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Gabia Unleashes Creativity, Efficiency

A web services firm enhances design production, efficiency, and client service, while reducing licensing costs by more than 20% with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

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Maximizing creativity and efficiency, minimizing overhead

South Korea-based Gabia Inc. specializes in Internet infrastructure services. The company provides its clients with everything from domain name registration and web hosting solutions to website design, image and video hosting, and e-learning solutions.

Marketing all of these services requires large volumes of brochures, sell sheets, event signage, customer case studies, and other materials with targeted messaging and eye-catching, effective design. As a vital part of the company’s operations, the design team’s task is twofold: On a day-to-day basis, they generate marketing materials that assist the company in winning new business; and focus on keeping existing customers loyal and up-to-date with new products and services.

“Effective, vibrant design is a part of everything we do to support our clients, our marketing and sales, and our overall brand,” says Kwangyoon Won, director of Gabia’s sales division. “We make it a priority to create innovative products and to support them in the marketplace by rigorously and continuously up-leveling our design and creative capabilities.”

Empowering creative teams

Because Gabia has an inherent and constant need to design and produce creative content, such as e-commerce sites for clients, as efficiently as possible, it’s a priority to equip teams with the right creative tools for the job. For years, Gabia has used Adobe creative software to enable a skilled staff of designers to maintain high standards for generating beautiful, professional materials—both to market their own products and create websites for clients. Adobe creative software has been the standard at the company due to its flexibility, power, integration, and rich feature sets.

As Gabia’s growth and innovation continued, the importance of staying current on the latest version of software and services became critical for delivering large amounts of design work. For the IT team, streamlining the management associated with software licensing and deployment would help eliminate the time-consuming task of managing individual license numbers and installing the necessary programs on the team’s desktops.

“Adobe creative tools are at the heart of our operation,” says Won. “Because we are efficiency-driven and Adobe software is so central to our business, we began looking at the different licensing models and options for the software.”

Collaborating in the cloud

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After evaluating new licensing options from Adobe that would provide teams with the best solutions
while increasing efficiencies, Gabia chose Creative Cloud for teams. “With Creative Cloud for teams, our designers can download the software they need to either create marketing materials or design websites for clients. Constant updates are provided by Adobe so everyone can stay on the latest versions of software with ease,” says Won. “Creative Cloud for teams also offers 100GB of storage, so team members can exchange ideas on designs, regardless of location. Employees no longer need to email files or send drives back and forth because the current files are available to everyone on the team in the cloud.”

Creative Cloud for teams has streamlined collaboration and file sharing and virtually eliminated communication delays. The workflow has been greatly improved because fewer handoffs are required to accomplish tasks and individuals can accomplish more on their own with access to all of the intuitive new software available in Creative Cloud for teams.

Gabia can execute projects faster because contributors can simultaneously share the same files in Adobe Photoshop CC, Dreamweaver CC, or Illustrator CC, as they are working on them in the cloud. Each time layouts, typography, or images are revised, everyone on the team is apprised and working with the same versions of files.

More creative control, less coding

Speed and efficiency is necessary in streamlining production of marketing materials for Gabia products, but it is equally essential when accommodating client needs for new or revised materials. To meet this need, Gabia was able to try new creative tools available within Creative Cloud for teams (all at no extra charge with a Creative Cloud membership) including new creative tools that weren’t available previously in Creative Suite.

“It’s wonderful to be able to try new software that we probably would not have before,” says Won. “It has given us new creative functionality that is expanding our repertoire and removing some of the limitations of purchasing packaged software.”

Gabia’s designers have adopted Adobe Muse CC and Adobe Edge Tools and Services, both available in Creative Cloud for teams. With Muse CC, graphic designers can stretch their capabilities by publishing websites, that work well on virtually any device, without writing code; with Adobe Edge Animate CC, the team can add interactivity and animation to client websites. Both products extend the capabilities of Gabia’s design teams and accelerate delivery of customer requests for new websites or ongoing updates.

With Creative Cloud for teams, designers can save images directly from a layout for use on the web, or can quickly create responsive websites or animation effects without requiring special code development. “With Creative Cloud for teams, we now can perform small jobs, such as video coding or image resizing, without having to rely on a specialized designer, code developer, or video producer,” says Kim Sooyeon, assistant manager of Gabia’s creative division. “It results in faster turnaround time for our clients and a lot more creative autonomy for everyone.”

