Archive for March, 2015

#BehanceBook Contest – What’s your Favorite Creative Trend?

To celebrate the launch of “Super-Modified: The Behance Book of Creative Work,” we asked you to share what your favorite creative trend of today is. From flat design to double exposures to cartoon work, you answered! Browse some of our favorite responses below, and congrats to our winners – @artninja, @JClilWu, and @vinedT, who will get a free copy of the book.
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Giveaway! Get your hands on Behance’s first-ever book.

Behance’s first-ever art & design book, featuring content exclusively from the Behance Community, is now out! We’re thrilled to present 288 pages of work that demonstrates how classic approaches to art and design are being subverted, blurred, and reinvented by you, today’s creatives.

We dive in 18 themes, each showcasing work that riff on the idea of “super-modified” creative work. From unexpected uses of humble materials like felt, to how branding is moving far beyond the unchanging logo, to how handmade lettering is making a comeback – it’s clear that exciting things are happening in today’s creative landscape.

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We’re gifting copies of Super-Modified: The Behance Book of Creative Work to some of you, our creative community – without you, this book would quite literally not exist.

Want to enter for a chance to win? Tell us what you think today’s most exciting creative trend is.

Tweet:
[Insert Your favorite creative trend]-on.be.net/behancebook #BehanceBook

 

 

 

SuperModified Debuts: Coffee Table Book Takes Pulse of Creativity Around the World

Today, I’m thrilled to announce the launch of the first-ever art & design coffee table book from Behance & Adobe, Super-Modified: The Behance Book of Creative Work. This gorgeous, 288-page book — curated by our Behance team and published by the renowned Gestalten imprint — surveys the landscape of global creativity and offers keen insight into what’s coming next — and how this vibrant community is pushing us not only to re-imagine classical approaches to design but to broaden the creative canvas into new digital mediums.

Since the early days of Behance, the team has been on a mission to empower creatives to make their ideas happen, and to help their work get noticed by providing them a platform for showcase it. Today, as part of the Adobe family (since 2012), millions of creative professionals use Behance to showcase and discover each other’s work, and, thousands of companies and individuals use the platform to find and hire creative talent.

This activity generates a constant stream of cutting-edge creative work that feeds into Behance as members all over the world upload new projects daily. Together, we believe that if we bring artists and designers from all over the world together to share their portfolios, we can increase the chances of getting great work noticed and connect creatives with opportunity at every level.

For this brand-new book, we asked the curatorial team at Behance to share their take on new directions in art and design work, based on years of reviewing those incoming projects from creatives worldwide. As our curators survey this incredible influx daily, they’re sifting through real-time data about new developments in creativity across fields ranging from fine art and illustration to fashion, photography, Web design and digital art. They are, quite literally, taking the pulse of the creative world every day.

Behance Book

To create a comprehensive narrative for such a broad range of work, we’ve organized their findings into 18 themed chapters that riff on the idea of “super-modified” creative work. Super-Modified looks at how a humble material, like felt, is being remixed in office spaces, character designs and furniture; how recycled design is making everything from discarded aluminum cans to shipping containers fair game for reinvention; and how the grand, cinematic visions of traditional architecture are finding their way into interior spaces.

With the lightning-fast evolution of the creative tools we use to manipulate photos, videos and more, while “reality” was once what you see right in front of you, it’s becoming just one ingredient among many in the end product of innovative creators. There used to be a line where reality ended and the great unknown began — now that line is beyond blurred and new frontiers in what looks and feels “real” are opening up.

From innovative approaches to traditional crafts to unexpected uses of new technology, it’s clear that classical approaches to art and design are being subverted and reinvented by today’s creatives. Their ingenuity and imaginativeness — and their willingness to share it has inspired us, and we hope it does the same for you.

Learn more about the book > book.behance.net

 

Signups are open! Portfolio Review Week #7, May 11-18, 2015

We’re so excited to announce that host signups for Portfolio Review Week #7, May 11-18, 2015, are officially open! Last November, we had nearly 300 reviews across the globe and the events blew us away! (check them out on our Flickr page)

Interested in hosting? Create an event page for RSVP’s on the platform of your choice, then add the event to our brand new Portfolio Reviews Event Page on Behance

Read through the entire hosting process at behance.net/reviews/info.

Just want to attend? Find an event near you!

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“File Not Found” solo exhibition by Chad Wys

From March 12th to March 28th, long time Behance member and superb visual artist, Chad Wys, will be exhibiting his show “File Not Found” at the Joseph Gross Gallery in New York City. Chad’s work combines various forms of classic art forms like painting and sculpture but with a digital era twist.  Chad writes:

“I often think about how we receive the visual information around us, how casually data is exchanged, and how little we tend to pay attention to what we see. The notion of a ‘file’ not being found, or not being accessible, stops us in our tracks and suddenly we desire to see what we’re not able to see. In other words, we’d probably ignore the information if it was presented to us normally, but since it’s not being presented to us, or since it’s not deliverable, our curiosity is stimulated and we suddenly wish to see it, if only to ignore it once again thereafter. I think this applies to the world at large, and certainly to my work, where I often remove data from the audience’s view. We desire and want data until we receive it. We only consider more deeply data that we don’t understand, and we take for granted the data we think we already know,”

 

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