Posts in Category "Recording"

MP4 Recording Conversion Update

MP4 recording conversion functionality was recently unavailable for all Adobe Connect Hosted Accounts.

Note: Offline FLV recording conversion was unaffected and remains fully operational.

Update: 09 July

There is a workaround in place, as of 10:30 EST, to get the MP4 conversions back on track. Any job that was submitted prior to this may continue to throw an error to the user in the web app. Here is the way ahead:

• If you submitted a job this morning and the web app shows a conversion error, re-submit the job
• The queue is very long right now and it may take longer than normal for the conversions to finish.
• If you recently submitted a job, within the last hour or so, report all any new problems to the adobe support team.

Offline FLV Archives Fast-forward during Playback

With Flash Player version, the Nellymoser audio codec used within Connect offline FLV Meeting archives played automatically in fast forward. This issue is resolved in the latest Flash Player.

The solution is to install Flash Player version (or later depending on when you run into this issue) and all effected Connect FLV meeting archives will play normally.




XML API TIPS: Moving Archives That Have Been Repaired

One common workaround that customers do (or Adobe support may do on behalf of customers) to fix recordings that have some sort of sync or playback issue, is to download the archive (recording) zip, potentially run it through a repair tool, and then re-upload the zip package back to Connect as a content object in the ‘Content’ directory.  A common request may be to move that archive from the Content directory, to another location or even back underneath the Meeting’s ‘Recording’ directory.  The problem is that with failed recordings (recordings that didn’t fully process) and/or re-uploaded recordings, they will not have a ‘date-end’ parameter for the sco, like normal recordings do.  So when you try to (for example) move the archive to the original Meeting’s Recordings directory (which can really only be done using the API), you will get the following error:

API Call = Sco-Move:


where sco-id = the sco-id of the re-uploaded archive
where folder-id = the sco-id of the original meeting (which is also the sco-id of the Recordings directory for that meeting)


<status code=”invalid”>
<invalid field=”sco-id” type=”string” subcode=”recording-is-in-progress“/>

This is because the sco does not have a date-end param/value.  You can see this by running the sco-info call on the sco-id.  You will see no date-end.

What you need to do before you can move the sco, is set a date-end param using the sco-update API.  You would set the date-end value to some date in the past.

Here is an example:



<status code=”ok”/>

Now, when you do a sco-info on that sco you should see the date-end param and value.

You can now also move the recording to it’s desired location (say back to the Meeting’s recording directory):



<status code=”ok”/>

Adobe Connect Add-in Compatibility with the Google Chrome Browser

Updated January 27, 2015:

Note: This article only applies to Adobe Connect on-premise server deployments. Adobe Connect hosted clients are unaffected.

The Google Chrome browser is currently shipping with two versions of the Flash plugin.  The default PPAPI and also the NPAPI Flash plug-in. The following versions of Adobe Connect installations are incompatible out of the box with the default PPAPI plug-in:

  • 9.1.2
  • 9.1.1
  • 9.0.1 – 9.0.4
  • 8.2.2

PPAPI plug-in incompatibility results in the Adobe Connect Add-in not being detected and launched in Chrome when invoked in a Connect Meeting. Even if the Add-in is installed, the meeting opens in the browser and not in the Connect Add-in. Upon attempting to share ones screen (a Connect feature supported in the Add-in but not in the browser), the following message appears:


Google Chrome, with the release of Version 40, will no longer use their whitelist to allow NPAPI  plugins to run without requiring approval: Chrome users will not be able to use the Adobe Connect Add-in for the above listed versions of Connect. To address this problem, Adobe is patching the following Connect versions for use with Chrome:

  • 9.1.2
  • 9.1.1
  • 9.0.4
  • 8.2.2

These patches will fix the incompatibility problems with the PPAPI plug in. Adobe Connect servers that are not running one of these versions (or a later version) will need to be upgraded to the nearest later version to the one currently installed and then apply the appropriate Connect PPAPI patch.

There should not be any change in the behavior for Flash Player NPAPI in January because Flash Player is not listed among the applications  that are going to be removed in January:

Workarounds until the patches are available:

  • You can attend Adobe Connect Meetings without the Adobe Connect Add-in, however the Add-in is required for enhanced functionality like screen sharing and making offline recordings.
  • Turn off auto-upate in Chrome so that you do not upgrade to a version of Chrome that is problematic.
  • Alternatively you can use any browser other than Chrome with Adobe Connect.
  • Manually enable NPAPI by clicking on the “Plug-in blocked” message in the URL bar and choosing “Always allow plug-ins on [website]”



Note: In April 2015, this will no longer be an option as NPAPI support will be disabled by default in Chrome and Google will un-publish extensions requiring NPAPI plugins from the Chrome Web Store. Google will however provide an override for advanced users in the form of an ‘enable-npapi’ flag and enterprise policy to temporarily re-enable NPAPI.

