Results tagged “Flash Player 10.1”

Flash Player 10.1 Now at 85% Penetration

The December 2010 Flash Player penetration study is in:

- 85.3% of people in mature markets are using the current version, Flash Player 10.1
- 87.4% in US/Canada and 86.2% in Europe
- 82.4% in emerging markets

The September 2010 Flash Player 10.1 penetration numbers broke all the previous rate records with 74% mature market penetration in just 3 months. The December 2010 study validates those statistics: as FP 10.1 penetration in mature markets is now over 85% and over 82% in emerging markets. At this rate, Flash Player 10.1 is expected to be at over 90% penetration before summer.

Visit the Flash Player team blog for more details on why we perform the studies, how they are completed, and why they are so important to developers.

FTC Issues Preliminary Privacy Report

This week, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a preliminary staff report that proposes a framework to balance the privacy interests of consumers with innovation to develop beneficial products and services.

Adobe would support and participate in any industry initiative to foster clear, meaningful, and persistent choice regarding online tracking for purposes that are not obvious in context or commonly accepted, as described in the FTC report. This includes the “tracking” of user preferences by third parties for advertising purposes using local storage capabilities (such as Flash Local Shared Objects, often referred to as “Flash cookies” in the public and confused with Web browser cookies), which were not designed for this purpose. Adobe has repeatedly stated publicly that we condemn such practices because they clearly circumvent the user’s expressed choice. The public comment Adobe submitted in preparation for the FTC’s second privacy roundtable discussion, which took place on January 28, 2010, reflects our position.

Adobe recently commissioned a study to follow up on the findings about misuses of Flash Player local storage that were detailed in a research paper released by the University of California at Berkeley in 2009. The new study, performed by a reputable university and a non-profit privacy organization, is designed to determine how prevalent the use of Flash Player local storage to respawn browser cookies is in light of all the publicity on this topic over the last year. Results from the study are promising and show that respawning is negligible on the Web today. The study is expected to be released before the end of the year.

Adobe recognizes the importance of protecting user privacy and continuously works on new ways to help ensure the consumer’s right to privacy. As an example, Flash Player 10.1, released in June 2010, supports the private browsing mode found in many browsers, which allows users to browse the Web without storing any browsing history on the user’s computer, including local storage data. Among other improvements, Adobe is also working with the browser developers to better coordinate local storage management with browser privacy management settings. Today, Google Chrome already provides access to Flash Player local storage settings from within the browser’s privacy controls. Adobe anticipates that future versions of Google Chrome and other browsers will include the ability for users to view and clear their local storage data directly through the browser privacy management interface.

MeMe Jacobs Rasmussen
Chief Privacy Officer
Adobe Systems Incorporated

Department of Defense delivers mission-critical solutions with Flash Platform

In a recent conversation, Carl Houghton, the vice president of strategic initiatives at ISS told us that the Adobe Flash Platform is an essential component of his company’s ability to quickly develop powerful applications that help the U.S. military coordinate critical information on the battlefield, in war rooms, and in Congress.


Houghton says that the advanced development tools in the Adobe software helped cut RIA development time by six months. The RIAs help military leaders securely share information across a variety of platforms and devices, and the reliable online and offline access to information enhances agencies’ ability to collaborate efficiently and effectively. Most importantly, the applications bring a new level of engagement with information with advanced data visualization, which helps users better understand the information they’re viewing and make better, more strategic decisions. Click here for more.

Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert’s Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear – delivered online and device in Flash

On Saturday Oct. 30 from 12:00-3:00pm ET Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert and fans from across the country of Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” and “The Colbert Report” will gather on the National Mall in Washington DC for the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear, an event Stewart says is “for the people who’ve been too busy to go to rallies — not so much the Silent Majority as the Busy Majority.”

Interested in tuning in, but can’t make it to the National Mall? The Rally and March will be streamed live on Comedy Central using the Adobe Flash Platform. Viewers can also catch the action live on their Android 2.2 “froyo” enabled device, using Flash Player 10.1.

Learn more about live streaming with the Flash Platform here and Flash Player 10.1 for Android here.