Easier on IT, significantly reduced costs

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In addition to designers, the IT team is more efficient as well. With Creative Cloud for teams, Gabia can assign licenses to users through email using a web-based console to easily distribute the programs. Designers then download the software they need. An administrator no longer needs to manually check each serial number to install the necessary programs on individual desktops, freeing up IT time to spend on more strategic activities.

Gabia as a whole has also experienced greatly reduced licensing costs. “With Creative Cloud for teams, our licensing costs were cut by more than 20% in comparison to desktop software,” says Won. “At Gabia, we will continue to use Creative Cloud for teams; it’s now a part of our core infrastructure for inventing and delivering new creative businesses and catering faster and better to our clients.

Read the Gabia Inc. case study.

8:43 AM Permalink

Beyond Technique or Medium

When Pawel Nolbert started sketching and drawing as a schoolboy in Wieruszow, Poland, his parents encouraged his creative passion by buying him a computer. Although he admits using it for video games at first, a friend soon introduced him to Adobe Photoshop. That was the spark that launched Nolbert toward becoming an internationally recognized designer and art director whose marquee clients include Nike, Sony, and Mercedes-Benz. Recently featured as one of Adobe’s New Creatives, we took the time to learn a bit more about his background and approach to design.

Adobe: What was your introduction to graphic design?
Nolbert: In the beginning, I was really interested in customizing operating systems, creating wallpapers, “skins,” and different looks—like the ways you can customize desktops in Windows. Then, around 2001, a friend showed me Photoshop; I didn’t really know it existed before then. I was playing with other software at the time, but when I saw the possibilities of Photoshop, I quickly forgot about the other software.

I mostly worked on personal, non-commercial projects and artwork. Clients started to approach me after I started publishing my work online on deviantART in 2002. My old artwork is still there, but I publish my new projects on Behance and my own website, Nolbert.com.

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Adobe: How did your career evolve from that point?
Nolbert: When I started publishing online, I got small assignments to create stickers, flyers, and so on. It quickly started growing into something bigger. I even began getting offers from agencies, but preferred to stay as a freelancer.

My style has evolved quite significantly, from an illustrative style to a mixed media style. I didn’t want to be limited by doing one strict style or type of work, or confining myself to any technique or medium. I wanted to be quite universal in that regard. So, I quickly expanded from classic illustration to incorporate more digital elements, very often including 3D graphics.

Adobe Photoshop CC is still the main tool I use every day to create. After that, I use Adobe Illustrator CC for simple vector graphics. When I was working on a lot of websites—from about 2005 to 2010—I also used Adobe Flash Professional for animation and even did some of coding, but I’m not doing as much of that anymore.

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Adobe: What types of commercial projects are you doing?
Nolbert: From the beginning, most of my work has been with advertising clients, mainly print and outdoor campaigns. Secondarily, I work on online projects. A lot of the campaigns extend to different media, so I have to blend different styles: I may paint some assets by hand and convert them to digital; or I may create 3D graphics or use scans or assets from different media to create the effects I want to achieve. Mostly, the end output comes from Photoshop.

Adobe: How exactly do you use Photoshop CC?
Nolbert: A good example is my self-portrait for Adobe’s I Am the New Creative site. It’s a mixture of photography and digital illustration. I used a photographic portrait and manipulated it to get the right proportions of head and face. Then I photographed my hands. Those were the base assets. From that point, I started to use Photoshop vector tools. I use them to maintain scalability and keep everything in control in terms of distortion.

For some reason, I prefer the simplified vectors in Photoshop to those in Illustrator. It doesn’t matter if I work on a web project or a print illustration; I often use vector tools to create different objects in my artwork. When I draw those vector compositions, I use all the textures to apply to vector elements. Then I add shading and different adjustment layers on top of that to create striking colors and compositions. That’s basically the process that I am using to create all my artwork.

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Adobe: Are you using any of the latest features in Photoshop CC?
Nolbert: I purchased Photoshop CC a few months back and one of new features that I really like is the Camera Raw filter that’s built into it. It was actually the feature that convinced me to switch from Adobe Creative Suite 6 to Creative Cloud, besides the cloud, of course, which is very convenient. What I love about Camera Raw is being able to master colors or do a basic retouch on photographs nondestructively.

