Results tagged “gaming”

Congratulations to San Jose/Silicon Valley Students!

CA Globeys - AdobeI wanted to share some exciting news around our continuous work with Globaloria, a national program that teaches kids how to design and program their own STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) digital games. I had a chance, along with Johann Zimmern, our worldwide education program manager, to honor several San Jose Bay Area students at the 2nd Annual Silicon Valley Globey Awards Ceremony designed to recognize the best in youth educational video game design and coding. At the ceremony, top students were awarded prizes for their work based on the technical quality of their game, its educational content, the quality of the original artwork and animations, teamwork, research skills, and the overall production process.

Among the prizes, student winners were awarded a one-year subscription to the Adobe Creative Cloud, to support their future game design efforts. On behalf of Adobe, we want to congratulate all of the winners and encourage them to continue to explore their creative talents. To check out all the recognized student-designed games please visit Globaloria’s Game Gallery.

All Female Developer Team from Arizona State University Follow Dreams

— Team ‘Femme Fatale’ shown in photo left to right: Liza Gutierrez, Jennifer Davidson, Samantha Hannis, Marcella Martinez, Skylar Mowery (Rachel Ramsey not pictured.) Photo by GIT major, Tessa Menken

— Team ‘Femme Fatale’ shown in photo left to right: Liza Gutierrez, Jennifer Davidson, Samantha Hannis, Marcella Martinez, Skylar Mowery (Rachel Ramsey not pictured.) Photo by GIT major, Tessa Menken

Under guidance from Graphic Information Technology (GIT) professor Arnaud Ehgner, a team of female students from Arizona State University (ASU) has been working tirelessly on a school project to develop a one-level game on par with those created by industry professionals.

Maia, a 2D side-scroll action game for portable devices, is a magical jungle adventure that leads the player through a series of mysterious temples and ruins where the priestess—Maia—tries to head off an attack and keep peace in the village of Kuma.

The game is developed using 3D models for a 2D game. While the scenery is 2D, the characters are created first in 3D, and then transplanted into a 2D world. The team chose to develop the game using Adobe solutions including Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Flash Professional because of the compatibility across platforms. Illustrator is used for the game’s concept art; Photoshop to finalize artwork with shading, touch-ups, and closing up texture seams; and Flash Professional for creating an engaging game with consistency across platforms.

“Adobe Photoshop also helps us play with the different perspectives by easily letting us translate and rotate the 3D models onto a 2D plane,” said team leader Rachel Ramsey.

The game targets female players with a strong leading female character. “I am so excited to be a part of Maia, as it has been one of my childhood dreams to create a video game with a strong female protagonist,” notes team member Jennifer Davidson.

Maia, now being expanded to three levels, will officially launch at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2014 for the Independent Gaming Competition and be available as a free demo for a limited time on iOS and Android tablet and mobile devices.

Find out more information: Maia on FacebookMaia on TwitterMaia on Tumblr.

New Game Developer Tools in the Adobe Creative Cloud

Today we announced an exciting new addition to the Adobe Creative Cloud with the release of our first Game Developer Tools offering. New tools including Adobe Scout, the Adobe Gaming SDK and Adobe Flash C++ Compiler are designed to help publishers and developers rapidly build, optimize and deliver amazing 2D and 3D games to more than 1.3 billion connected desktops and 500 million smartphones and tablets worldwide. As the leading choice for popular social game studios, AAA game developers and indie developers alike, Adobe’s Game Developer Tools makes it much easier for developers to maximize productivity, game quality and reach the largest gaming audience across PCs and mobile devices.

As a special promotion, we’re including this first release of Scout in a free membership to Creative Cloud, along with trial versions of Flash Professional CS6 and Flash Builder 4.7 Premium. Creative Cloud paid membership includes full versions of Flash Professional and Flash Builder and will also include future versions of Scout following the introductory promotion. To find out more about the new Game Developer Tools in the Adobe Creative Cloud, visit our latest blog post here.

Better Learning Through Game Design

Improving science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills for students is no longer confined to pencils, paper and flash cards. Educators today must embrace the latest technology to equip students with the skills to succeed. The World Wide Workshop’s Globaloria program takes a proactive approach to break out of the traditional education mold and help educators and students meet challenges with an innovative curriculum and social learning platform. With Globaloria, students in grades 6 through 12 learn STEM and computing knowledge through hands-on game design and programming with Adobe Creative Suite – providing students with a chance to build critical skills for college and career success with industry standard software.

“Students on the downside of the digital divide benefit greatly from the blended learning approach that this innovative initiative delivers,” says Dr. Joe Gonzales, school superintendent of East Austin College Prep Academy in Texas. “Globaloria transforms the way they engage with core curriculum, bringing STEM topics to life through game design.”

Students learn to design and program games using Adobe Flash Professional, chosen by Globaloria developers to expose participants to an industry-leading tool that is popular in the job market. At higher levels, students integrate assets created using Adobe Creative Suite, including characters designed in Adobe Photoshop, game elements created in Adobe Illustrator and effects created using Adobe Fireworks. These games are not only fun to play, but are also based on STEM-related or social issue topics. Check out a couple of these games such asHouse Fixers 2, where players must reduce fractions correctly before time runs out and an animated house collapses, and Tiger Savior, a safari-themed game designed to educate players about environmental threats facing tigers around the world.

“Many students who never learned to code before and who never thought of themselves as programmers are delving into coding through their use of Flash in the course of their Globaloria experience,” said Dr. Idit Harel Caperton, president and founder of the World Wide Workshop. “We have built a highly structured, yet user-friendly and playful environment for youth to take their first steps into computer science and software engineering.”

Research shows that students who participate in the Globaloria game design program gain measurable benefits in the classroom and beyond. They achieve higher test scores in core academic subjects, develop critical digital literacy skills that prepare them for success at higher levels of education and are more likely to gravitate toward STEM topics and IT as areas of educational and professional interest. To learn more about how Globaloria helps students achieve success, read the full story here. Also visit gaming.adobe.com to see what else can be accomplished using Adobe Gaming technology.

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