Posts in Category "Community"

Most Appreciated Projects: Monthly Roundup

Appreciations are a way to send genuine kudos to another creative professional on Behance. This is our community’s way of curating the network, so that the best projects gain the most exposure. Here’s a look at two of the most appreciated projects on Behance this month:

 Most Appreciated

Maxim Shkret of Krasnador, Russia, re-imagines predators (specifically a bear, fox, and lion) in 3D Vector Graphics. See the full set here (bonus: they’re for sale)!

Most Appreciated

26 letters, 26 materials. FOREAL’s goal was to create a fully sculpted alphabet, using materials ranging from stone and wood to the unexpected (icing, skin, moon, and more)! View The Sculpted Alphabet.

 

 

What have you been working on? #BehanceWIP

We asked our members to share their Work-In-Progress with us on Instagram using the hashtag #BehanceWIP, and we saw some amazing things happening. Now that we’ve entered the new year, we would love for you to continue to share what you are currently working on.

Here are a couple of our favorites.

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Behind the Project: Infographic Feast

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Ryan MacEachern is a Bristol, UK based design student. His works include a project featured in the curated Branding gallery, as well as an innovative take on the bookmark. We spoke with him about his recent project, “food x design”, an infographic tracing his eating habits over two weeks.

1) What was your inspiration for this project?
I’m currently studying Graphic Design and was an assignment to collect a weeks worth of data on a personal habit and then create an infographic poster.  My biggest inspiration while doing this was a project by Peter Ørntoft called “Information Graphics in Context” that I had seen years ago on Behance. I was astounded by the simple concept and striking visuals and knew I wouldn’t be happy creating a vector based solution if I were to create an infographic myself. So, years later and working on this assignment, it immediately struck me to use actual food to chart my food intake. To my surprise, I couldn’t find any projects online that had used this before.

2) Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I knew I wanted to track my food intake and wanted to create a photographic solution. I briefly explored digital, but it was soon apparent the photographic idea stood out and communicated information more effectively.
I had just started a low carbohydrate diet that was very dull and boring in appearance and considered stopping the diet in order to create a more colorful and varied project. Ultimately, I decided to use the food simply as a visual aid and didn’t directly link it to my actual consumed food.
I’m a capable photographer, but felt overwhelmed by the task ahead of me—I did some test shoots using natural light and the photos needed extensive post-production work. Luckily, a friend was able to help me get ahold of some studio lights and I set them up in my living room. I also spent around £60 on food, which about 2 weeks worth of food on a student’s budget, so I made sure it didn’t go to waste. It was very strange cooking a whole chicken at 3 a.m. just to take photos of it.

3) Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
Loads of blogs have picked it up and I’m getting a steady flow of followers on Behance, but I really didn’t expect it to get such immediate attention. I thought the work was good and nice to look at, but I wasn’t so sure other people would be able to see how much work went into it I’m really glad people like it, Im surprised at how extensive the behance community is I have had people follow me from all over the world which really is a great feeling.

4) Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
This project has two main components: the visual, which in this case is a graph or pie chart, and typography, which communicates all the data and helps the flow. It was challenging to balance them both. Once I chose a font, my next challenge was to adjust lines and labeling to ensure the project wasn’t too crowded with text.

5) Do you feel that this project is “done,” or is there anything you’d like to improve on or change in the future?
The assignment only lasted two weeks, so I’m not sure I worked out all the kinks in the design. I’d like to return to the project soon and make it more extensive, covering other areas, like weight. I’d also like to work more on the coloring.

Behind the Project: Subjective Guide to Life

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Michael Pharaoh is a New Zealand based graphic Designer. His other projects include a rebranding of Cadbury’s chocolate using 3-D modeling and a brand identity for a hypothetical bicycle club. We spoke with him about his recent project Michael’s Guide to Life, a guidebook based on personal experience and advice, modeled after family health books.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I personally just wanted a way to collect what I thought were important pieces of advice or skills I’ve picked up that have helped me through my life. I’ve always liked the design aesthetic of those big family health guidebooks, so I drew inspiration from that and wanted to create one for life.

Behind the Project: Repair Rather Than Replace

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Katie Tonkovitch is a San Francisco based designer. Her other projects include branding for San Francisco dive bar, The Makeout Room as well as timeline based packaging for those trekking through the Himalayas. We spoke with her about her recent project, Mend.

What was your inspiration for this project?
Most of my projects have an element of sustainability to them. The final form was both inspired and limited by existing within those parameters. I think the creative challenge of
balancing aesthetics and function, of striving for both beauty and reusability, was a lot of what made this project successful.

The limited materials I chose drove the design to a high degree. One of the first things I did was hunt down the reusable containers and recycled papers, and make the decision that I was only going to use black ink. Discovering what typefaces and design elements played nicely within those parameters was a large part of my inspiration. For instance, the choice to use colored thread to color-code the different kits was born out of the fact that I limited myself to a single color of ink.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
The design brief was the primary challenge. This was a fairly open-ended student project, so I really wanted to have a fully fleshed-out concept before I even began sketching. I wanted to do something in the world of sustainability, and spent considerable time brainstorming about how buying a new collection of stuff could possibly be a sustainable act. It then occurred to me that if that stuff helped you mend what you already had, it would be preventing you from buying things you didn’t need. The driving concept became: Don’t buy more stuff; mend what you have.

