Articles categorized under Video

Get Out There and #CreateNow

There’s inspiration everywhere, but we tend to miss it in the chaos and speed of our daily lives. So, we set out to create Random Acts of Creativity around the world, partnering with artists to generate moments in public that get people to stop in their tracks.

Artists have done a handful of Random Acts but this was just the kick off – there’s so much more we can do, and we can’t do it alone. To make a real impact, we need your ideas. And maybe with a little help from us, we can work together to make them happen.

Share your Random Acts of Creativity ideas with us. Leave logistics, such as funding needs, off the table for now. What would you beautify in this world? Where would you do it? No idea is too big or too small. Tell us your concepts and we may surprise you with creativity starter kits to get you going. We may also help sponsor a random act that you’d like to see come to life in your local communities.

It’s easy to get started. Simply share your ideas using #CreateNow on your social network of choice – i.e., tweet us your idea, share an Instagram of your inspiration, etc. – by Friday, August 1.

Already doing a Random act of Creativity? Tag your project on Behance with ‘createnow.’ We’re curating a Collection of the Random Acts and want to include yours.

The AYV Awards Narrative Winners: Empowering Creativity and Encouraging Change

Creativity takes many forms, but the winners of the Adobe Youth Voices awards prove that its highest purpose is social impact. Through their inspiring digital media creations, these 13-19 year-old students showcase powerful messages, from creative empowerment to embracing diversity. We’ve already heard from the Poster Campaign and Documentary winners, so this week we’re taking a deeper look into this year’s Narrative winners to find out what drives them to create change.

1st Prize: Vanished

13% of drivers age 18-20 involved in car accidents admitted to texting or talking on their phones at the time of the crash, but 77% of young adults are confident that they can safely text while behind the wheel.[1] After seeing many of their friends tempted to text and drive, Venessa Fuentes and Alicia Carchitorena felt compelled to produce a film that would drive the message home in a new way.

Filmed from the perspective of a teenage girl who lost her life while texting and driving, Vanished clearly shows viewers what a tragic toll this seemingly innocent act can have as she walks through the various facets of what was once her everyday life.

“Everyone has some talent within them,” says Alicia. “You don’t die alone – all your dreams and passions die with you.” Inspired by the Freedom Writers’ message, “What will you leave behind?”, the girls hope their video inspires others to lead long lives of  value and meaning.

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2nd Prize: Aspaunity

The splash of paint on canvas, the tapping of heels on the ground, and the hum of a computer as it turns on. It’s all part of the creative process. And yet, says the team behind this film, there isn’t one word to describe that moment and its significance.

Enter “Aspaunity,” a new word created by high school students Josh Gutierrez, Lizbeth Cisneros, Denise Panuco, Jesus Gonzalez and Jonathan Carrasco to describe the creative process. Inspired by the AYV program and its teachings, their film encourages others to express this creativity freely and to catalyze positive change.  “There’s much more to it than just creating. The challenge is finding a way to ignite someone else’s passion, spark, inner voice and dreams,” says Josh.

Wondering how to kick-start your creative process? Try watching their film:

3rd Prize: Get A Life!

In the short film Get a Life, Bianca Toderean and Paul Turean showcase the importance of living life beyond the walls of technology and cell phones. By showing how valuable in-person interactions and friendships can be, these 11th grade students from Romania hope to encourage people across the world to get off their computers, out of their rooms, and into the real world.

 Patrica Cogley is senior program manager, Adobe Youth Voices.

 

 

[1] Stop Text Stop Wrecks. (16 July, 2014). Retrieved from http://www.stoptextsstopwrecks.org/#facts.

A Funny Thing Happened on The Way to The Press Release….or How I Learned to Love Adobe Voice

AdobeVoice logo

Today Adobe Voice was launched, a new free “storytelling” app for iPad. The press release can be seen here.