Great News for Developers

Apple’s announcement today that it has lifted restrictions on its third-party developer guidelines has direct implications for Adobe’s Packager for iPhone, a feature in the Flash Professional CS5 authoring tool. This feature was created to enable Flash developers to quickly and easily deliver applications for iOS devices. The feature is available for developers to use today in Flash Professional CS5, and we will now resume development work on this feature for future releases.

This is great news for developers and we’re hearing from our developer community that Packager apps are already being approved for the App Store. We do want to point out that Apple’s restriction on Flash content running in the browser on iOS devices remains in place.

Adobe will continue to work to bring full web browsing with Flash Player 10.1 as well as standalone applications on AIR to a broad range of devices, working with key industry partners including Google, HTC, Microsoft, Motorola, Nokia, Palm/HP, RIM, Samsung and others.

Droid 2, HTC Evo, HTC Desire, & more getting Flash Player 10.1

Smartphones like the HTC Evo and the HTC Desire have started to receive Flash Player 10.1 as part of the Android 2.2 “Froyo” update.  And, today, Motorola and Verizon announced the new Droid 2.  It’s great to see one of the first smartphones to come pre-installed with the completely redesigned Flash Player 10.1.  Users can experience the full web with millions of web sites the way they were meant to be seen.  Flash Player 10.1 on the Droid 2 is hardware accelerated and gives users seamless access to rich apps and other Flash content inside the browser like games, animations, rich Internet apps, e-commerce, music, video, audio, and much more.  Check out droiddoes.com for more information and watch the demo video below of Flash running on the Droid 2.  Many more smartphones like the HTC Incredible, the Samsung Galaxy S, Motorola Milestone, Droid X and others will support Flash Player 10.1 in the following weeks.  We’ll keep you posted.

Flash Player 10.1 for Mobile Available

Flash Player 10.1 for Mobile is here! Fully redesigned with new performance and mobile-specific functionality, mobile users will now be able to experience the full web — games, animations, RIAs, data visualizations, music, video, audio and more.

Visit the Flash Platform blog for a rundown of the news, partners in support – including links to their communications, top new features, and the latest video demos.

Flash Platform News from Google I/O

As Paul Betlem, Sr. Director, Flash Player Engineering wrote on the Player team blog, “today represents an exciting milestone for the Flash Platform” as we move forward with three major developments:

1. The official launch of the public beta release of Flash Player 10.1 on Android-based devices. Read about the release

2. A prerelease program for developers to start building apps on AIR for Android. Learn more and sign up

3. Flash Player 10.1 will be on Google TV. Read about the news and watch it in action

There has been strong developer enthusiasm around Flash Player and AIR for Android devices, and this is just the beginning – in the months ahead we’ll see many of our Open Screen Project partners start launching new devices with Flash technology. As designers and developers start digging into the newest tools, such as Flash Builder and Flash Professional CS5, we’re going to see a new wave of rich content and apps across desktops, mobile phones, televisions, and other consumer electronics. We can’t wait to see all the innovations ahead!

Adobe Announcements at Mobile World Congress 2010

Today at the 2010 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, Adobe made several exciting announcements that further the company’s leadership role in bringing a richer, more immersive user experience to mobile devices.

Adobe unveiled AIR on mobile devices and announced that a beta of Flash Player 10.1 was made available to content providers and mobile developers worldwide. Adobe AIR enables developers to build cross-platform, standalone applications and deliver them through app stores, mobile marketplaces, adobe.com and other ways. General availability of AIR for Android is expected in 2010. Additional platforms including BlackBerry are expected to be supported in the future.

Adobe is also confirming that the full Flash Player (Flash Player 10.1) is on track for general availability in the first half of 2010. If you’re attending the show, drop by the Adobe booth (Stand 1D45 in Hall 1) to talk to Adobe experts and see Flash Player 10.1 running on Android, Palm WebOS and other platforms and devices. As part of the announcement Adobe also shared that the Open Screen Project has grown to close to 70 partners, all working to bring uncompromised Web browsing to smartphones, tablets, smartbooks, netbooks and other consumer electronics.

On the partnership front, Adobe has joined the LiMo Foundation, allowing developers to bring Flash to LiMo devices. Current members of LiMo include some of the largest operators and OEMs in the industry, including LG, NEC, NTT DOCOMO, Orange, Panasonic, Samsung, SK Telecom, Telefonica, Vodafone, and Verizon Wireless. A full description of LiMo can be found here.