Make Certain that Content is Replicated Across All Servers in a Connect Cluster

Occasionally a specific piece of content may be intermittently available in a cluster. It could be Presenter or Captivate published on-demand content or even content within a Meeting room. Sometimes in these cases, the content published on one server is not replicated to all servers in the cluster. There are a few quick things to check:

First: Note that with Adobe Connect 9, the installer includes a cluster option. If you begin with a single server installation and expand later to a clustered environment by adding a server or servers, you will need to manually make the following change in the /appserv/conf/server.xml file in order to enable communication over port 8507 among clustered servers. It is prudent to double check this in the server.xml file after installing even if the cluster option was selected during installation:

<Executor name=”clusterThreadPool”
namePrefix=”cluster-8507-” maxThreads=”150″

<!– Define a non-SSL HTTP/1.1 Connector on port 8507 –>
<!– Used for HTTP access for intra-Cluster communications. –>
<!– Equivalent to JRun CLUSTER_PORT –>
<!– Uncomment for clustered deployments
<Connector port=”8507″ protocol=”HTTP/1.1″

Second: Test the 8507 port communications on each server: From a command prompt on each server, type netstat –an|find “8507” and check to be sure that 8507 is active and listening on each.

netstat -an|find “8507”


Use telnet to test connectivity on  8507 between Connect servers. Use telnet to check both IP and machine-name as well.

telnet server-machine-name 8507

telnet 8507.fw

Note: The machine name appears to the left of the FQDN under the Connect Servers Setting on port 8510 locally on any server in the cluster; here I have artificially designated them as server1 and server2.


Be sure to check telnet connectivity from and to every server in the cluster:

telnet 8507.fw

If the IP works with telnet and the machine-name does not work, it may be necessary to add entries in DNS or add hosts files to each server:


Check the software-based firewall on the server to see if it is potentially blocking replication traffic:

netsh firewall show config



Note: Connect does not support dual stack ipv6 and ipv4 on the same server.

Note: If problems are noticed in the Meeting rooms, check port 8506; it is used for Meeting communication among the servers.

Third: Examine the Connect logs: Look first in the debug.log under the \logs\support directory and search on the string: cluster-  If replication is taking place, you will see this repeating cluster- entry logging the replication activity. Absence of these log entries will indicate that replication is not working:

[10-1 12:00:00,009] cluster-8507-630 (INFO) CLUSTER Sent file: \7\xxx-xxxx\fcs-meeting\public\all\224_XXX_4.fso 9978 bytes 12 ms 6371 kbps to: server1


Check for any error messages in these replication log entries. Search also for the word lucene. If you see a preponderance of lucene lock errors, contact Adobe Enterprise Support: and provide a log snippet to expedite diagnosis.

Also check the error.log files for the entry  CLUSTER_CON_BROKEN

2014-10-02 15:28:48 “Server server1 unable to reach server2 on port 8507 to perform cluster operations.” CLUSTER  CLUSTER_CON_BROKEN

Fourth: Check the timing of active anti-virus scanning of the content directories \content\7\ on each server; compare the directory sizes on each server to see is there if a significant size delta. Antivirus software can impede replication in manner that is not uniform across servers; active scanning of the content directory during replication may lock the content files. Active scanning after hours or during a window when publishing is unlikely is prudent.

Fifth: Check the updater page. Make sure you are on the latest patches servers-side. Keep in mind that 9.2 is a full installer and not a patch. For full installers, use LWS

These steps will solve most replication problems that you encounter. If problems persist, contact our  Enterprise Support Team.

Adobe Connect Offline Recording Option Captures and Records Local Client Screen Activity

Adobe Connect Offline Recording Option Captures & Records Local Screen Assets:

While in the process of creating an offline recording in Connect, the recording will capture extraneous desktop application activity if Windows is in Non-Aero mode

To stop extraneous recording,  turn on the Aero theme: Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Personalization – choose any Aero theme.


This workaround will limit the offline recording to the Connect Meeting archive.