We, here in the propaganda department of Adobe, had a chance to play with an early version. And this came about in an unusual way. As our press release for Adobe Voice went up the approval chain, it reached our CEO, Shantanu Narayen. Shantanu looked at the PR and said to me, “Where’s the Voice version of the press release?” Two things occurred to me at this point:

1.     Why hadn’t I thought of that?

2.     I guess that’s why Shantanu is CEO.

Anyhow, suitably chastised I got on the pre-release program, downloaded the app to my iPad and boldly set out to create my first “Voice Video”.  It was a revelation and 15 minutes later I’d created a pretty polished piece that supported the announcement. The app is very easy to use and there’s a touch of whimsy in the way you search for and select icons and music. It was a ton of fun.

On a way to a meeting with my boss that afternoon I bumped into Adobe’s Chief Marketing Officer, Ann Lewnes, in the coffee room. I showed her my creation on my iPad. She thought it was great but then said: “Get Alex Amado to do the voiceover”. Alex is Adobe’s creativemeister, working on the look and feel of the marketing campaigns that support Adobe products. He also moonlights, on many Adobe official videos, as our voiceover man. I was slightly taken aback, what was possibly wrong with my voice?

I went home and showed my wife and our 15 year-old son, Connor, my Voice Video. His first reaction: “Dad, you sound ridiculously Scottish…..were you hamming it up?” So now it all made sense. Even after 17 years in California, when confronted with talking into a microphone, I had defaulted into Rob Roy McGregor. Connor then whisked the iPad out of my hands and started to create his first Voice Video in support of a high school book report.

Back at Adobe’s San Jose HQ the next day, Alex sent Ann a new version of the press release Voice Video, using a preposterous faux-Scottish accent that halfway through seemed to morph into a slightly raddled 18th century Dubliner. This caused much hilarity and sharing internally.

So why do I tell you all this? Adobe Voice seems to be one of those apps that really does engage, spark conversations, and prompt viral sharing. Everybody who sees a Voice Video immediately wants to access the app and try it for themselves. So here’s Alex’s finished Video….and I do have to admit it’s better than mine.

This is just the first version of Adobe Voice and the team is looking forward to hearing your feedback and seeing where the feature set should go. Myself, I’ve already requested the Scottish Accent Dampening Algorithm, which I’m sure our busy and talented audio engineers are hard at work on! Download the app here.

Adobe Announces Primetime 2.0; Drives TV Everywhere Forward

Our team has been busy at The NAB Show in Las Vegas this week and we’re excited to announce some major updates to Adobe Primetime – the industry’s most advanced TV delivery and monetization platform for programmers and pay-TV service providers. This latest release of Adobe Primetime takes advantage of the latest industry innovations and introduces new capabilities that drive strong viewer engagement and greater flexibility for monetization.

With Adobe Primetime 2.0, broadcasters and pay-TV providers can tap into a new cloud ad insertion service (available today) to insert ads into live, linear and on-demand content across any platform/device. We also unveiled Concurrency Monitoring as an extension to our Emmy award-winning Primetime PayTV Pass service, allowing customers to manage the number of streams accessed across each device. Aside from desktop operating systems, SmartTVs, Android and iOS devices, Adobe Primetime 2.0 now supports XBox 360 gaming consoles and Roku devices.

Additional capabilities in Adobe Primetime (coming later this year) being demonstrated at The NAB Show include support for MPEG-DASH and the new ultra high definition television (UHDTV) standard, which will allow media companies to deliver content across 4K enabled SmartTVs and other IP-connected devices. Check out our full announcement for all the details.

A Preview of 4K UHDTV Support, Powered by Adobe Primetime

A Preview of 4K UHDTV Support, Powered by Adobe Primetime

It’s been a year since Adobe Primetime launched at The 2013 NAB Show and it’s now been adopted by major customers worldwide including Comcast, NBC Sports, Turner Broadcasting, Tennis Channel, and M6 RTL Group – and has supported massive events such as the Sochi Olympics for NBC Sports. The latest customer wins include Shaw Media and Bell Media in Canada. In the U.S., Major League Baseball (MLB) and World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) have started using Adobe Primetime to deliver live and on-demand video content across desktops and XBox 360 gaming consoles.

If you’re at The NAB Show, stop by the Adobe booth (#SL3910 in the Lower South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center) to see a demo of the latest innovations in Adobe Primetime coming to a screen near you!

Revealing Next Wave of Innovation for Adobe Creative Cloud Video Apps

Editing and video content creation workflows are about to get easier, with major updates coming soon to the Creative Cloud video apps.

Today we announced plans to significantly update all the video apps in Creative Cloud including Adobe Premiere Pro CCAdobe After Effects CCAdobe Prelude CCAdobe Audition CCAdobe SpeedGrade CC, Adobe Story CC Plus, Adobe Media Encoder CC and Adobe Anywhere for video.  Adobe will reveal these exciting new updates next week at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show, the largest broadcast tradeshow in the U.S.  Our booth is #SL3910, in the South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center, April 7 – 10.

NAB 2014 Integration graphic 20140306

We developed these tools with video professionals’ entire workflow in mind and many of the new features showcase the convenience of having all of Adobe’s video apps at your fingertips with Creative Cloud. We’re thrilled that more and more filmmakers are utilizing the benefits of Creative Cloud, including two-time Academy Award-winning editor, Kirk Baxter A.C.E., choosing to cut David Fincher’s upcoming feature film “Gone Girl” exclusively with Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Twelve months ago, we promised to deliver regular updates through Creative Cloud to our customers. Over the past year, we’ve added hundreds of new and enhanced features that help video pros work faster with more streamlined workflows.  Today, we’re raising the bar with tighter levels of integration between Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC.

To find out more about today’s announcement go here.

USC Graduate Students Embrace Adobe Creative Cloud to Edit Thesis Film

Filmmaker Christopher Guerrero—soon to graduate—and Maury Shessel—already on his career path—both attended The University of Southern California (USC) School of Cinematic Arts (SCA). Both video pros have tried various software programs and suites to edit and post-produce projects and they agree: Adobe Creative Cloud with an emphasis on Adobe Premiere Pro CC for editing gives them everything they need to create a box-office hit. They decided to edit Chris’s graduate thesis film, Mike Garcia and The Cruz, using Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and shared their thoughts about their exciting work-in-progress. Norman Hollyn, USC Endowed Chair in Editing and President of the University Film and Video Association, also weighs in on the choices available to students today.

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Adobe: As graduate students from the renowned USC SCA, why did you choose Adobe Premiere Pro CC to edit Christopher’s thesis? Guerrero: My first experience editing film was at UC Santa Cruz, where I learned to edit 8-millimeter film. Like a lot of folks in the industry, I graduated to non-linear editing and learned Final Cut Pro and Avid. I became somewhat of an editing guru and digital media specialist at UC Santa Cruz. When I went to USC, I was introduced to Premiere Pro and became addicted to its ability to ingest almost any raw camera format without transcoding and its integration with other Adobe programs like After Effects and Photoshop.

Shessel: In our first conversation, when Chris inquired if I would edit his thesis, we initially decided on Premiere Pro CC due to its flexibility. We did not want to wait forever for things to be ready to edit, and we wanted to shoot on the latest high-end digital cameras, including the Sony F5 and Sony F65. Our next thought was we didn’t have the most powerful computers, so we couldn’t afford a ton of RAM to transcode and start editing. When we started really putting Premiere Pro to the test, we were pleasantly surprised. We loved that we could bring in After Effects compositions or layers from Photoshop instantly. No more checking settings or dealing with alpha channels. As the first thesis project team at USC to use Premiere Pro, we’re really trying to innovate and show what can be done with the solution.