Photoshop CC has a lot of features, small and big, that are really helpful. For example, the Crop tool now has a check button that lets you delete or keep the crop pixels. It’s important to have a good crop tool that lets you control your composition in simple photography and complex illustrations, and this one is much more convenient than in previous releases.

I love the new brushes; I use brushes a lot to achieve the right shading and the right finish for my compositions. The selection of brushes has been expanded in Photoshop CC and they have some new settings that let you control more of the brush parameters, which is especially versatile when using a graphics tablet.

I’m also really impressed with the optimization of the Liquify filter in Photoshop CC, too. It’s much faster and better. I use it a lot to apply distortions to photography or bitmap illustrations. When I work in a very high resolution, I like to use a huge brush size for the Liquify tool, but in CS5 and CS6 the brush size was limited. In Photoshop CC, the brush size has been increased greatly, and that is better for me when working with high-resolution imagery.

Sometimes I combine the Liquify and Warp tools. I use the Warp tool to do simple distortions, and in Photoshop CC it’s been improved in several ways. It produces smoother results than previous releases and you can now set interpolation algorithms like bicubic or bilinear for the Warp or Transform tools. That’s a really great feature—to control the output of tools in a more efficient way, especially for pixel-perfectionists.

Adobe: How else are you using, or would you like to use, Creative Cloud?
Nolbert: I really like that you can export settings with Creative Cloud applications, especially when you work across different computers. For example, I have a favorite set of brushes in Photoshop and it’s really helpful to be able to export those in a convenient way and use them on another computer.

I would also like to use Adobe Photoshop Lightroom to do more personal photography, like when I travel. I really got into photography through Instagram, mostly as a hobby. I think Lightroom can help me improve my photography by letting me manage and edit photos in the same interface. And I like the nondestructive editing capabilities.

I’ve also always wanted to use Adobe InDesign CC to work more on printed output media. I tried it a few years ago and liked it and now that it’s available in Creative Cloud I want to explore it more. I’m also excited about doing more with Adobe After Effects CC; I worked in After Effects on small projects years ago and I miss using it. Sometimes clients want to create animations, so I would love to explore applying After Effects to my projects on a bigger scale.

9:55 AM Permalink

Adobe Creative Cloud: A Creative Advantage

Adobe Creative Cloud for teams standardizes a studio’s design workflow.

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AppStudioz is an innovative web and mobile application development company that specializes in developing applications for various platforms and devices including iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry, Windows, and Facebook. In just three years, the company has developed apps for diverse industry segments including healthcare, consumer and retail, gaming, augmented reality, and wearable computing.

Although the dynamics of such a nascent industry keep evolving, core app design remains at the heart of what AppStudioz does to deliver its services across the world. The company needed a platform that would enhance the creative ability of its design team and one that was easily scalable and agile. A cloud-based solution emerged as a default answer.

“When we started our cloud discussions, we did a lot of research and held extensive sessions with designers,” says Preeti Singh, vice president of technology at AppStudioz. “After careful deliberations, top management, designers, and the IT team collectively and unanimously decided to adopt Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.”

For AppStudioz, adopting Adobe solutions was a natural choice primarily because the platform is an industry standard and the firm was already using Adobe tools extensively—specifically Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Additionally, a majority of its clients based in the United States and the United Kingdom had already adopted Adobe Creative Cloud; using Adobe Creative Cloud for teams helps standardize the process for the company and its clients.

Broadening designer expertise
The migration to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams took two weeks and was completed without any work disruption. The Adobe team helped AppStudioz train designers and programmers on Creative Cloud tools. “The ease of use of all the components of Adobe Creative Cloud for teams allowed us to quickly train our team on these tools to deliver great results for clients,” says Singh.

AppStudioz works extensively in the area of scalable graphics and Adobe Creative Cloud tools, specifically Adobe Photoshop CC, come in very handy. Photoshop CC makes it easy for AppStudioz’s designers to customize vectors at any point in the design stage. For instance, previously, if there was a figure with four sharp edges and designers wanted to make those edges rounded, they had to remake the entire figure. With Photoshop CC, designers can bring in alterations at any stage. “Such innovative features have given our designers the power to create newer designs with ease and efficiency,” says Singh.

