Author Archive: Sarah Rapp

Behind the Project: Infographic Feast

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Ryan MacEachern is a Bristol, UK based design student. His works include a project featured in the curated Branding gallery, as well as an innovative take on the bookmark. We spoke with him about his recent project, “food x design”, an infographic tracing his eating habits over two weeks.

1) What was your inspiration for this project?
I’m currently studying Graphic Design and was an assignment to collect a weeks worth of data on a personal habit and then create an infographic poster.  My biggest inspiration while doing this was a project by Peter Ørntoft called “Information Graphics in Context” that I had seen years ago on Behance. I was astounded by the simple concept and striking visuals and knew I wouldn’t be happy creating a vector based solution if I were to create an infographic myself. So, years later and working on this assignment, it immediately struck me to use actual food to chart my food intake. To my surprise, I couldn’t find any projects online that had used this before.

2) Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I knew I wanted to track my food intake and wanted to create a photographic solution. I briefly explored digital, but it was soon apparent the photographic idea stood out and communicated information more effectively.
I had just started a low carbohydrate diet that was very dull and boring in appearance and considered stopping the diet in order to create a more colorful and varied project. Ultimately, I decided to use the food simply as a visual aid and didn’t directly link it to my actual consumed food.
I’m a capable photographer, but felt overwhelmed by the task ahead of me—I did some test shoots using natural light and the photos needed extensive post-production work. Luckily, a friend was able to help me get ahold of some studio lights and I set them up in my living room. I also spent around £60 on food, which about 2 weeks worth of food on a student’s budget, so I made sure it didn’t go to waste. It was very strange cooking a whole chicken at 3 a.m. just to take photos of it.

3) Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
Loads of blogs have picked it up and I’m getting a steady flow of followers on Behance, but I really didn’t expect it to get such immediate attention. I thought the work was good and nice to look at, but I wasn’t so sure other people would be able to see how much work went into it I’m really glad people like it, Im surprised at how extensive the behance community is I have had people follow me from all over the world which really is a great feeling.

4) Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
This project has two main components: the visual, which in this case is a graph or pie chart, and typography, which communicates all the data and helps the flow. It was challenging to balance them both. Once I chose a font, my next challenge was to adjust lines and labeling to ensure the project wasn’t too crowded with text.

5) Do you feel that this project is “done,” or is there anything you’d like to improve on or change in the future?
The assignment only lasted two weeks, so I’m not sure I worked out all the kinks in the design. I’d like to return to the project soon and make it more extensive, covering other areas, like weight. I’d also like to work more on the coloring.

Best of Digital Publishing Showcased in New Gallery

Our colleagues over at Adobe’s Digital Publishing team just launched one of the coolest uses of the Behance API to date – their own Showcase Gallery.

This new gallery showcases best-in-class apps developed using the Adobe Digital Publishing Suite. Quick background on what the DPS is: it’s a publishing platform that magazines, newspapers (including top publications like The New Yorker and Vanity Fair) use to build mobile apps. Get inspired by how it’s being used today by browsing the gallery!

 

 

 

Live from 99U Pop-Up School

We’re in the midst of the first ever 99U Pop-Up School- a three day event all about super-charging your creative skill set for success in the 21st century. For our inaugural school session, we’ve selected three topics that are essential to making an impact with your ideas — career development, entrepreneurship, andbrand & digital strategy — and built an intensive day-long learning program for each of them.

Day 1 was all about how to build the creative career you want, and had a lineup that included Simon Sinek (author of “Start With Why”), Heidi Grant Halvorson (Associate Director, Columbia University Motivation Science Center), James Victore (Artist & Educator), Ben Barry (Designer & Co-Founder, Facebook Analog Research Lab), and Behance’s own Scott Belsky.

Here are some highlights from the thick of it. Today and tomorrow make sure to:
Follow the conference hashtag: #99school
Follow us on Instagram: 99U 

 

Continue reading…

Behind the Project: Subjective Guide to Life

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Michael Pharaoh is a New Zealand based graphic Designer. His other projects include a rebranding of Cadbury’s chocolate using 3-D modeling and a brand identity for a hypothetical bicycle club. We spoke with him about his recent project Michael’s Guide to Life, a guidebook based on personal experience and advice, modeled after family health books.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I personally just wanted a way to collect what I thought were important pieces of advice or skills I’ve picked up that have helped me through my life. I’ve always liked the design aesthetic of those big family health guidebooks, so I drew inspiration from that and wanted to create one for life.

Behind the Project: Repair Rather Than Replace

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Katie Tonkovitch is a San Francisco based designer. Her other projects include branding for San Francisco dive bar, The Makeout Room as well as timeline based packaging for those trekking through the Himalayas. We spoke with her about her recent project, Mend.

