Submitting Mobile Data to Adobe CQ using a Sling Post Servlet

-Scott MacDonald

You can create an Adobe CQ mobile form using JQuery Mobile API and submit the data to Adobe CQ using a Sling Post Servlet. When a mobile user fills in the form and clicks the submit button, form data is submitted to Adobe CQ.



Read the full blog post at Adobe Digital Marketing Blog

Developing a Spring MVC project using Maven, JSTL tags, and data persistence

-Scott MacDonald

Scotts Digital Community article falls into a general programming discussion (as opposed to an Adobe Enterprise development article) and provides details on developing a Spring MVC application that persists data.



Read the full blog post at Adobe Digital Marketing Blog

Custom CQ5 workflow step that integrates Twitter and Jabber

-Michael Marth

As part of the IKS project each CMS vendor completes a couple of benchmarks in order to establish a baseline against which future semantic improvements can be measured. For benchmark 3 "Workflow Service" Bertrand and I chose to implement the task "Create a multi-channel (email, SMS, instant messaging, Twitter,...) notification service for workflow transitions". We have created an automated workflow step that can be inserted into a custom workflow and either send an e-mail, send a direct message on Twitter or send a chat message on GTalk/Jabber. The corresponding message's payload is the path to the content node in the workflow plus an optional custom text.



Read the full blog post at Adobe Digital Marketing Blog

Submitting Mobile Form Data to Adobe CQ

-Scott MacDonald

You can create an Adobe CQ mobile form using JQuery Mobile API. When a mobile user fills in the form and clicks the submit button, form data is submitted to Adobe CQ. You can develop an OSGi bundle operation to process the submitted form data to meet your business requirements.



Read the full blog post at Adobe Digital Marketing Blog

Ways to access your content with JCR (part 1)

- Jörg Hoh

If you are a developer and need to work with databases, you often relay on the features your framework offers you to get your work done easily. Working directly with JDBC and SQL is not really comfortable, writing “SELECT something FROM table” with lots of constraints can be tedious …

The SQL language offers only the “select” statement to retrieve data from the database. JCR offers multiple ways to actually get access to a node:

Each of these methods serve for different purposes.

  • session.getNode(path) is used, when you know exactly the path of a node. That’s comparable to a “select * from table where path = “/content/geometrixx/en” in SQL, which is a direct lookup of a well-known node/row.
  • node.getNodes() returns all child nodes below the node. This method has no equivalent in the SQL world, because in JCR there are not only distinct and independent nodes, but nodes might have a hierarchical relation.
  • The JCR search is the equivalent of the SQL query, it can return a set of nodes. Yes, ANSI SQL 92 is much more powerful, but let’s ignore that for this article, okay?



Read the complete post on the Things on a content management system blog.

How to manage Hot backup Or Manage Disaster Recovery in CQ

- Yogesh Upadhyay

There are various approach, I am listing them with pros and cons

Approach 1: Use clustering, but direct the requests only to one node. In case of problems with this node just switch over to the other node. Essentially this is an active-passive scenario.

+ proven technology, documented and fully supported feature

+ automatic fail over easily possible

- additional license cost

- Latency issue might effect performance

- Managing cluster is sometime difficult


Read the complete post at the Adobe CQ/Adobe WEM blog.

Configuring the Adobe CQ Dispatcher

Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve created content that addresses several top questions related to the Adobe CQ Dispatcher. This is in response to questions we’ve heard from you, our community. I encourage you to give a read and also check out the more in-depth documentation I link to further below.


Read the complete post at The Experience Delivers blog

Creating MBeans for your CQ5 application

-- Jörg Hoh

JMX is the de-facto standard for monitoring java processes and applications. A lot of monitoring systems have the ability to consume these data.

By default CQ 5.5 has a number of MBeans, which offer runtime information about internal state. Most interesting ones are the MBeans about the repository state and the replication MBeans. But it isn’t hard to create your own MBeans, so you provide information about the internal state of your application to the monitoring system; or you can monitor resources which are critical to your application and use case.

In Cq5 we are working in a OSGI environment, so we will use one of my favorite patterns, the OSGI whiteboard pattern. We will use the JMX-Whiteboard bundle of the Apache Aries project to register services to JMX. Also that implementation is very short and understandable and shows the power of the whiteboard pattern. (I already had a short blog entry on this last year.)

In this example I want to demonstrate it on an already existing counter, the total number of requests handled by sling.It requires CQ 5.5, where the JMX whiteboard bundle is already deployed by default; but if you install the JMX Whiteboard bundle yourself, you can also use older versions of CQ5.



Read the complete post at the Things on a Content Management System blog.

Two new best practice articles now live…

We’ve just published two new articles in the CQ best practice series:

A list of the five articles published so far is at this URL. In the days to come, we’ll post more best practices, tips, and tricks that you can apply to your work.

Stay tuned!


Read the original blog post at The Doc Fox.

Creating custom CQ email services

- Scott Macdonald

You can create a custom CQ email service that lets CQ users send email messages from a CQ web page. To create a CQ email service, you develop an OSGi bundle that uses the Java Mail API. You can also develop a JSP that uses JQuery that calls the OSGi service and passes data that is sent as an email message.

 Caption – A CQ email client

To follow along with this development article, you need to download the Java Mail API at the following URL:

The Java Mail API is used within the OSGi bundle that sends email messages when the client initiates a request. The CQ email service comprises of a client (shown in the previous illustration) developed by using JQuery and an OSGi bundle. 



Read the full post at Scott's Digital Community.