Here is the related forum discussion for reference:

Specifications for MP4 Conversion for Connect Recordings

Here are the specifications for the MP4 conversion; they are similar to our FLV specifications albeit with better compression:

  • Resolution: 1024X768
  • Frames Per Second: 8 FPS
  • Video Bitrate: 1024kbps
  • Audio:
    • Codec – AAC (Advanced Audio Codec)
    • Profile – Main@3.1
    • Bit Rate – ~55Kbps (VBR)
    • Channels – 1 (Mono)
    • Sampling rate – 44.1Khz

Estimating the Size of Archive Meeting Recordings

I was recently asked if I had any test data showing how big a recording becomes based on the use case during the Connect Meeting being recorded. While plenty of anecdotal information exists,  I thought it prudent to begin a list of use cases and show what the size was after five minutes of each use case. This article will be a work in progress as I add different use cases in order to offer various concrete examples to use as a basis to estimate recording size based on what is being recorded, whether multiple Video pod camera feeds or screen-sharing or VoIP, etc. Among its purposes, this exercise will help meeting hosts to avoid exceeding the 2GB limit on Adobe hosted clusters for recording size.

Most relevant among the variables considered is the notion that recording size is affected by the streams present in the meeting being recorded. Typically a Video pod with VoIP (640X480) shared per hour will result in an FLV of around 200MB. Sharing a screen in a meeting (1680X1050) will result in an FLV size of around 150 MB. PPT/PPTX files uploaded to a meeting room and displayed while recording will not play a significant part in recording size because the recordings link to external content rather than contain that content intrinsically. For example,  a meeting with two Video pod streams could have recording size of around 400MB and a meeting having a single Video pod stream with VoIP and screen-sharing could end up around 350MB. The actual results may differ as the screen resolution of the publisher, the type of sharing and the amount of movement are all variables that can affect recording size: If there is little movement on screen or in the Video pod stream, the recording size will be less than it would be with a lot of movement.

Here are some concrete examples to use for planning; each recording is approximately five minutes in length:

A meeting with a single video feed for the Presenter to display and scroll through an uploaded PowerPoint file while using integrated telephony:Title: Recording Size Test_0
Type: Recording
Duration: 00:05:31
Disk usage: 8335.3 KB



A recording of a meeting with six video feeds and an uploaded PowerPoint file
Title: Planning Troubleshooting and Support Meeting Room _15
Type: Recording
Duration: 00:05:48
Disk usage: 13873.8 KB



A recording of a meeting with four video feeds and screen sharing an application with normal activity
Title: Planning Troubleshooting and Support Meeting Room _16
Type: Recording
Duration: 00:05:56
Disk usage: 21660.8 KB


More examples to follow.

How long does it take to publish Connect recordings as MP4s?

An MP4 recording will be published and posted within 24 hours of invoking the conversion.

  • the actual amount of time it takes to convert a recording depends on many factors including:
  • the length of recording
  • the queue of recordings to be published on the publishing servers
  • the queue of recordings within Connect prior to transfer to the publishing servers (they are submitted in parallel to the conversion servers)
  • the time it takes to download the converted MP4s from the conversion servers back to Connect
  • and variables commensurate with asynchronous processing

Note also that if for any reason the conversion to MP4 should fail,  we will retry multiple times depending on the cause of the failure. Retries will extend the processing time required before the recording is available. The two most significant variables are the length of the recording and how many recordings are ahead in the queue.

Controlling Recording Playback through the URL

When added to a Connect archive recording URL, the following suffixed commands will force the prescribed behavior. This may help with projects that include the embedding of archive recording URLs.

  • pbEIOpen=true – the event index would come up opened
  • pbEIOpen=false – the event index would come up closed
  • pbEIOverlay=true – the event index would show up in overlay mode
  • pbEIOverlay=false – the event index would show up in persistent mode
  • pbMode=normal – open in normal playback mode
  • pbMode=edit – open in editing mode
  • archiveOffset=parameter in milliseconds – open to a specific time in the recording

You can modify the URLs along these lines; use an “&” to concatenate multiple parameters.

Every recording will automatically append ?launcher=false&fcsContent=true. You cannot play a recording in the Connect Meeting addin; if you append ?launcher=true, it will toggle to ?launcher=false and open the recording in the browser:

This URL is an example of what a normal URL would look like during recording playback:

To change this to open with the index closed, append pbEIOpen=false like this: