more urban and freestyle. It’s great when you get projects where the client wants to do something based on your personal work –that’s often the more fun, creative stuff.

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Most Appreciated Projects: Monthly Roundup

Appreciations are a way to send genuine kudos to another creative professional on Behance. This is our community’s way of curating the network, so that the best projects gain the most exposure. Here’s a look at two of the most appreciated projects on Behance this month:


The folks at Creative Lab created and shared the visual guidelines they designed for Google. Check out part 1 and part 2 to see all the product icons, logo lockups and illustrations they compiled.

Illustrator Tobia Hall was commissioned by the Holiday Inn to design and paint a custom mural.  He documents his process and the finished piece in this project.

Portfolio Review Week Spring 2013 Recap

Last month’s Portfolio Review Week was an absolute success. With over 200 events in 70 countries, thousands of creatives worldwide had the opportunity to showcase their work. Thank you to both our hosts & attendees for another amazing round!

Portfolio Review Week Spring 2013 Recap from Behance on Vimeo.

Behind the Project: A Transit App For Seasoned Commuters

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Martin Oberhäuser is a Hamburg, Germany based information and interface designer. After working with various large agencies and freelancing, Oberhäuser founded the oberhaeuser.info design studio in 2011.  Oberhäuser’s passion for data visualization is apparent in projects that range from encyclopedia infographics to an app that monitors and tracks online mentions.  We spoke with him about his recent project, nextr, an iPhone app that helps users navigate German public transit by providing intuitive, essential information and directions.

What was your inspiration for this project?
My inspiration was initially personally motivated. I use public transportation services in Germany pretty frequently and I was never satisfied with the available transportation guidance apps. I felt like there was a lot of room for improvement, especially for heavy transit users like myself. Most people I know that use these apps are familiar with the public transportation systems in their cities. They only need quick access to some important use cases, for example “when does the next train depart from the station closest to my home?” So I focused on this user group and provided this easy access combined with the ability to drill deeper for more information if necessary.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I decided to play around with some initial ideas and concepts for a more intuitive app. After a while I came up with a structure based around the current user position on a map and easy access to nearby stations.

I approached my iOS developer Marcus Wermuth with this concept and some initial layouts and asked if he’d be interested in and capable of developing the app. Fortunately, he was excited to work with me on making this concept a reality. Of course, we had other running client projects and had to earn some money, so it took us a while to reach a working prototype, and then a fully functional app.
This project continues to be pretty challenging because we are working with real time data and geolocation. The real challenge, however, was to initially achieve the right amount of simplification—asking “what information is really relevant for the user and what is our main target audience?”

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project?  (fans contacting you, job opportunities, blogs picking it up, etc).

We used Behance as the main tool to advertise the launch of our app and the reactions have been phenomenal. A few hours after we published the project many blogs were writing about it and it soon became the second best selling app on the German App Store. We are also getting many interview requests from blogs and tech magazines. I can’t say exactly how big the impact of Behance was, but it definitely played a big role.

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Behance Testimonials – Hemali Vadalia

“When I began my career as an animator & illustrator, I had no idea how to reach out to clients and find projects that give me creative freedom. I mostly worked for the clients in Mumbai. Then I happened to know about Behance and I’m glad that I uploaded my portfolio here. My clay illustrations & animation got noticed. Also my work with paper craft was appreciated. And within a month I got a couple of wonderful projects to work on.”

 

“This, followed by a lot of encouraging emails and appreciations. It just made things easier for me to showcase my work and the process behind it. I also got to do workshops. Now I have been working on animations and illustrations for iPad games, websites, books and magazines. Apart from this, there’s a lot to learn from the creative community and get inspired everyday!”

–Hemail Vadalia, Mumbai, India (http://www.behance.net/hemali)

 

Want to be featured here or on our Testimonials page?  Visit our testimonials page and share your story!

Behind the Project: Branding a Family-Owned Ski Resort for a Modern Era

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. This time, we spoke with Bureau Rabensteiner, an Innsbruck, Austria based graphic design studio. Their designs range from thermo sensitive business cards to branding bakeries. We spoke to them about their recent hotel branding project for the Trofana Alpin.

What was your inspiration for this project?
The Trofana Alpin was the very first hotel in the winter sports resort of Ischgl (a small village in Austria). The hotel is family-owned and builds the foundation of the von der Thannen family history and tradition—a fact that turned this project into something personal and very close to our hearts.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
The client emphasized their family history and how everything started out with a humble Bed & Breakfast. We were also provided with a number of historical items related to the von der Thannen family history, like an old photo archive. After rethinking the project we came up with a branding concept that referred to the origins of their family business. We redesigned the look and feel of the brand with a focus on the von der Thannen family’s exemplary ability to balance tradition with modern convenience and understated luxury.

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project? (fans contacting you, job opportunities, blogs picking it up, etc).
Yes, many people have contacted us, for very different reasons, because of our projects on Behance. Some have questions concerning type, papers, photography etc., while some very nice ones simply get in touch to tell us how much they like our work. Ultimately though, it turned out that Behance is a really good platform for receiving serious requests.

We were also lucky to get an immediate feature on Design made in Germany an important German design blog. Also Page Online, one of Germany’s graphic design magazines, featured us within an article. We are really thankful that a lot of other bloggers helped us by sharing our work in recent years. That was more than we could have hoped for.

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