Results tagged “AYV”

Hard Work Pays Off

Ceballos_1st post_photoAlvaro Ceballos is an AYV Scholarships recipient from New York City. He participated in AYV at Urban Arts Partnership. Alvaro is currently studying Film at the Pratt Institute.

When I left the Dominican Republic I was a junior in high school, very close to starting college. Moving to the United States without knowing English pushed back all my dreams. I needed to start from zero as a freshman in high school again. At first I thought that I would never make it to college, but after all the sacrifices my family and I made, going to college became my priority. I went to ELLIS Preparatory Academy, a school dedicated to serving the academic and social needs of recently arrived youth like myself. Its mission is to assist its international population of students in developing their linguistic, intellectual, cultural and collaborative abilities, so that they may become part of this new culture.

From my second year until my senior year at ELLIS, I was required to do internships. It was at this point in my life when I discovered my passion for art. I interned at the Bronx Museum of the Arts (teen council), the National Museum of the American Indian, Lehman College Art Gallery, Barbara’s Flowers, and Scratch DJ Academy. My final internship was with the Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy at Urban Arts Partnerships. All of these internships helped me a lot, not only academically and socially, but also artistically. Now I am a full-time student at the Pratt Institute with the dream of becoming a film director.

The Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy helped me decide on my college career. Before going to the Academy in early senior year, I was undecided on my major. After interning at the Academy, I realized that film was something that I want to do for the rest of my life as a professional career.  Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy was the only place where I took film classes. I came to the Pratt Institute with knowledge of using Adobe Premiere, and it really helped me for my early assignments in my digital cinema class.

Adjustments in Higher Education

Student Author: Eva Miller

Eva Miller is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Hayward, California. She participated in AYV at Tennyson High School in Hayward. Eva is currently studying Sociology and Communications at California State University, East Bay.

I am more than half way through my first quarter in college. And let me say, it has been an adjustment. For instance, parking is a nightmare, which all I have to compare it to is my high school, where few students drove. Also, in a normal week, I go to school three days out of seven. If you’re not really thinking how great this is, let me do it for you: I do not go to school more than I go to school. I am lucky for this because transitioning has (and I will say it again) been an adjustment.

Miller_1st post_photoAt my college, Cal State East Bay, they require all freshmen to be in a learning community, called clusters. My cluster is named Beats; I thought this would help when producing sound tracks and audio files for my films. A main class of the cluster is Audio Production. I am currently collaborating with a couple of my peers to create a song using audio software. The writing process amuses me as it is required. The song is completely satire and it has been a lot of fun putting it together. My group and I are almost done. Our other classmates have created hype about our song. I am eager to share it with my class.

As my college is in the same community as my home, it has not been hard staying connected with my community, my family, and my friends. I still volunteer and keep in contact with my AYV program (writing this blog post is reminding me to do that more).  Recently, I found out a local community center has an AYV program, and I am aggressively thinking about offering my hands and ideas. I wish I could say I have done more, but as I said before starting college has been an adjustment. And I like to think that once this quarter is over, I will be doing more projects. For example, my cousin has a band, and I will be making music videos for them. I will also be reaching out to my AYV site that has given me so much.

Until next time…

Kevin in the Making

Student Author – Kevin Bernardez

Kevin Bernardez is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Boston, Massachusetts. He participated in AYV at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School. Kevin is currently attending Fitchburg State University in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.

Hello everyone, my name is Kevin Bernardez, and I am so thrilled to introduce myself as an Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipient. I have to say that it has truly been a wonderful journey for me from the first day of high school until my first day in college. But wait, my journey does not end here. I still have fuel in my tank that has driven me to become a phenomenal student.

I graduated from Madison Park Technical Vocational High School, located in Roxbury, Massachusetts and I am currently enrolled at Fitchburg State University as a pre-major (undecided). Next semester I would love to major in in Film and Video because that is where my heart is, and that is what I’m most passionate about.

I love everything about film, from the different types of cameras to the way people act in scenes. I am not a very good actor, but with experience, I will be. I am very creative behind the scenes with directing, filming shots, and editing the piece. I have also expanded my horizons by creating animations as well.

I became interested in filmmaking when I was in 7th grade. At the time, my siblings and I created our own dance group called the H Star Crew and for a couple years, we had performed at numerous of places around Boston. In order to gain exposure for ourselves, we decided to produce videos and post them on YouTube. None of my siblings knew how to put clips together so I decided to give it a try, then I gradually learned how to edit videos on my own.

