Results tagged “Summit”

Adobe’s Matt Rozen on the Rise of Social Journalism

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The 2013 AYV Summit is only a week away! This year, we invited social journalist and Adobe employee Matt Rozen to talk to the students about using social media to amplify their work and connect with others.  We sat down with Matt to ask him a few questions about his role at Adobe and what it means to be a “social journalist.” Here’s what he had to say:

 

Adobe: First things first – what is your favorite social media platform?

Matt: Is it possible to choose just one? I guess I would have to say Instagram is my favorite right now because the platform provides a quick snapshot of what people are seeing, thinking and feeling. But I love Twitter for work, and Tumblr has so many possibilities for creative people, and Facebook is great for connecting with old friends and family. It’s so hard to choose!

Adobe: What exactly is a social journalist?

Matt: A journalist used to just be someone who put pen to paper in newspaper and magazines. With the Internet, this term has evolved to include storytelling via blogs and social media platforms. It’s citizen journalism, really. The opportunity to be a social journalist is available to everyone, and what I love most is the ability to be at the zeitgeist of all topics at all times and to share our stories with the world, often in small, digestible bites. As the Group Manager of Corporate Social Media at Adobe, I manage Adobe’s social media team and consult with other teams within Adobe on social strategy. Many times we discuss how they, or their teams, can be social journalists too.

Adobe: Why is social media important for youth?

Matt: Just the other day, I took a pic of my 7-year old daughter and within minutes she asked, “Dad, did you share that photo on Facebook yet?” She doesn’t even have a Facebook account. This is the world we live in; there’s no getting around social media now.  It is the future of work, commerce, education and government, making it important for all of us to understand what it should (and shouldn’t!) be used for.

Adobe: What advice do you have for youth?

Matt: Take advantage of the amazing media tools available to you today. For the first time ever, we all have the ability to quickly create photos and videos and write essays (or blogs) and share them with the world – all on your phone!  The opportunities are endless. Just start creating but be careful, too, about what you share and with whom. The internet has a long memory

Adobe: How can creativity and social media make the world a better place?

Matt: Creativity always makes the world a better place – and there’s always room for more of it. The more you create, the more creative inspiration will come to you and the more you’ll feel positive about yourself and the world around you. Positive people are the ones who change the world because they make other people happy. And then social media just amplifies that positivity. Like I said, the opportunities are endless.

What questions do you have for Matt? Join @AdobeYV’s Creativity Twitter Chat this Thursday, August 8, at 10 a.m. PT for a chance to ask him and other creative professionals your most burning questions. Join the conversation using the hashtag #AYVSummit13.

Making Site Search Experiences More Targeted

15CaptureThis week we released the newest version of Adobe Search&Promote. This release promises to give our customers even more opportunity to give their site visitors relevant search-driven experiences. And today at Omniture Summit 2011 online sheet music retailer Musicnotes.com helped us tell attendees all about these new capabilities.

So what’s new? In the true spirit of online marketing optimization, we’ve taken additional steps to make site marketers and merchandisers more effective in their jobs. Specifically, we’ve deeply integrated Adobe Test&Target functionality with Search&Promote.

First, marketers or merchandisers can now test a variety of business rules before pushing them live to all their site visitors or specific segments. The great thing about business rules in Search&Promote is that it allows the marketer to influence search outcomes based on what he or she thinks (or what the metrics indicate) is the best direction to take the visitor who, through search or navigation, expresses interest in a particular item. Now, marketers can test their hypotheses — rather than wondering what would have happened if they’d used an alternate business rule. Additionally, you can take advantage of the cool new simulator we introduced in December. This means that you can see the results of these alternate rules-generated experiences the way they would look live on your site. You don’t even have to leave the Search&Promote marketer interface to do this as long as you are a current Test&Target user.

Second, beyond testing, Search&Promote’s integration with Test&Target allows businesses to utilize targeted business rules to make search experiences even more releva
nt and personalized. For example, Musicnotes’ Bill Aicher today in our Search&Promote Summit 2011 breakout described new strategies for presenting relevant results — and eliminating noise — by using a targeted “guitarist” business rule. He also demonstrated how using geo-targeting will help create more relevant site search experiences based on delivering results according to popularity of certain kinds of music around the world. Very cool. If you weren’t able to attend this session, the recording will soon be available to Summit attendees on Omniture.com.

If you want to learn more about the new release, I encourage you to check out this video of my colleague, product manager Mark Tuyay, demonstrating the new capabilities now available in Adobe Search&Promote.

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