The design team at AppStudioz is a mix of graphic designers, illustrators, and user interface designers, all using different Creative Cloud tools. “Adobe Creative Cloud tools integrate flawlessly with each other, which lets our designers concentrate on the creative challenges before them and not get bogged down in the technology,” says Singh.

With Creative Cloud, AppStudioz designers can start creating images in Photoshop CC or Illustrator CC and later open them in Adobe Dreamweaver CC or Flash Professional CC. Further, the team can switch back-and-forth between the tools and experiment with designs to get different results. “The integration among the tools in Creative Cloud has gone a long way in making our workflows smoother,” says Singh.

Adobe Creative Cloud for teams enables the AppStudioz design teams to work and collaborate from anywhere in the world. Additionally, it has helped the firm’s designers to explore new approaches for designing and developing content delivered across various channels and devices. Migrating to Adobe Creative Cloud gives the creative team the flexibility to work effectively at any location and experiment with the latest tools to deliver content across platforms and devices with ease.

Raising productivity while lowering total cost of ownership
The streamlined administration in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams has greatly helped AppStudioz to eliminate time-consuming manual processes such as installing packaged software and maintaining version consistency. It has also helped raise productivity across the company by simplifying software administration with license management, automated tracking, and version upgrades.

For AppStudioz, Creative Cloud for teams membership has significantly reduced the total cost of ownership for Adobe solutions by creating a standardized model for purchasing and deploying the most current versions of Adobe Creative Cloud tools. “The predictable, easily managed membership model in Creative Cloud for teams eliminates having to deal with lump-sum software purchases,” says Singh. In addition, Adobe Creative Cloud helps support AppStudioz’s rapid growth and streamlines management of creative tools for designers.

“Our firm is continually growing and changing,” says Singh. “Adobe Creative Cloud for teams is helping us manage this growth and scale up rapidly by giving ready access to the latest creative tools to our designers.”

Read the AppStudioz case study.

7:10 AM Permalink

Moving Ahead with Mac OS X 10.7 (And Higher)

We wanted to share some information about support plans for the next major release of our Creative Cloud desktop applications:

The next major releases will run on Mac OS X 10.7 and higher. Users on OS X 10.6 will continue to be able to use their current applications, but will need to update their operating systems if they want to install and run the newest Creative Cloud releases.

We’re seeing a small percentage of our members on OS X 10.6 and wanted to let users know in advance, so they can prepare for the next release of our desktop applications.

10:04 AM Permalink

Swiss Radio and Television Produces Stunning Sochi Opener

Broadcaster uses Adobe Creative Cloud workflow to create opener promoting the winter games

The Winter Games are a chance for us to witness magic moments of incredible artistry and athleticism performed by the amazing athletes competing there. But in order for us to do so, broadcasters around the world spent months preparing for that short period of intense coverage. For Swiss Radio and Television (SRF), a publicly funded broadcaster serving the German-speaking part of Switzerland, the preparations included creating a stunning opener that builds excitement for audiences tuning-in to the games. Patrick Arnecke, head of design and promotion, leads the creative team responsible for design and production of the on air campaign.

Adobe: Tell us about the Swiss Radio and Television.

Arnecke: The SRF is a publicly funded broadcaster that serves the German-speaking part of Switzerland. We maintain two full-blown 24/7 TV channels, a TV repeat channel for news programs, seven radio channels, and an extensive online portal.

Adobe: What teams do you work with at the SRF and what do they produce?

Arnecke: I’m the head of the design and promotion team. The design team consists of 25 designers who do all corporate design, motion graphics and interaction design for SRF. Creatively they are responsible for channel branding, campaigns, image clips and labels as well as show packaging. We also do all of the 2D and 3D animation used for our TV magazines and news shows. The promotion team has eleven editors and promo producers who work on traditional on-air trailers as well as cross media campaigns.

Adobe: Tell us about the work you’ve done for the Winter Games?

Arnecke: Last year during the summer we started to rethink our overall sports design. We have various sports programs on air and wanted to repackage the whole set of shows for SRF zwei, our main entertainment and sports channel. We regularly cover huge events like the Winter Games for the Swiss audience, and we needed to come up with a solution for those events as well, and tie that into the overall design.