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Adobe: Professor Hollyn, is this a trend you’re starting to see with more of your students? Hollyn: At the School of Cinematic Arts, we’re always watching what’s happening with the NLEs. We want students to learn about all of the editing solutions available to them so they have more flexibility when they graduate. We’re beginning to see more interest in using Premiere Pro for projects. We’re moving toward a situation where in a couple of years the decision of which system to work with won’t be reserved just for thesis films, it will extend down further in curriculum, even to the undergraduate level.

I meet with every group before they start shooting their thesis projects. We talk about the story, their post-production schedule, and what tools they will be using. I recently met with another group whose film involves heavy visual effects and they asked specifically about using Premiere Pro because of its strong integration with After Effects. For Chris and Maury, I know they were really interested in being able to throw multiple formats on the Premiere Pro timeline without transcoding and the Dynamic Link capability between Premiere Pro and After Effects really piqued their interest. They also wanted to be the first to edit a thesis using an Adobe workflow. I like it when our students experiment with new stuff.

Adobe: What is the thesis film about, and how long is it? Guerrero: My Master’s thesis is a comedy. Not many comedies come out of USC. That’s something Maury and I have in common. Both our theses are comedic and we both love that genre. Adding to his immense talent, this was another reason I asked him to help me with my thesis.

The film is about a punk rock IT student. He’s an anarchist who steals the Chancellor’s laptop. Right now, it is 27 minutes, but Maury and I are working on cutting it down to 15 or 16 minutes. SCA’s high profile, annual student film festival, First Look, has strict guidelines about how long films can be. We’re anticipating that it’s going to be done in December 2013 or January 2014 and we hope it will premiere at the festival.

Adobe: What have you found most useful in Adobe Premiere Pro CC? Guerrero:  I’ve been working with Premiere Pro since version CS5, and I love its ability to support a ton of high-end graphics and seamlessly incorporate effects from After Effects. With the graphics card on my computer, I can throw 10 or more effects at the timeline through Dynamic Link, and I don’t have to wait around to render anything. Everything is elegant and ready to go without re-linking files or grabbing a hard drive. The simplicity is stunning. To me, after years of jumping around between software applications and transcoding and exporting files, that’s pretty insane.

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Adobe: What was the learning curve like for you, Maury? Shessel: I was trained on Avid, and worked on it most of my life. But with Premiere Pro, I was fluent almost instantaneously. The keystrokes were slightly different, but in two to three days, my muscle memory was going for the right keys.

Adobe: Can you describe some of the best parts of this experience? Shessel: As editors, we are always looking for the best tools. After using Premiere Pro, I can’t imagine not using it again. I tell people how great of a time I’m having with editing this thesis and how easy Premiere Pro is based on other software I’ve used.

Adobe: If you had advice to give to other students, what would it be? Guerrero: Choose Premiere Pro, and forget transcoding. I know from personal experience how grueling student deadlines are. We have 16 to 18 hours of class each week on top of all our other responsibilities. Take my advice: get from shooting to cutting ASAP.

Adobe: Professor Hollyn, what do you want students to know about the industry when they graduate? Hollyn: One of the best things we can do for our students is to try to future proof them. This doesn’t mean teaching them every editing program. We try to provide them with knowledge about not just what’s happening in 2013 but what may be happening in 2017. Of course, we can’t predict the future, but we can make sure they learn how to continue growing their skills. There will always be new technologies, distribution channels, and formats. We want students to be able to look for these changes, adapt, and even take advantage of the opportunities that these changes present.

Adobe: Maury, Christopher, what do you both foresee in the future? Guerrero: There’s an idea people have been throwing around for years, and that’s the democratization of filmmaking. There’s some truth in that. Now everyone has the tools. However, not everyone has the knowledge and creative alchemy and talent to bring all these elements—video, photos, and visual effects—together in a way that intrigues and excites audiences. Today and in the future, smaller teams will be able to create drastically higher quality productions through ingenuity and technologies. Ultimately, filmmaking is about problem solving. Adobe is providing far more tools to solve more problems, much faster. And that helps us create better, more gripping films with fewer resources.

