Results tagged “HTML”

Teaching with Modern Tools to Prepare the Next Generation of Web Designers and Developers

This week at Adobe’s Create the Web event, we unveiled a new set of innovations called Adobe Edge Tools & Services. We think these announcements are really exciting for students who want to learn how to build killer apps and experiences for iOS, Android, Windows, WebOS, Blackberry and for the full range of today’s modern Web browsers. Importantly, Adobe is making this free to students and education institutions around the world. 

One of the most important tools is Adobe Edge Animate 1.0, which lets students easily create Web animations and interactive experiences. Built from the ground up using modern Web technologies, we think this is a terrific tool to help students learn the fundamentals of interactive design and animation across devices. It’s easy to use, so students can quickly go from “sketch-to-prototype” using the modern standards and approaches used by commercial design firms. And it allows you to create some really stunning experiences. A great example of this new modern Web is the site for the “Paranorman” movie, which looks awesome across both tablet as well as a browser.

The announcements this week also underscore our commitment to open standards, and the modern Web. We outlined a number of contributions made to the Web platform in cooperation with the standards and open source communities. From layout and foundational graphics to amazing cinematic effects (check out the CSS Custom Filters in Chrome Canary), we are focused on making the Web a more expressive platform overall.  

There’s a great deal of excitement in the education community around these announcements:

“Teaching complex subjects such as animation, interactivity, and responsive design has been difficult for a number of reasons; primary among these are the amount of prerequisite knowledge required to even approach these activities, and the sheer amount of unaided time and effort required. What Adobe is now doing with the Edge Tools and Services is astounding because they are introducing tools which address both of these issues. This allows the instructor to teach concepts and techniques using tangible assets and the student to freely express their vision in a much more direct and familiar way. In terms of emerging web technologies: Adobe has thrown open the doors to a renaissance!” Joseph Labrecque, Senior Interactive Software Engineer, Adjunct Professor, University of Denver

“Reflow is going to be a huge teaching tool when it comes to Responsive Web Design. I am also looking forward to playing with the Edge apps and discovering how they integrate with each other and the Creative Cloud apps in the context of workflow. This looks like it is going to be fun to discover…and then teach.” Tom Green, Professor of interactive Multimedia, Humber Institute of Technology

“As HTML5 continues to provide web designers new opportunities to create more complex web projects using animation, responsive layouts, and web fonts, Adobe has created Edge Tools and Services to make some of these complex techniques easier. Both designers, and especially students, can quickly get the opportunity to become familiar with these new tools and find how easily they enhance their web projects, especially with Adobe providing most of these tools for free. These new tools will allow designers the opportunity to become more efficient and effective in producing better quality web work for today’s changing web environment.” Matthew Leach, Director & Author, Adjunct Professor, Colorado Technical University, The Art Institute of Colorado, Westwood College, SUNY, International Academy of Design and Technology, Author for Wynn Press

“Rather than attempting to make one big super tool, Adobe is making smaller focused tools for specific tasks. This will allow folks to use the tooling where they are helpful, but not require a complete rethinking of how you are comfortable working today.” Jason Madsen, Department Chair, Full Sail Univeristy

Again, to make it easier for educators to introduce these modern tools into the classroom, Adobe is offering Edge tools and services for free for students, educators and education institutions. All of the Edge Tools and Services are of course part of the Adobe Creative Cloud. You can learn more about these announcements here. How would you use these tools in the classroom? Drop us a note in the comments section or follow us on Twitter.

 

Technology and Expression

With MAX 2011 only days away, I am reflecting on all the accomplishments during the past year, within Adobe and across the industry. It’s been both an exciting and tumultuous time. At Adobe, as we release new software and continue to innovate, our focus remains on enabling creative expression.

How we enable that has involved a wide range of technologies over almost 30 years. This has included inventing technology to drive the desktop publishing revolution, electronic documents, multimedia on CD-ROMs, enabling digital photography, tooling for Dynamic HTML back in Web 1.0, vector graphics, interactivity and later video on the Web, defining DNG for digital negatives, XMP for standardized metadata, deploying applications across devices, and much more.

We work to enable great expression across mediums, and where there are existing approaches that serve well we take full advantage of them. Where there are gaps in technology we invest in innovation to drive breakthroughs and enable new capabilities to support this work.

We are in another time of flux and disruption, as we have experienced before. Some of the most visually compelling work on the Web has been done in Flash over the years, but this is changing now that innovation in HTML has been moving more quickly. HTML5 can be used to deliver rich experiences on the Web, and will become ubiquitous across mobile devices and desktop computers. We love the experiences HTML5 is enabling and the standardization of a richer Web.