We decided to center our redesign around the core idea of the “magic moment”—those rare moments when extraordinary athletic performance seems almost supernatural. We then spent five days shooting all the necessary plates using RED Epic and Phantom Flex cameras, special camera rigs with a high speed camera carousel, and a huge 15m x 9m x 7.5m green screen area. Among other things, we staged ice hockey, alpine skiing, figure skating, snowboarding, ski jumping, and cross country skiing. Everything was conceptualized, directed, and pre- and post-produced by four in-house designers. From that footage we produced a 28-second opener for our Sochi coverage along with the show packaging, and the promo teasers that we used to ramp up the campaign in January.

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Adobe: What products are you using to produce your content?

Arnecke: Right now we have a mix of Adobe Creative Cloud and Creative Suite 6 software. On the design team we use Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Our main tool for 2D animation is After Effects, and we rely on Cinema 4D as our main 3D package. The closer relationship between Adobe and Maxon and the strong connection between Cinema 4D and After Effects comes in very handy for our pipeline.

At the beginning of 2013 we started using Edge Animate to create small, interactive HTML5 elements to give our online news articles more depth and interactivity. For our video content, we started to work with SpeedGrade to give content from different sources a uniform look. During the last months we switched to Premiere Pro as our main editing tool, which replaces Final Cut Pro.

Adobe: What was the workflow for creating the Sochi opener?

Arnecke: In pre-production the responsible designers Martin Bernhard (director) and Simon Renfer (co-director) used Photoshop, with Wacom tablets and screens, to create the storyboards. On set and after the shoot was completed, we used SpeedGrade to convert the Phantom material and then edited the content in Premiere Pro. Lead 3D Artists Jürg Dummermuth and Simone Nucci did all of the 3D CGI with Cinema 4D. In addition to using After Effects for previsualization and animatics, it was also used for 2D animation, keying, rotoscoping, retouching, compositing, and grading. We’ve done a lot of smaller projects such as show openers and image trailers using Premiere Pro, but the Sochi opener is one of the biggest projects we’ve done to date with the new workflow.

Adobe: Why did you make the switch to Premiere Pro?

Arnecke: After Apple didn’t continue Final Cut Pro, we were looking for alternatives. The pipeline efficiencies that let us easily switch between Premiere Pro and After Effects are important to us. Premiere Pro is especially useful if we shoot on RED cameras because thanks to the Mercury Playback Engine we don’t have to convert and we can edit right away. We usually like to edit on set to see if what we’ve shot is exactly what we need.

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Adobe: Tell us how you’re using Adobe Edge Animate CC?

Arnecke: We have a small team of designers who work on infographics for our daily news shows. We use graphical content created for on-air programming, add interactivity and repackage that content for our news articles online. For example, for the election of Pope Franziskus or the 50th anniversary of the President Kennedy assassination we created interactive explanatory pieces with Edge Animate. These interactives give more depth to our news articles online and typically take us one to three days to produce—last year we did more than 150 of these.

See examples of the infographics here

Adobe: What’s next for your team?

Arnecke: We’re planning a seven day shoot that will take place in March for our summer sports. With the success of the winter sports workflow, we’ll be using a similar setup.

Read more about the use of Maxon Cinema 4D

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud

12:52 PM Permalink

Now Available: Creative Cloud Pre-Paid Annual Memberships

Adobe now offers a new convenient payment option for Creative Cloud customers.  Customers can now pre-pay for a full year of the individual complete membership plan to Creative Cloud. This option is available to individuals or students/teachers when purchasing direct on Adobe.com or through select channel partners.

Please visit Adobe.com or contact your channel partner for pricing details in your region.  Still have questions?  Read our FAQ.

 

9:59 AM Permalink

Did you hear that? A new version of Edge Animate CC is here!

Hello Edge Animate fans!

After months of intensive development from the Animate team, we’re proud to release a major update to Edge Animate CC (3.0) available right now with your Creative Cloud membership. This release comes jam-packed with brand new features, giving you the tools you need to keep pushing the boundaries of animating with HTML.

What will you find in this release?

Audio Support (!!)

