January 24, 2011

eSeminar Now Available: Creating Effective eLearning with the Segmenting Principle

Each week I describe an element of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia eLearning and give examples of how to implement that principle using Adobe Captivate and Adobe eLearning Suite. Part 8 of 10 in the Creating effective eLearning Modules Series (Segmenting): http://adobe.ly/dQ8ZGo

The focus of the eSeminar was on the segmenting principle. We focused on creating effective eLearning content, utilizing the Segmenting Principle to facilitate better learning. The segmenting principle indicates that learning is more effective when information or ideas … are provided in quantities that are appropriate for the audience. Generally we see this as providing smaller ‘bite size chunks’ for new learners attempting to learn complex tasks. There are however other cases and other ways we can use segmenting or chunking to increase the likelihood that the learning will be effective and transfer well. More after the jump…

The segmenting principle is deeply rooted in cognitive theory, specifically the notion that our short term working memory can only handle a limited amount of new information at any given time. Segmenting – seeks to leverage that, by providing the right amount of information, and by organizing that information in ways that are conducive to learning and facilitate transfer of that learning into applied situations.

I’ve included a link to the downloadable version of the slides (this one includes my speaking notes) and have given the usual embedded version below for your convenience.

During the session I used a Captivate movie to demonstrate many of the core concepts behind the segmenting principle. That movie is embedded below so you can tinker and see how it works. You can also download the source code for this demo here.

Below are the URL’s to the Multimedia session, along with links to the others in the series, also included are those which are coming in the future.

Available Now On Demand:

Part 1:Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules

LINK: http://bit.ly/aPCSxb

Part 2: Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules: Balancing cognitive load in eLearning content with Adobe Captivate 5

LINK: http://bit.ly/boLHVX

Part 3: Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules: Applying Personalization to eLearning with Adobe Captivate 5

LINK: http://bit.ly/bkj7dP

Part 4:Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules: The Multimedia Principle

LINK: http://bit.ly/aCHm2e

Part 5:Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules: The Contiguity Principle

LINK: http://bit.ly/gvbcLP

Part 6:Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules: The Redundancy Principle

LINK: http://adobe.ly/ekOKz2

Part 7:Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules: The Coherence Principle

LINK: http://adobe.ly/eI4N9i

Part 8:Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules: The Segmenting Principle

LINK: http://adobe.ly/dQ8ZGo

Upcoming:

January 19 – Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules Part 9: Pre-training

http://bit.ly/dj0uHG

This one hour session hosted by Dr. Allen Partridge, Adobe eLearning Evangelist, will focus on creating effective eLearning content. The session focuses on the Multimedia eLearning Design Principle known as pre-training, which suggests that elearning content authors should first build up basic information about essential elements which are pre-requisites to understanding the larger concepts. Examples will focus on the use of Quizzes, the Quiz Results Analyzer and the Table of Contents in Adobe Captivate 5.

February 9 – Making Effective Adobe Captivate eLearning Modules Part 10: Individual Differences

http://bit.ly/bvrOO6

Dr. Allen Partridge, Adobe eLearning Evangelist, will present a one hour online eSeminar for users of Adobe Captivate and / or Adobe eLearning Suite. The session focuses on the Multimedia eLearning Design Principle known as the Individual Differences Principle, which suggests that design effects are stronger for low-knowledge learners than for high knowledge learners, and for high-spatial learners rather than for low-spatial learners. Examples will focus on the use of Advanced Actions, ADA/508 Compliance, Closed Captions, Localization, Video Closed Caption, Branching and User Variables in Adobe Captivate 5.

Want to do more reading? Here’s a brief list of recommended supplemental reading:

Clark & Mayer (2007.) eLearning: and the Science of Instruction http://amzn.to/chkPuw (Links to Amazon – but this book is pretty widely available.)

A short but clear overview of the history of learning theory.

Posted by Allen Partridge11:09 PM
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