Adobe is developing great software around HTML5. We have of course been making tools in support of HTML for over 15 years now, and the move to HTML5 will mean even more innovation in our software. We are working on a variety of efforts around this opportunity. In addition to enhancing Dreamweaver for HTML5, one of the new areas we are working on is motion graphics and interactive design. This is what the Adobe Edge project is focusing on. Over 100,000 people have downloaded the preview release of Edge, and with feedback from the community we are continuing to add new functionality to make a really terrific new design tool for HTML.

We are actively participating in standards groups such as the W3C and contributing to the open source WebKit project to help advance HTML directly. Most recently we have contributed code to bring CSS Regions and CSS Exclusions to WebKit, and have helped advance these in web standards working groups. These capabilities enable designers to build sophisticated, magazine-style layouts on the Web. Previously, intricate print-style layouts seen in magazines, newspapers and textbooks could not be easily duplicated in website form. WebKit forms the basis of both the Apple Safari and Google Chrome browsers, and the work we have contributed is already in the WebKit main line and early builds of Chromium and has also been implemented in Internet Explorer 10 preview release.

As we increase our work on advancing HTML and resulting innovation across browsers, our efforts on Flash will be to continue to push the boundaries of expressiveness through rapid innovation with the view to explore future areas that can be brought back into the standards process for the Web.

In this way we can continue to enhance what is possible to express on the web, and you will see more contributions from Adobe to help advance HTML, even as soon as next week.

As much as we can get caught up in the dynamics of one technology versus another, there were technologies for expression before this current generation, and there will be other new technologies still to come, which we can only imagine today. Adobe’s ongoing mission is to enable you to create and express yourself and we will enable that however possible, and where it’s impossible today we will do our part to help enable it in the future.

We will be going more deeply into this and a lot more at Adobe MAX, which is October 3-5 in Los Angeles.

Muse Hits 120,000 Downloads After Day One

Yesterday Adobe launched the beta of Muse (code name) a new Mac OS and Windows app that promises to let graphic designers create websites as easily as they create layouts for print.  The response has this time been pretty, pretty, pretty, pretty good – 120,000 downloads from the Adobe Labs website.  Actually those are astonishing numbers and show that designers really need something like this.   I bet those other Muse guys would like 120,000 downloads in one day!

The app was developed by some of the folks that built InDesign, which has become the standard for page layout and is now leading the charge towards digital publishing.  

We’ve also seen some commentary, in the forums, from the web developer community regarding Muse. Just a reminder folks that Muse was created for graphic designers to enable them to design and publish professional, unique HTML websites without writing code or working within restrictive (ie boring) templates.  It is something that designers have been asking for and will not impact the continued innovation across our other web development tools and technologies.

However we are taking constructive feedback from all constituencies into our product plans, as Muse matures.   So keep it coming designers, developers…

Flash to HTML5 Conversion Tool on Adobe Labs

For those who saw Adobe demo a new tool codenamed “Wallaby” at MAX last October, it’s now available on Adobe Labs, where it was released today. Wallaby is an Adobe AIR application that allows designers and developers to convert Adobe Flash Professional files into HTML5 with a simple drag and drop of the mouse, quickly and easily expanding the distribution of creative content across platforms.  Wallaby is a glimpse at the type of innovations we are making in Flash and HTML5, both imperative technologies that we will continue investing in for the long-term.

This experimental technology has been released on Adobe Labs in response to feedback from customers who said they wanted access to it after seeing it demoed at MAX. We invite customers to download Wallaby, try out the code it generates, and provide feedback on how they are using it to create simple animations like banner ads and translating graphical content. User response to the Wallaby technology preview will enable us to better understand how we can continue to support customers who want to reduce their learning curve for HTML5 development while leveraging the tools and skills they have today and reach users across more devices than ever.

Wallaby has a very simple UI and provides a path for users to input existing .FLA files and export HTML5 code. Users can then leverage their programming skills to further edit or optimize the code generated. Wallaby’s conversion to HTML5 allows content created in Flash Professional to be viewed within browsers running the WebKit rendering engine, including Google Chrome and Safari on iOS devices iPad, iPhone and iPod touch.

With more than 3 million Flash developers in the creative community we continue to look for new ways to help them build on their existing skills and look for new ways to make their content available to the widest possible audiences. The wider the audience, the greater the opportunities to build business around digital content.

Users can access the Wallaby preview technology for free today on Adobe Labs.


Open Access to Content and Applications

Some have been surprised at the lack of inclusion of Flash Player on a recent magical device.

Ironically, Flash was originally designed for pen computing tablets, about 15 years before that market was ready to take off. Flash exists now only due to its finding an alternate route in its use — first filling a niche on the Web by enabling low-bandwidth vector graphics in the early days and then rapidly adding new capabilities over the past decade. That includes bringing animation, streaming audio, rich interactivity, arbitrary fonts, two-way audio/video communication, local storage, and enabling the video revolution on the Web.