Shessel: I think Premiere Pro is not just a tool, it’s more of an enabler of style, and I’m a worshipper of style, almost to a fault. Over the decades, distinct styles have emerged based on whether people edit on a Moviola or on film, or using non-linear editing tools.  Now, with the ease of integration among Creative Cloud components, including After Effects, Illustrator, and Photoshop, I think a new style may emerge as creative barriers are knocked down. So I’m watching closely.

Learn more about the video apps and services in Adobe Creative Cloud.

Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Available Now: 150+ Innovations in Our Creative Cloud Video Tools

CC VideoThe Creative Cloud team has rolled out significant updates (150+ innovations) in Adobe Premiere® Pro CC, Adobe After Effects® CC, Adobe SpeedGrade™ CC, Adobe Prelude™ CC, Adobe Media Encoder CC, Adobe Story CC Plus, Adobe Anywhere® for video including two new iPad apps; the Prelude CC Live Logger app, which enables users to log notes, events, and other data on their iPad while shooting and then sync metadata to footage via Creative Cloud for faster editing and a new Adobe Anywhere iPad app that lets editors browse shared productions and play media and sequences from the Adobe Anywhere Server on their iPads.

There was a lot of buzz when these innovations were previewed last month at the International Broadcasting Conference (IBC) and we’re looking forward to seeing what you create. For more details about today’s news, get the scoop on the Creative Layer blog. For more information on Adobe Creative Cloud, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe SpeedGrade CC, Adobe Prelude CC, Adobe Media Encoder CC, Adobe Story CC Plus and other tools available in Adobe Creative Cloud, visit www.adobe.com/products/creativecloud.html.

Adobe, Behance & 99u

When Adobe bought Behance in December 2012, some folks – ok the lily-livered naysayers that commentate negatively on every tech announcement, no matter who the company – predicted doom and gloom for the world’s leading social community for creatives. Adobe would come in and stamp a big red “A” over a vibrant space where creatives showcased their work and looked for inspiration from their peers. It would soon become a bland corporate wasteland or some such. Somehow this didn’t happen.

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I’m not sure, during our due diligence (I’m guessing “yes” since I know our legal team) if we dug deep into Behance’s 99u conference but 10 months after Behance became part of the Adobe family, all indications are that the community and conference Behance created is going from strength to strength. Today 99u held the first day of a sold-out “Pop-up School” in NYC that attracted a few hundred creatives. This was a new initiative. The theme of day one was career development and illuminating talks from Behance founder Scott Belsky and Columbia University’s Heidi Grant Halvorson kicked things off.

Creatives often don’t think about managing their careers and Scott urged everyone to take an inventory on what could make them, their companies, their products and services stand apart from the competition. Standing apart means admitting to yourself what you are bad at and concentrating on where you can excel. However, it’s not enough to stand apart because as soon as you do, the competition will follow. So constant iteration and refinement is needed.

Heidi followed with some big thinking on motivation. Being good at something is bad thing! The important mind trick is to want to get better. If you believe you’re good at something, it’s a downward spiral because you are always in competition with others to be the best and if someone doesn’t like your work, it is a personal attack on your own self-worth. And that can be a dark space. If you change your mindset to want to “get better” at something, in your work or in your personal life, then suddenly set backs are learning experiences and the only person you should judge yourself against is your past self. Despite, or because of your experiences, am I a better designer, writer, manager than I was a year ago? That’s the real test. I’m simplifying but you get the picture.

A lot of this thinking is captured in the new 99u book, Maximize Your Potential. And if this all sounds a bit cultish….I can assure you it wasn’t.  :-)

99u also saw our Project Mighty and Napoleon product folks show off their wares during the “playground” sessions and their wee booth was packed with interested parties.