While still in middle school, I also produced music videos with an underground Reggae musician from Boston, which has helped gain exposure for his music. In my spare time, I would learn new aspects of video such as creating special effects. I’ve produced two videos using Adobe After Effects. In one video, I animated bringing the world, lighting, and a Super Mario fireball into my hands as I was sitting at my kitchen table. In another video, I cloned myself dancing, as if I was battling against myself.

As a student at Madison Park, I knew that I was going to experience the cutting edge of television and film production. Being a part of the Adobe Youth Voices program has allowed me to grow potential within myself as an artist. I learned things such as making sure you don’t use copy written music, brand, material and so forth. As an AYV alumni and a recipient of the AYV Scholarship, to have the opportunity to socialize with other Adobe Youth Voices students has opened up doors to network with other artists who has the same interest as me and to build on my craft. The only direction to go from here is forward.  

 

Is Engineering Interesting?

Randhir Singh is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Noida, India. He participated in AYV at Noida Public School. Randhir is currently studying Civil Engineering at National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra in Kurukshetra, India.

I know the Theory of Relativity and Einstein’s equations boggles even those who have chosen engineering as their career, but I made a bet that when it comes to the practical sessions and workshops, engineering would become really interesting. And this is what I found out. Want to see how? Come…

randhir singh

AYV Scholar, Randhir Singh, at work

Workshops generally give us a gist of practical information and exposure to every part of a job we do in Engineering. Here “job” is not the usual term we use in our day to day lives but refers to anything we create in workshops and during practical sessions. In my case too I got this exposure and tried my hand on various tools like the lathe machine, bench vice, and welding set to create jobs related to machine, fitting, welding, foundry etc.

Let me explain to you how interesting these shops were and what I learned from them, how I tackle my problem and the overall workshop experience and problems.

 

Welding Shoprandhir singh at work

Many of us have never even held a welder in our hands and this too was my case. I had no past experience of welding. But our instructor made it really easy for us. The main problem was that you are not supposed to look at the light coming out of it. Thank God we had our goggles and masks. But it was not enough, the Iron sheet attracted the welder many times. This was the most irritating part, but after three classes I finally got it.

 

randhir singh at work2Fitting Shop

This was probably the toughest and most laborious workshop for me. Transforming a circular hole created in a thick iron piece by using triangular files, round files, flat files etc. Rubbing, rubbing and rubbing until I got the perfect shape. No matter how much I perspired, it was still the most interesting job for me.

 

Foundry Shop

randhir singh at work3This was the easiest and dirtiest job we did and it reminded me of my childhood when I used to play with dirt. Wow… in this job we were taught to make a molding of a pattern using rectangular frame and foundry tools.

I still am learning techniques to improve my expertise in each job, the only bad thing is that this class is only once in a week.

But, guys, engineering is really interesting, and if you are keen to find logic behind every day to day happening, then you should surely adopt it as your future. Last but not the least, thanks to Adobe Youth Voices for this scholarship, which made it possible for me to start my college degree in engineering this year and learn such amazing and creative things here.

Thanks a lot!!!

 

Fractals: An Infinite Fascination

Student author: Karishma Changlani

Karishma Changlani is an AYV Scholarships recipient from Mumbai, India. She participated in Adobe Youth Voices at CLT India Bangalore. Karishma is studying Computer Science at Drexel University in Philadelphia, where she is part of the Honors Program.

 

In March 2013, I stumbled upon a beautiful artwork: Joy by Eli Vokounova.

 photo 1

I couldn’t quite describe what I felt. It was amazement filled with “Joy.” I wanted to learn to make others feel this way with my work. So I started following this amazing artist on deviant art and came across the world of “Fractal Art”.

This medium of art helped me realize how imagination and a few techniques make someone create something completely out of this world. And how much technology can help us achieve this.

Being a Computer Science major this astounded me. I felt more in love with the human mind and its inventions.

Now, you must be wondering what is Fractal Art?

First you need to understand what fractal geometry is:

Fractal Geometry: “The geometric characterization of the simplest fractals is self-similarity: the shape is made of smaller copies of itself. The copies are similar to the whole: same shape but different size.”

Basically a fractal geometric figure is one that repeats in itself indefinitely. This video by Tara Roys gives a simple explanation of the same:

Moreover, you can see in the following images the shape (not color) repeats itself indefinitely in itself:

 

Alive by Johanna

 

Friday Night by Tatyana Zabanova

In turn, fractal art is art created using this type of geometry.  There are many types of fractal art including the famous Mandelbrot Set.

But what are the things that makes fractal art so unique is:

  1. The elegant algorithm that goes into making one.
  2. Digital medium making fractal art so fascinating.
  3. The unlimited possibilities
  4. Etc.

What I love the most is how all one needs is a computer with appropriate fractal interpreter and imagination.  In fact one could possibly create a fractal in Adobe Photoshop using Fractus and Buddhabrot.