By augmenting the capabilities of HTML, Flash has been incredibly successful in its adoption, with over 85% of the top web sites containing Flash content and Flash running on over 98% of computers on the Web. It is used for the majority of casual games, video, and animation on the Web and familiar brands like Nike, Hulu, BBC, Major League Baseball, and more rely on Flash to deliver the most compelling experiences to over a billion people.

Now we are at an important crux for the future of Flash. A wide variety of devices beyond personal computers are arriving, many of which will be used to browse the Web, making it increasingly challenging to deliver what creators and users of content and applications have come to expect of Flash on personal computers — seamless, consistent and rich experiences. The Flash engineering team has taken this on with a major overhaul of the mainstream Flash Player for a variety of devices.

We are now on the verge of delivering Flash Player 10.1 for smartphones with all but one of the top manufacturers. This includes Google’s Android, RIM’s Blackberry, Nokia, Palm Pre and many others across form factors including not only smartphones but also tablets, netbooks, and internet-connected TVs. Flash in the browser provides a competitive advantage to these devices because it will enable their customers to browse the whole Web. This is being accomplished via the Open Screen Project, where we are working with over 50 partners to make this a reality across a wide array of devices. For example, the recent Nexus One from Google will rock with a great experience in the browser with Flash Player 10.1.

So, what about Flash running on Apple devices? We have shown that Flash technology is starting to work on these devices today by enabling standalone applications for the iPhone to be built on Flash. In fact, some of these apps are already available in the Apple App Store such as FickleBlox and Chroma Circuit. This same solution will work on the iPad as well. We are ready to enable Flash in the browser on these devices if and when Apple chooses to allow that for its users, but to date we have not had the required cooperation from Apple to make this happen.

Longer term, some point to HTML as eventually supplanting the need for Flash, particularly with the more recent developments coming in HTML with version 5. I don’t see this as one replacing the other, certainly not today nor even in the foreseeable future.

Adobe supports HTML and its evolution and we look forward to adding more capabilities to our software around HTML as it evolves. If HTML could reliably do everything Flash does that would certainly save us a lot of effort, but that does not appear to be coming to pass. Even in the case of video, where Flash is enabling over 75% of video on the Web today, the coming HTML video implementations cannot agree on a common format across browsers, so users and content creators would be thrown back to the dark ages of video on the Web with incompatibility issues.

The productivity and expressiveness of Flash remain advantages for the Web community even as HTML advances. The Flash team will drive innovation over the coming years as they have over the past decade to enable experiences that aren’t otherwise possible. With the ability to update the majority of Web clients in less than a year, Flash can make this innovation available to our customers much more quickly than HTML across a variety of browsers.

Our mission at Adobe is to revolutionize how people engage with ideas and information, and we focus daily on how to best empower designers and developers to express themselves most fully and creatively. To have the greatest creative control combined with the most productive tools and broadest ability to deploy their content and applications. We support whatever technologies and formats that best enable our customers to accomplish these goals, and work to drive technology forward where there are gaps that we can fill. The blend of Flash and HTML are best together, enabling anyone to make pragmatic decisions to use these for their strengths to make the best experiences on the Web.

Engaging with ideas and information also means ensuring there is an open ecosystem and freedom to view and interact with the content and applications a user chooses. This model of open access has proven to be more effective in the long term than a walled approach, where a manufacturer tries to determine what users are able to see or approves and disapproves individual content and applications. We strongly believe the Web should remain an open environment with consistent access to content and applications regardless of your viewing device.

We are continuing to focus on enabling our customers to do their best work, and helping them reach people effectively and reliably around the world across operating systems, browsers, and a variety of devices.

Update: I’ve responded as well in the comments below.

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Results on Adobe Products from Digital Marketing Report by SoDA

Interesting report published this morning by SoDA (the Society of Digital Agencies) about the current state of the digital marketing industry — increase in online marketing spending, new and emerging trends, as well as uptick in jobs in 2010.

Surveying more than 1,000 industry professionals — with more than 30% of those surveyed from traditional ad agencies and corporate brands — the 2010 Digital Marketing Outlook also reveals the most sought after technical skill sets.

  • Adobe Dreamweaver and Adobe Flash dominating along with other popular technologies like HTML, CSS, ActionScript, WordPress and Drupal.
  • 75 percent of survey respondents indicating Adobe Flash as the most important tool for their organization
  • Flash remaining the No. 1 skill that nearly 80 percent of respondents will look for when hiring new staff this year
  • More than 50 percent say Microsoft Silverlight is not used in their organizations while only seven percent consider it an important technology

The full report can be viewed here.

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