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The Adobe comms team was in NYC with our Experience Design (XD) friends to give a sneak peek of Mighty & Napoleon to media and it was an overwhelmingly positive response. I think we may have a hardware hit on our hands!

Thank You for Joining Us on this Journey

When we launched Creative Cloud, we shared our vision to build a platform for creativity that removes friction from the creative process and makes it more productive and connected, allowing you to do your best work.

Today we announced an important milestone – over one million premium members worldwide have joined Creative Cloud. To all of you – as well as the millions of other creatives who are part of our extended network through Behance, Typekit, Kuler or through a free Creative Cloud membership – we would like to say thank you! You inspire us every day through your creations, and we’re thrilled to be part of such a vibrant creative community.

A Broader Canvas for Innovation
Embracing the cloud has given us the ability to think differently about our role in the creative world, and gives us a much broader canvas for innovation. New technologies such as cloud, social, and mobile have changed the creative landscape dramatically, and we are fully embracing the opportunity this gives us all.

Our product teams have been very busy since we launched Creative Cloud. We’ve added hundreds of new features across all our major products, added sophisticated cross-device collaboration and publishing capabilities; and integrated Behance, the world’s leading online creative community where members can showcase work, get feedback on projects and gain global exposure.  And today, I’m happy to announce the immediate availability of the Lightroom 5.2 update and the new Photoshop Photography Program, a special offer for our loyal photography customers.

Projects Mighty (pen), Napoleon (ruler) and Parallel (app) for the iPad

Projects Mighty (pen), Napoleon (ruler) and Parallel (app) for the iPad

But we’re just getting started. Creative cloud is still in its infancy and we have a lot more to do.  And thanks in part to your feedback, the year ahead should be fun and exciting as we continue to execute on the vision we laid out at MAX – to build a creative platform with fully integrated software, services and hardware.  And as a great example of that, Adobe is moving our cloud pen, Project Mighty, and our digital ruler, Project Napoleon, from a technology exploration to planned products. If you saw our exploration demo at MAX, you already know that this is part of our commitment to making the art of creation easier, wherever and whenever you feel inspired.

So again – thank you all for making the last year truly remarkable.  Together we’ve taken Creative Cloud from an idea to more than a million premium members in just over a year.  We are honored that you’ve joined us on this journey and are working very hard to get innovative ideas in your hands faster than ever before.  To those of you who have not yet joined Creative Cloud and are still considering if it is right for you, I hope you will join us at one of our upcoming Create Now World Tour events. We have a lot to share and hope to see you there.

David

Twitter: @dwadhwani

Get Schooled at the 99U Pop-Up School in NYC

99U Pop-up School in NYC

For anyone who truly wants to make ideas happen, ongoing learning is essential. As philosopher Eric Hoffer said, “In a time of drastic change, it is the learners who inherit the future.” That’s why we’re launching an incredible new event in New York this Fall: The first 99U Pop-Up School, which will take place this September 18-20th in New York.

Just in time for back to school, we’re curating a killer program around three skill sets that should be in every creative’s arsenal: career development, entrepreneurship, and brand + digital strategy. Each day will feature an incredible lineup of talks and master classes from creative visionaries like Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, Adobe’s own Scott Belsky, Facebook designer Ben Barry, bestselling author & entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk, and former Apple VP Marketing Allison Johnson, among others.

But it’s not just about listening, it’s also about getting hands-on with learning. To achieve this, we’re building out an incredible interactive space called the Playground that will feature a hand-crafted lineup of mentorship sessions, skill-building booths, interactive workshops, and creative tool demos with partners like R/GA, Tattly, Red Antler, XFund, Pantone, and many more.

Find out more about the event here, and take advantage of a special offer for Adobe friends and family. Register with this promo code, “adobeschool99code” to get 30% the regular ticket price. Offer ends Wednesday, 9/4, so register now.

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