I have made fractal art a very important part of my creative life. I intend to work on a creative project that would not only educate people about the fractal geometry but also help me express myself and my opinions in a more artistic way.

Some of my own fractal works are:

 photo4

Frozen Vines

 

Autumn Sky

 

Moonlit Nature

To check out more of me go to: http://doodler0305.deviantart.com/

Creativity In and Out of the Classroom with Adobe Youth Voices

We believe that everyone has the power to create change – including (and especially) our youth. What everyone does not have, however, are the resources they need to bring their ideas to life.

At Adobe Youth Voices (AYV), we want to change that. We want to ignite creative confidence in youth by giving them the tools they need to create compelling visual stories that move people to take action in their communities. In our evolving world of media, the use of graphics, photographs and films is pervasive. AYV youth are learning the skills they need to solve for the issues they face in their communities today and eventually in the workplace as well.

2013 AYV Awards winning graphics

2013 AYV Awards winning graphics

Helping these students and seeing them grow is what inspires me to come to work every day. Amanda Tomchick fromSeattle, WA believes that the program changed her life. Alumni Zach James is now an intern with Butchershop Pro in San Francisco after working with their team at AYV Summit last year. And Kasiem Aboti Walters says that he now has the confidence he needs to perform his art in front of others.

This is exactly the type of news I love to hear, but they represent just 3 of the 33,500 students that participated in 2013. And it doesn’t stop there – more youth are submitting photo essays, music videos, and other forms of visual storytelling this year as part of the AYV Awards. Their work is amazing – take a look at some of it here and learn how to get involved.

AYV educator Claire Beach says it best in the video below: “These projects change the way [students] think about media and empower them to be better global citizens. I’m able to help youth tell visual stories about how they would solve real-world issues and prepare them for their creative future.”

We’re so inspired by what these students have already accomplished and can’t wait to see what they come up with this year. To the Amandas, Zachs, and Kasiems of the world – keep at it. We’re behind you all the way.

The Person That Works The Hardest Wins

GraceKimStudent Author: Grace Kim

Grace Kim is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She participated in AYV at Lester B. Pearson Collegiate Institute. Grace is currently attending the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto and majoring in Graphic Design.

 

This was the theme for the first assignment of my university career.  The project was for my “Colour in Context” class, where we had to create a t-shirt design with this phrase on it.  Everybody in the class interpreted this project in different ways and everybody’s project had a different look and feel – the only common thread was the phrase “the person that works the hardest wins.”

At Ontario College of Arts and Design University (OCADU), we all come from different places with different skills and experiences under our belt.  But the few things we do have in common is our love and passion for art and design, our goals and dreams of being able to pursue what we love and to be successful at it, and the hard work and dedication we put in in order to achieve those goals and dreams.

It was no different for me.  Although I was nervous about going to university and starting a new stage in my life, I was very excited as well.  I couldn’t wait to put myself in an environment where I could focus solely on what I wanted to do – which was to study and pursue design – and to have people around me who would teach, encourage, and inspire me.   In the two months that I have been attending OCADU, I have met so many amazing people and have learned so much from them as well as from my professors.  But most importantly, I have been learning more and more about myself each and every day – not only as a person, but also as a designer.  Even though I am in the graphic design program and I have been planning on pursuing graphic design for the past two years, I have started to want to learn different things, try different mediums and different types of design.  The variety of courses that I take give me a chance to do so, and even if I am not good at it at first, when I see the amazing things that other people can do, it inspires me and makes me want to challenge myself to go outside of my comfort zone and to just do it.  At this point in my life, I am not exactly sure of what I want to do, but I keep pushing myself and exploring all the different options and opportunities there are for me.

And most importantly, I always work hard and give my best effort.  To have a project that revolves around the theme of working hard as the first project of my university career has really helped to push me in the right direction and give me something to fall back on in times of stress and worry.  We are all sailing in this ocean called life, trying to find our destination even though we don’t know where it is.  If we give up, we’ll never find it.  But if we work hard and give our best, we will be able to find it even after all the twists and turns.  We may not “win” or get the outcome or grades we would have liked, but hard work never goes unrewarded — whether it’s recognition, a job, a scholarship, or even your own satisfaction, hard work will always bear fruit.  We just have to be patient, and wait for when it is our time to reach our destination.

Kim_1st post_photo2

 

Inspiration in Animation

Student Author: Marné Pool

Marné Pool is an AYV Scholarships recipient from San Jose, California. She participated in AYV at Willow Glen High School in San Jose. Marné is currently studying Digital Art and Animation at Cogswell Polytechnical College in Sunnyvale, California.

