Posts tagged "Chrome"

BrowserLab adds Chrome 18 support

BrowserLab v1.6.6 is now live, and contains the following changes:

  • Chrome 18 support (Windows)
  • New login screen

If you have any problems logging in to BrowserLab, please clear your cache and restart your browser, then try again. We made some significant changes to the login mechanism, so this step may be necessary.

We will update BrowserLab again soon to add the latest Flash Player, and a newer version of Firefox.

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager
twitter: @brucebowman

BrowserLab 1.6.4 with new Chrome and Firefox browsers is now live

Today we have released a new version of BrowserLab for you, v1211P.312309, with updated browsers, security patches and some minor improvements:

  • Chrome 14 was added (Windows), and Chrome 11 was removed
  • Firefox 7 was added (Mac OS X and Windows), and Firefox 4 was removed
  • Safari was updated to 5.1 (Mac OS X)
  • Flash Player was updated to 10.3.183.10 (Mac OS X and Windows)

We will include Flash Player 11 in our next update.

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager
twitter: @brucebowman

BrowserLab 1.6.3 with new Mac OS X browsers is now live

Today we have released a new version of BrowserLab for you, v1168P.306117, which has some nice improvements:

  • Chrome 13 beta was updated to the final release (Windows)
  • Firefox 4 was added (Mac OS X)
  • Firefox 5 was added (Mac OS X)
  • Flash Player was updated to v10.3 (Mac OS X)

We also updated our BrowserLab for Firebug Add-on for Firebug 1.8. You can find it on the Mozilla Add-ons page, or if you already have it installed, it will be updated when you update your Add-ons.

Finally, we have removed support for some older browsers now that they’ve significantly declined in usage. Safari 4 (Mac OS X), and Firefox 3 and 3.6 (Mac OS X and Windows) have been removed.

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager
twitter: @brucebowman

BrowserLab v1.6.2 with Firefox 5 and Chrome 13 support is now live

This afternoon, we released BrowserLab v1.6.2 which includes the following changes:

  • Chrome 13 (Windows) support has been added
  • Firefox 5 (Windows) support has been added
  • A fix that improves BrowserLab’s support for sites built with the SilverStripe CMS
  • Additional bug fixes and improvements

Someday in the not too distant future, we’re going to remove Firefox 3.0 and 3.6 from BrowserLab. If you’re wondering why we would remove support for older browsers, it is to keep BrowserLab lean and mean, and keep our backend costs in check. We can’t keep older browsers around forever, and we’ve seen significant drop-off in market share for these older versions. If you have objections to this, please let us know why. You can let us know how you feel by posting here in the Comments, or on our BrowserLab User Forums.

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager
twitter: @brucebowman

BrowserLab 1.6.1 is live: now with Chrome 11

Today we rolled out BrowserLab v1.6.1 which includes some nice changes:

  • Chrome 11 (Windows) was added, and Chrome 9 was removed
  • We’ve added an in-client poll/survey that asks you 2 simple questions. Please take the survey as it will only take you a minute, and it will help us measure and improve the service
  • We fixed several bugs, including some fixes for isses we had loading pages that use Modernizr
  • We increased the maximum range value for our Delay feature from 10 to 20 seconds

We recently spoke to some BrowserLab users that were not aware of the Delay feature in BrowserLab. If you’ve never tried it, the Delay feature allows you to specify how long BrowserLab should wait after loading your page before the screenshots are taken. This is useful when you have dynamic content such as movies, animations, etc that needs time to load or play before you want your screenshot to be taken. Generally, you’ll want to leave the Delay set to 0 unless your content is not loading, or it will needlessly increase the time it takes to return your screenshots.

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager
twitter: @brucebowman

New BrowserLab v1.6 Coming Soon!

Next week, we’ll be launching a new version of BrowserLab with some new features that we think will help you work more quickly and productively.

  • You’ll now be able to follow links in BrowserLab. As you mouse around over the screenshots, you’ll see the cursor switch to the Hand cursor when you’re over a link that BrowserLab can follow. Hold Control (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) then click the link to have BrowserLab follow that link and request screenshots.
  • There will be a new URL History feature, that will keep track of the tests you’ve been doing, and allow you to quickly reload them. This will work very similarly to how the Back and Forward buttons work in a browser. You’ll also be able to click the Address Bar to drop down a list of all of your recent tests, then choose a specific item. When you use the URL History, we’ll quickly reload any cached screenshots, so in most cases they will not need to be re-requested from our browser servers. Of course, you can always use the Refresh button to force the screenshots to be re-requested if you like.
  • We’ve expanded our language support to include Spanish and Italian language versions.
  • Safari 3, Firefox 2, and older Chrome browsers will be removed, as their usage levels have dropped to the point that keeping them in BrowserLab is no longer needed.

Watch this short video on AdobeTV that shows the new features being used to test a site in BrowserLab.

We hope you enjoy BrowserLab, and these new improvements. We’d love to hear from you in the comments.

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager
twitter: @brucebowman

Release 1.5.3 adds Chrome 10, IE 9 & Firefox 4 RC

BrowserLab 1.5.3 is now live!

As part of our ongoing efforts to keep the browsers in BrowserLab current and relevant, we’ve released BrowserLab v1.5.3 today.  This release added Chrome 9 and 10 (Windows), Internet Explorer 9, and Firefox 4 RC (Windows). In addition, we’ve updated Safari to 5.0.4 (OS X).

When we do these kinds of releases, we also update our browser servers to include the latest system updates and security patches. The other notable change we made was to enable Font Smoothing on our Windows Server 2003 browser servers – now all of our browser servers have Font Smoothing enabled.