Sound can be an essential component of any interactive multimedia experience. Whether it’s adding subtle sound effects or creating animated stories, audio will help you bring your narrative to life to enhance the experience of your viewer. We’re quite excited to bring you audio support using all the native HTML5 audio capabilities. This will let you import audio into your projects, synchronize sound with your timeline and easily control audio events with new snippets and playback controls. Since we’re using the browser as the player, anything you can do with sound in the browser you can do inside of Animate. Cool right?

We’ve put a lot of love into this feature and put together some documentation to help get you started. Check out Adding Audio to Your Animations to learn more.

Responsive Scaling

Creating motion for multiple screen sizes can be difficult. This is why we’re brought you responsive scaling to help your Animate projects scale up and down to fit different viewports. With this feature enabled, your projects will resize to fit whatever container you place it in and scale up and down as the container or browser resizes — keeping the aspect ratio of all your animations in place. To try it out, just check “Responsive Scaling” for the Stage properties, preview in the browser and watch the magic happen.

Script Loading

The web is beautiful in that there’s countless JavaScript libraries available which help you create anything you can imagine without having to write it yourself from scratch. If there’s anything we’ve learned from how you guys use Animate, it’s that you love bringing in JavaScript libraries to extend your compositions. Since Animate uses the open web to create your projects, it only made sense for us to easily allow you to bring in all your favourite libraries like GreensockEdge CommonsjQuery UI and many more. In the library panel you’ll find a new section called “Scripts” — click the plus button to bring in that favourite JS library from your hard drive, or point to an online source. 

But wait, there’s more! Also included in this release are enhancements to OAM publishing, usability improvements for motion paths and object alignment, and other goodies to make your editing experience even better. To see an overview of all the new features, check out What’s New in 3.0.

Can’t wait to get your hands on it? Click on the “Install” button beside Edge Animate CC in your Creative Cloud desktop app to install, or visit creative.adobe.com and select “Download”.

Thanks to you, our loyal fans, for your ongoing feedback and support which help us drive what happens with each release. You rock. Happy animating!

Sarah Hunt
Product Manager, Adobe Web P&A

10:39 AM Permalink

I AM THE NEW CREATIVE

Art directors are becoming animators. Print designers are becoming web designers. Illustrators are also photographers and editors who also shoot film. They are the New Creatives, and we are celebrating their work.

With the Creative Cloud our product teams have removed the barriers to creative expression: Designers can build parallax HTML5 experiences. Illustrators are making EPUBs. Photographers are using their cameras and Adobe technology to become filmmakers. And coders have the tools to make beautiful design.

It’s an amazing and interesting time in our industry; people have the ability to self-express, in any discipline, without boundaries. I Am The New Creative promotes the amazing work our community is producing and marks this moment in time as a movement and a celebration of creativity.

One of the most incredible aspects of this program has been watching creative professionals merge their mediums and their portraits to produce “New Creatives” versions of themselves.

There’s something magical about the compositions. As a designer there’s always a part of me in my work, but to personalize my work in this way, to make my work more representative of me, presents an alternative perspective. All of the artists we’re working with are enjoying this experience and are appreciative of our desire to promote their amazing creative output.

Our new site highlights the New Creatives, their disciplines, their work, and their stories.

Visitors to the site can join us and become New Creatives (submissions are made through Behance and curated by our team); we’ll be choosing a number of artists and celebrating them and their work throughout our social properties and on Adobe.com during the coming year.

 

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Be sure to check out the work of the New Creatives, get inspired, and join us.

AJ

Graphic Designer / Executive Creative Director / Maker of things

 

 

 

4:00 PM Permalink

Klip Collective pushes film into new spaces at Sundance

Projection mapping installation relies on Adobe Creative Cloud tools

It almost had to happen. Tom Wait’s spooky spoken word song What’s He Building in There, is so evocative, so “visual” that it’s like film that plays in your mind. The challenge, though, is how to actually make a film that does justice to the genius of the original piece.

Ricardo Rivera, visual artist, filmmaker, and founder of Klip Collective, began exploring video projections when he worked as a club VJ in Philadelphia. “In 1998 I was playing around with Photoshop and discovered how to map images to surfaces,” recalls Rivera. “When After Effects added the ability to preview work through a mini DV connection, I discovered that I could easily play content through a digital projector.” Rivera pointed the projector at a wall in his kitchen and used it to canvas the surfaces. “Then I masked all of the elements in the kitchen using Photoshop and created what was, in effect, a multi-channel projection feed through one projector and one feed.”