This semester I am taking my first animation class! Since I want to be an animator, I was really excited to finally learn about it. The class is focused on 2D animation so we use traditional techniques to create short animations.

When I first started, I had a vague idea of how the process worked. It was quite difficult at first! There were many techniques, like how to roll or flip the paper, which took a bit of time to get the hang of.

We started with a simple ball bounce to learn the most basic concepts and from there we worked up to more complicated assignments. I realized that one of the most important things to understand is timing. The timing makes an animation believable, which helps the audience connect to the story you are trying to tell. If the timing is off, the viewer will become distanced from the piece and lose interest.

Although I would like to do 3-D animation, knowing the techniques of 2D will help me a lot — all the same principles must be applied for a successful animation.

After the ball drop, we did all the standard tests like a leaf falling, flour sack drop, water splash and a brick drop. Each object reacts differently when dropped, some are hard and rigid, while others are smoother and organic.  Each assignment required that we shoot our own reference — it’s a very hands on kind of thing! These assignments take a lot of time and effort to get the right feel. After lots of hours and thick stacks of paper, we have a few seconds of animation finished!

After working on objects, we moved on to characters. Achieving a smooth, believable character walk took a few attempts, but I did find it more natural animating a human, since I’m more familiar with the way people move.

For our final project, we are creating 15–30 second shorts involving one character interacting with a 2 liter soda bottle. We must display a change in emotion as they interact with the bottle. It has to be an obvious difference from the beginning to the end of the sequence. This will require that I create storyboards, an animatic, and finally, the many passes of the actual animations.

Although the work can be tedious, this class is very inspiring. I look at the animated movies from my childhood with a new appreciation. I now understand the extent of the work that went into each scene. All the subtleties of the characters stand out to me. I love all the little details in the animation that give the characters a connection to the audience.  These otherwise cold, flat pictures come alive and tell beautiful heartwarming stories. I aspire to create the same kind of magic in my own work someday.

Introducing The Adobe Youth Voices Scholars Blog Series

Earlier this year, 25 highly talented Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) students were selected to receive scholarships to help them pursue higher education in a creative field. We are pleased to announce that the first group of scholarship recipients will be contributing blog posts sharing their experiences in post-secondary school and updating us on their creative projects. We hope these blogs will inspire current AYV students who dream about starting a creative career!

2013-2014 AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV students entering their first or second year of post-secondary school during the 2014-15 academic year are encouraged to apply for the scholarship here. Applications are being accepted until March 3, 2014.

The AYV Scholarships program is fully funded by Adobe and administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE), an independent not-for-profit founded in 1919. IIE is among the world’s largest and most experienced international education and training organizations.

Please join us in congratulating the Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipients and check back for their blog posts!

A Year in Review: Adobe Corporate Responsibility in 2013

From actively engaging our employees, to driving operations efficiencies, to positively impacting communities, we believe in the power of creativity to inspire positive change. We’re rounding out the end of the year with a look back on some of our key corporate responsibility achievements in 2013.

Here are some of our favorites:

  • For the first time, 100% of the waste from our San Jose headquarters was diverted from the landfill – the equivalent of almost 215 garbage trucks.* We also produced 27% of our San Jose energy onsite with renewable electricity, effectively using our headquarters as a power plant and reducing our dependency on the grid.
  • 70% of our global office space in now LEED certified, and we’ve officially taken on the USGBC Building Health Challenge – a pledge to promote health and wellness and to catalyze industry change in building healthy places. Next year, we’ll continue to work towards our goal of achieving Net Zero status at each of our owned facilities in North America by 2015.
  • For the second year in a row, we were able to distribute 73% of our software electronically in an effort to reduce the need for packaging. For the minimal amount of software we do distribute in physical form, we hope to reduce the amount of packaging per product unit by 80% next year, double the target we achieved in 2011.
  • $59 million in product donations, $13 million in cash charitable contributions, and thousands of hours of volunteer work resulted in an interactive light installation at the Children’s Creativity Museum, a new playground for children in Palo Alto, and a gardening day in our offices, just to name a few.
  • We reached 25% more youth as a part of our Adobe Youth Voices program this year, culminating in the AYV Awards and a week-long gathering of young people and educators from around the world.

We’ve been working steadily towards these accomplishments for years. We’re not stopping now – we’re going to keep creating change in the years to coming, causing this ripple effect to continue to spread.

Thank you to our customers, employees, and partners for helping us create a more sustainable future. While 2013 was a great year, we’re confident that we can make an even bigger impact in 2014.

*Source: Calculations are based on United States Environmental Protection Agency document, Waste Transfer Stations: A Manual for Decision-Making.  

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