What was your inspiration for this project?
Most of my projects have an element of sustainability to them. The final form was both inspired and limited by existing within those parameters. I think the creative challenge of
balancing aesthetics and function, of striving for both beauty and reusability, was a lot of what made this project successful.

The limited materials I chose drove the design to a high degree. One of the first things I did was hunt down the reusable containers and recycled papers, and make the decision that I was only going to use black ink. Discovering what typefaces and design elements played nicely within those parameters was a large part of my inspiration. For instance, the choice to use colored thread to color-code the different kits was born out of the fact that I limited myself to a single color of ink.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
The design brief was the primary challenge. This was a fairly open-ended student project, so I really wanted to have a fully fleshed-out concept before I even began sketching. I wanted to do something in the world of sustainability, and spent considerable time brainstorming about how buying a new collection of stuff could possibly be a sustainable act. It then occurred to me that if that stuff helped you mend what you already had, it would be preventing you from buying things you didn’t need. The driving concept became: Don’t buy more stuff; mend what you have.

Continue reading…

World Humanitarian Day: Jose Ferreira

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

Jose Ferreira is a photographer based in Portugal, known for fashion and documentary photography. We spoke to him about “Trash Land,” a photojournalism project he completed during a 2011 trip to the only solid waste collection facility in Maputo, the capital of Mozambque. 

 

The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
Union, less corruption, and peace.

Continue reading…

Watch our webinar: Take your work from the Creative Cloud to the community

As you may have noticed, we’ve been busy launching new tools and integration with Adobe Creative Cloud. We think these integrations are an amazing extension of the power of the platform, but with so many new options you may be wondering–what’s the best way to leverage all these new features?

To answer that question, we put together a webinar as part of Adobe’s Ask A Pro series demonstrating how Behance can take your work directly from the cloud and into the creative community on Behance.

Missed it? We recorded the whole thing so you can watch it whenever you want!

In the Ask A Pro session, we cover:

  • See how being on Behance increases the discoverability of your work
  • Share work on Behance easily using your files from Creative Cloud and in CC apps
  • Learn how Behance fits into your Creative Cloud workflow
  • Explore the activity and inspiration stream of Behance on Creative Cloud Desktop
  • Harness the power of the creative community on Behance

To watch the Ask A Pro session, click here

You’ll be prompted to “register” with your Adobe ID, but then you’ll be taken straight to the video of the presentation.

Calling all “Makers!”

Robot makers, 3D Printers, lighting designers, toy and gadget makers – if you’re a “maker” of any sort – we invite you to take part in a new initiative on Stackexchange – a Q&A site for the maker community. It seeks to address two major concerns in the world of Makers: knowledge sharing and attribution. This is just the beginning of the creation of a unified and empowered space for Makers.

Join the Beta:

  1.  Go to the StackExchange maker community proposal.
  2.  If you have an account on Stack Overflow, or any other Stack Exchange site, you should be logged in automatically, but if you aren’t, be sure to click “log in” at the top of the page, so you don’t create a second account.
  3. If you don’t have an existing Stack Exchange account, (or do, and have logged in), click the “Commit” button to the left of the description
  4. Fill out the fields in the commit box that pops up.  Be sure to use an email you can access; you’ll need to be able to open a confirmation email.
  5. Once you commit, you’ll be given a link you can use to invite other experts – feel free to share with anyone you think can contribute to the community.
  6. Important: Go to your email and click the confirmation link.

Behind the Project: A More Playful Packaging

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Steve Simpson is a Dublin, Ireland based illustrator. His projects have ranged from an award –winning projects based on sign language to a children’s book. We spoke with him about his recent project, Illustrated Barcodes, a playful take on a portion of product design most take for granted. 

What was your inspiration for this project?
A few years ago, I was given the chance to design and illustrate a packaging project for an Irish hot sauce company, Mic’s Chilli. I’ve done some graphic design, but I’d primarily been working as an illustrator; to me the 2 disciplines were quite different. So, I decided to treat the design as one big illustration.
By looking at the project from a slightly different angle, I was able to question things I’d previously taken for granted—namely the humble bar code. Did it need to be so ugly? What could I do to make it blend more with the rest of the packaging? I searched the web for answers and rules and was surprised to find very little information on what you could do and what you couldn’t. For the most part it’s been about experimenting and it’s surprising just how far away from the white box, black sticks and digital type face I’ve come.


 

By looking at the project from a slightly different angle, I was able to question things I’d previously taken for granted—namely the humble bar code. Did it need to be so ugly?

 


Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I had collated all the illustrated barcodes from a variety of projects to show as examples to a new client. I hadn’t initially planned on putting them up on Behance but the thought occurred to me that it would be handy to have them all in one place. Continue reading…