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World Humanitarian Day: Jose Ferreira

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

Jose Ferreira is a photographer based in Portugal, known for fashion and documentary photography. We spoke to him about “Trash Land,” a photojournalism project he completed during a 2011 trip to the only solid waste collection facility in Maputo, the capital of Mozambque. 

 

The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
Union, less corruption, and peace.

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World Humanitarian Day: Ashok Sinha & The Cartwheel Initiative

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

We spoke with Ashok Sinha, a New York based photographer and founder of The Cartwheel Initiative, a nonprofit organization that uses creative media to empower children in the aftermath of crisis. Sinha began The Cartwheel Initiative after a 2010 visit to Sri Lanka, noticing the stark difference between the pristine tourist beaches and the obvious trauma visible in northern Jaffna. The organization aims to provide workshops to help youth affected by the war harness art therapeutically, while also sharing their experiences with the world. The program conducted four workshops in Northern Sri Lanka in 2011. The Cartwheel Initiative held another round of workshops this year; films produced by participants will be screened at the Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York. We spoke about his project Children of Post-War Sri Lanka.


The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
Cross-Cultural Understanding

Why is it important that The Cartwheel Initiative reaches out to kids using art?
Art is a non-political tool that can be used to spark conversations and help young people build bridges within their communities and across ethnic and social divisions.



“Art is a non-political tool that can be used to spark conversations and help young people build bridges within their communities and across ethnic and social divisions.”


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Behance Testimonials- Kristen Baird

Kristen Baird is a talented, young jewelry designer based out of Savannah, Georgia and an active Behance and ProSite user. Her artist statement reads:

“As an artist, I design my jewelry to be elegant with a touch of personality and whimsy. I strive to create sculptural pieces that are unique in both form and concept. I enjoy using gold and sterling silver with gemstones and glass for added splashes of color. When worn, I want my jewelry to create an interaction between the wearer and the viewer. Most importantly, my goal is to deliver technically sound, highly crafted jewelry that is beautiful and timeless.” 
 
 
 

Recently, we reached out to her about her experience with Behance and how it has impacted her creative career.

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Calling all “Makers!”

Robot makers, 3D Printers, lighting designers, toy and gadget makers – if you’re a “maker” of any sort – we invite you to take part in a new initiative on Stackexchange – a Q&A site for the maker community. It seeks to address two major concerns in the world of Makers: knowledge sharing and attribution. This is just the beginning of the creation of a unified and empowered space for Makers.

Join the Beta:

  1.  Go to the StackExchange maker community proposal.
  2.  If you have an account on Stack Overflow, or any other Stack Exchange site, you should be logged in automatically, but if you aren’t, be sure to click “log in” at the top of the page, so you don’t create a second account.
  3. If you don’t have an existing Stack Exchange account, (or do, and have logged in), click the “Commit” button to the left of the description
  4. Fill out the fields in the commit box that pops up.  Be sure to use an email you can access; you’ll need to be able to open a confirmation email.
  5. Once you commit, you’ll be given a link you can use to invite other experts – feel free to share with anyone you think can contribute to the community.
  6. Important: Go to your email and click the confirmation link.

Behind the Project: Branding a Family-Owned Ski Resort for a Modern Era

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. This time, we spoke with Bureau Rabensteiner, an Innsbruck, Austria based graphic design studio. Their designs range from thermo sensitive business cards to branding bakeries. We spoke to them about their recent hotel branding project for the Trofana Alpin.

What was your inspiration for this project?
The Trofana Alpin was the very first hotel in the winter sports resort of Ischgl (a small village in Austria). The hotel is family-owned and builds the foundation of the von der Thannen family history and tradition—a fact that turned this project into something personal and very close to our hearts.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
The client emphasized their family history and how everything started out with a humble Bed & Breakfast. We were also provided with a number of historical items related to the von der Thannen family history, like an old photo archive. After rethinking the project we came up with a branding concept that referred to the origins of their family business. We redesigned the look and feel of the brand with a focus on the von der Thannen family’s exemplary ability to balance tradition with modern convenience and understated luxury.

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project? (fans contacting you, job opportunities, blogs picking it up, etc).
Yes, many people have contacted us, for very different reasons, because of our projects on Behance. Some have questions concerning type, papers, photography etc., while some very nice ones simply get in touch to tell us how much they like our work. Ultimately though, it turned out that Behance is a really good platform for receiving serious requests.

We were also lucky to get an immediate feature on Design made in Germany an important German design blog. Also Page Online, one of Germany’s graphic design magazines, featured us within an article. We are really thankful that a lot of other bloggers helped us by sharing our work in recent years. That was more than we could have hoped for.

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