Open Access to Content and Applications

Some have been surprised at the lack of inclusion of Flash Player on a recent magical device.

Ironically, Flash was originally designed for pen computing tablets, about 15 years before that market was ready to take off. Flash exists now only due to its finding an alternate route in its use — first filling a niche on the Web by enabling low-bandwidth vector graphics in the early days and then rapidly adding new capabilities over the past decade. That includes bringing animation, streaming audio, rich interactivity, arbitrary fonts, two-way audio/video communication, local storage, and enabling the video revolution on the Web.

By augmenting the capabilities of HTML, Flash has been incredibly successful in its adoption, with over 85% of the top web sites containing Flash content and Flash running on over 98% of computers on the Web. It is used for the majority of casual games, video, and animation on the Web and familiar brands like Nike, Hulu, BBC, Major League Baseball, and more rely on Flash to deliver the most compelling experiences to over a billion people.

Now we are at an important crux for the future of Flash. A wide variety of devices beyond personal computers are arriving, many of which will be used to browse the Web, making it increasingly challenging to deliver what creators and users of content and applications have come to expect of Flash on personal computers — seamless, consistent and rich experiences. The Flash engineering team has taken this on with a major overhaul of the mainstream Flash Player for a variety of devices.

We are now on the verge of delivering Flash Player 10.1 for smartphones with all but one of the top manufacturers. This includes Google’s Android, RIM’s Blackberry, Nokia, Palm Pre and many others across form factors including not only smartphones but also tablets, netbooks, and internet-connected TVs. Flash in the browser provides a competitive advantage to these devices because it will enable their customers to browse the whole Web. This is being accomplished via the Open Screen Project, where we are working with over 50 partners to make this a reality across a wide array of devices. For example, the recent Nexus One from Google will rock with a great experience in the browser with Flash Player 10.1.

So, what about Flash running on Apple devices? We have shown that Flash technology is starting to work on these devices today by enabling standalone applications for the iPhone to be built on Flash. In fact, some of these apps are already available in the Apple App Store such as FickleBlox and Chroma Circuit. This same solution will work on the iPad as well. We are ready to enable Flash in the browser on these devices if and when Apple chooses to allow that for its users, but to date we have not had the required cooperation from Apple to make this happen.

Longer term, some point to HTML as eventually supplanting the need for Flash, particularly with the more recent developments coming in HTML with version 5. I don’t see this as one replacing the other, certainly not today nor even in the foreseeable future.

Adobe supports HTML and its evolution and we look forward to adding more capabilities to our software around HTML as it evolves. If HTML could reliably do everything Flash does that would certainly save us a lot of effort, but that does not appear to be coming to pass. Even in the case of video, where Flash is enabling over 75% of video on the Web today, the coming HTML video implementations cannot agree on a common format across browsers, so users and content creators would be thrown back to the dark ages of video on the Web with incompatibility issues.

The productivity and expressiveness of Flash remain advantages for the Web community even as HTML advances. The Flash team will drive innovation over the coming years as they have over the past decade to enable experiences that aren’t otherwise possible. With the ability to update the majority of Web clients in less than a year, Flash can make this innovation available to our customers much more quickly than HTML across a variety of browsers.

Our mission at Adobe is to revolutionize how people engage with ideas and information, and we focus daily on how to best empower designers and developers to express themselves most fully and creatively. To have the greatest creative control combined with the most productive tools and broadest ability to deploy their content and applications. We support whatever technologies and formats that best enable our customers to accomplish these goals, and work to drive technology forward where there are gaps that we can fill. The blend of Flash and HTML are best together, enabling anyone to make pragmatic decisions to use these for their strengths to make the best experiences on the Web.

Engaging with ideas and information also means ensuring there is an open ecosystem and freedom to view and interact with the content and applications a user chooses. This model of open access has proven to be more effective in the long term than a walled approach, where a manufacturer tries to determine what users are able to see or approves and disapproves individual content and applications. We strongly believe the Web should remain an open environment with consistent access to content and applications regardless of your viewing device.

We are continuing to focus on enabling our customers to do their best work, and helping them reach people effectively and reliably around the world across operating systems, browsers, and a variety of devices.

Update: I’ve responded as well in the comments below.

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