Tell a friend about BrowserLab! We need your help to raise awareness. In addition to this blog, there are a few ways to stay in touch with us:
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/browserlab
Twitter: @adobebrowserlab, @brucebowman
BrowserLab User Forums: http://forums.adobe.com/community/cslive/browserlab

Next up: we’re working on more browser updates for OS X, as well as an update for our BrowserLab for Firebug extension so it will work with Firebug 1.7. You can expect these changes to come soon.

We’d love to hear from you in the comments!

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager

Using Web Fonts with BrowserLab

Before wide browser support for the CSS @font-face rule, web pages were limited to “browser safe fonts.” This meant the designer was constrained to using fonts that were available on every visitor’s machine. @font-face allows a web designer to make typeface decisions based on aesthetics rather than availability.

All modern browsers now support web fonts, in some form. Microsoft Internet Explorer has supported @font-face since 1997 in version 4, Apple Safari implemented support in 2008 in version 3.1, Mozilla Firefox added support in 2009 in version 3.5, and Google Chrome added support in 2010 in version 6.

Adobe BrowserLab has full support for @font-face. BrowserLab can help you ensure your @font-face declarations are working across multiple browsers. By giving you the ability to quickly test your @font-face declaration across target browsers, you can move on to designing the rest of your site. Give BrowserLab a try with your web fonts enabled pages.

When using @font-face you need to be aware of supported font formats and browser specific syntax.  There is currently no universally supported web font format. Failing to provide proper font formats and browser supported CSS will result in your page rendering inconsistently across browsers.  If done incorrectly, visitors will see the browser’s default font instead of the specified font.

There are some great font services that take care of cross browser support by dynamically generating the appropriate CSS for each browser. Typekit, Webtype, WebINK, and Fonts.com are some of the services available, and all of them generally take care of hosting and licensing. Using one of these services allows the quickest path to implementation without having to know too much about the underlying technology. Typekit provides many fonts created by Adobe, and we are working together to offer more Adobe fonts in the future.

If you find yourself needing to roll your own web fonts, there are a few basics that are required to ensure your intended fonts show up on all browsers:

First, and most importantly: Ensure your font license allows you to use a font on the web. Many foundries do not permit the use of their desktop fonts on the web. For more information, check out the Adobe Type blog on this subject.

Know your font formats. There are a few different versions of web fonts in use today.

  • Embedded OpenType (.eot) – Supported by Internet Explorer only.
  • TrueType/OpenType (.ttf/.otf) – Supported by the widest range of browsers, but, not supported in Internet Explorer. (this may change in IE9)
  • Web Open Font Format  (.woff) – Supported in recent versions of Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer, but not yet supported in Safari.

In addition to needing to worry about licenses and multiple font formats, browsers interpret CSS code differently, so writing a rule to include your fonts is less than straightforward. “Bulletproof” syntax for @font-face has evolved over the years to work around browser inconsistencies. Much of the syntax seems repetitive and counter intuitive. For a good history of @font-face and a clear explanation of the CSS syntax read the “The New Bulletproof @Font-Face Syntax” blog post at Fontspring. Learning how the syntax has evolved gives a clearer picture of how each browser handles @font-face.

FontSquirrel is a web service that will convert fonts for you and generate CSS code.  After uploading your fonts, FontSquirrel will convert your fonts for cross browser usage and generate CSS for you. The CSS code generated by FontSquirrel also happens to work just about everywhere, including mobile devices. If you use FontSquirrel to generate web fonts, make sure you have the proper license to do so.

I hope this brief introduction to web fonts has been helpful, and that you find BrowserLab to be a useful tool in helping you test your pages with web fonts.

Shout out to Paul Irish, Christopher Slye on the Adobe Type team, and Fontspring for their help and insight on web fonts.

Charlie Scheinost
Adobe BrowserLab Software Engineer

Release 1.5.2.2 adds Chrome 8 and an IE9 update

BrowserLab 1.5.2.2 is now live, and ready for you to use. In this version, we’ve added Google Chrome 8 for Windows, and an updated Internet Explorer 9 beta.

Have you told anyone about BrowserLab? We could use your help in raising awareness – please help us spread the word in the web community.

In addition to this blog, there are a a few ways to stay in touch with us:
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/browserlab
Twitter: @adobebrowserlab, @brucebowman
BrowserLab User Forums: http://forums.adobe.com/community/cslive/browserlab

This is most likely our last blog post for the year. As we leave 2010 behind, we’re very excited about all of the new features we’re working on – 2011 is going to be a great year for the BrowserLab service!

Season’s greetings, and Happy New Year!

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager

BrowserLab 1.5.2 is live: adds new browser support

In a previous blog post, we told you that some browser changes were coming. We’re happy to let you know that our BrowserLab v1.5.2 release is live, and you can now use BrowserLab with the latest versions of Internet Explorer 9 (beta), Firefox 4 Windows (beta) and Chrome 7 Windows, which has replaced Chrome 3.

In our next release, which will be early in 2011, we’re planning to add Chrome 8 for Windows and OS X, and any updates for our beta browsers. We’re also planning on removing Safari 3 and Firefox 2 at that time.

With the addition of these new browsers, and the support we already have for Safari 5, you’ve got an excellent test environment for helping you test with a wide range of browsers, from the legacy browsers like IE 6/7 to the newest browsers that support HTML5 and CSS3.

We hope you enjoy them! We’d love to hear from you in the Comments.

Bruce Bowman
Adobe BrowserLab product manager
twitter: @brucebowman