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Once Rivera had figured out the workflow, the possibilities were endless. Today Klip Collective holds two patents on projection mapping, a technique whereby video content is projected onto non-traditional display surfaces such as the sides of buildings, often as site-specific art. Different physical surfaces come to life in unexpected ways in a dance of shapes, color, and imagery, melding the permanence of architecture with the transience of light. These are the kinds of new frontiers for art that digital tools make possible.

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3:30 PM Permalink

Adobe Creative Cloud—A Platform for Innovation

In the spring of 2012, we launched Creative Cloud—membership to Adobe’s full range of creative applications—with the belief that it would benefit our customers by giving them access to our tools and services as they’re updated. Since then, more than 1.4 million people have joined Creative Cloud with premium (paid) memberships and millions more have signed up with (free) trial memberships.

Today we’re releasing a major update to Creative Cloud with new features across our core tools—Adobe® Photoshop® CC, Adobe® Illustrator® CC, and Adobe® InDesign® CC—including 3D printing support in Adobe Photoshop CC.

Photoshop CC expands creative possibilities

New 3D printing capabilities in Adobe Photoshop CC tap into the creative and commercial possibilities of 3D printing with the ability to reliably build, refine, preview, prepare and print 3D designs using familiar Photoshop tools. The groundbreaking Perspective Warp feature makes it easy to alter the viewpoint from which an object is seen, and manipulate perspective in an image, while keeping the rest of the image intact.  Linked Smart Objects save time and improve collaboration by enabling objects to be used and updated simultaneously across multiple Photoshop documents.  Learn about all the new features in Photoshop CC.

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Typekit revolutionizes how designers work with type

Now that you can sync fonts from Adobe Typekit to your computer for use in any desktop application, we’ve made updates to Illustrator CC and InDesign CC to make for an even more intuitive integration; for example, InDesign CC will now automatically search the Typekit desktop font library for missing fonts and offer the option to use those fonts, or similar fonts, if it finds a match. Using fonts in your PDFs and print files just got a lot easier. Learn more about Typekit.

Illustrator CC gets powerful new functionality

The latest version of Illustrator CC simplifies creating perfect, editable, rounded corners with the new Live Corners controls; offers more intuitive drawing with the rebuilt Pencil Tool; the ability to quickly modify existing objects and change the view of perspective drawings with Path Segment Reshape and export responsive SVG code and graphics. Learn more about Illustrator CC.

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InDesign CC simplifies ways to add interactivity

InDesign CC includes new support for EPUB 3.0 specification including new ways to add interactivity to eBooks, the ability to add pop-up footnotes that streamline the EPUB reading experience, and support for Japanese Vertical Composition and Hebrew and Arabic text. InDesign also offers simplified hyperlink creation and management. Learn more about InDesign CC.

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Adobe Muse CC gets more engaging

Adobe Muse CC released a set of new features in November 2013 that included scroll effect enhancements that make it easy to create subtle or dramatic scrolling web pages; a new Library panel that stores frequently used design elements; and a dozen new social widgets that make connecting to social media sites, like Facebook and Twitter, a snap. Also added was Adobe Muse Exchange, a community-based exchange where custom widgets and templates can be borrowed and shared. Learn more about Adobe Muse CC or check out How to Create a Website with Adobe Muse to create your first site.

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Get started with Creative Cloud

* If you’re ready to take your skills and creativity in new directions, with applications you’ve never tried before, check out the training videos on Creative Cloud Learn.

* If you’re already a Creative Cloud member, download the updates through the Creative Cloud desktop application.

* If you’re not yet a Creative Cloud member, sign up for a free trial membership for 30-day access to the latest versions of every Adobe creative desktop app.

* If you’ve already tried our Creative Cloud applications for 30 days, and want to try Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, InDesign CC or Muse CC a second time, free, launch the Creative Cloud desktop app and click Update next to the apps you want to try.

See, in more detail, what’s new in Creative Cloud for designers.

9:09 PM Permalink