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Posts in Category "Digital Video & Audio"

Video Production in An Ultra HD World

Adobe Premiere Pro CC and The GoPro CineForm Codec

UltraHD is here to stay as more and more consumers demand content that makes them feel like they are part of an experience. Some analysts think that by the end of 2018, 10% of American households will have 4K capable TVs and by the end of 2024, that number could reach 50%. That means that it’s up to us, as content creators, to start getting comfortable with editing in 4K and 5K—or even 6K—to create Ultra HD content to meet this increasing demand.

The tools we need to shoot, edit and distribute this content are more important than ever. And, because it is not uncommon for a project that just took a few days of shooting to result in one or two terabytes of hard drive space, these big files need powerful software—not to mention bigger hard drives—that can edit the footage without choking.

Compressing Ultra HD with the GoPro CineForm Codec

Although Adobe has been a leader in the ability to edit Ultra HD footage natively within Premiere Pro CC, we realize, when it comes time to working with Ultra HD, that compressing your file format can help your workflow.

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The CineForm codec has been around for a long time and I’ve used it for years. It’s a great finishing codec that provides faster editing without sacrificing image quality. In 2011, GoPro made a camera that supports small formats yet delivers high resolutions. They later acquired CineForm and its codec, known as the GoPro CineForm Codec; with the most recent release of Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, and Adobe Media Encoder CC we’re making it available to you as part of your Creative Cloud subscription.

Learn how the CineForm codec offers Premiere Pro CC users a cross-platform intermediate codec with full support for alpha and large frame sizes of 4K and beyond. We also have an extensive overview on our Premiere Pro CC help website.

On the technical side, the GoPro CineForm codec is a true 12-bit color codec, though it actually has two pixel formats: YUV 4:2:2 at 10 bits per channel, or RGBA 4:4:4:4 at 12 bits per channel. Media Encoder CC will render frames internally at a color depth that may be higher or lower, as appropriate for the incoming source, but it will encode at the true 10-bit or 12-bit color that GoPro CineForm is known for.

It’s interesting to note that the GoPro CineForm Codec has been standardized by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) as the SMPTE ST 2073 VC-5 video compression standard—the new open codec standard for video acquisition and post production.

You can access this codec easily for projects in Premiere Pro CC: From the FILE > EXPORT >MEDIA menu,  select “Quicktime” as the format. We wrap the finished product in a “.mov” wrapper for both Mac and Windows environments, but it still has all the quality and attributes of the GoPro CineForm Codec. Under the VIDEO tab select the codec you want and among the many familiar ones associated with Quicktime, you will find GoPro CineForm Codec listed. You can watch my YouTube video and see exactly how this is done.

It’s important to note that in a Mac environment, the resulting clips have to use Quicktime 7 for playback. In the example I used in my video for a 3-day video shoot, our 1.1 terabyte project was reduced to 43.69 gigabytes! Playback is outstanding and the quality is there.

Also, my colleague, Tim Kurkoski, wrote a blog post for the After Effects blog on GoPro CineFrom code settings.

I hope you enjoy using this excellent codec.

Visit the Creative Cloud video page for more information about all of our post-production products such as Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, and SpeedGrade CC.

10:18 AM Permalink

How The Gone Girl Post-production Team Helped Us Deliver Better Features in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

I’ve been the product manager for Adobe Premiere Pro CC for four years and have never been more excited to work with our product teams and customers than I am now.

Most of you know by now that Premiere Pro CC was used as the exlusive non-linear editing system (NLE) for David Fincher’s Gone Girl—the first Hollywood feature film shot in 6K. While you may already know how Premiere Pro CC helped the Gone Girl team work more efficiently, you likely don’t know how working with the Gone Girl post-production team helped us build a better product.

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At Adobe, we’re committed to making a product that reflects customer feedback and needs, and we love working closely with customers throughout product development cycles. We were offered the opportunity to work with editorial royalty—two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter, ACE, who we knew would push Premiere Pro CC to be an even better NLE. Considering he works with David Fincher, a director notoriously known for pushing technical limits while filmmaking, we felt that getting this right would mean a lot for our product and our users.

So what did we do? We parked our engineers in the same building—just doors away from Kirk, assistant editor Tyler Nelson, and post-production supervisor Peter Mavromates. The engineers lived-and-breathed the movie just like the production team (and I can’t even begin to tell you how proud I was when I saw their names in the credits), working very long days, helping with workflow questions, and fixing issues as they arose.

There were a lot of features that the Gone Girl team helped us create but the top three are Render & Replace, Multi-project Workflows, and Advanced Search in timeline (all of these were recently made public in the October 2014 release of Premiere Pro CC).

Because Gone Girl was super Adobe After Effects CC heavy—a good amount of the timeline was After Effects CC comps—Render & Replace was designed to help the team speed up performance by flattening completed After Effects CC compositions into video clips (in fact the feature was finished too late to be used on the movie, so they used preview renders, but we certainly built it alongside them). Thanks to Dynamic Link, intermediate rendering was eliminated between Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC. The original comps were always accessible if the assistant editor needed to make further changes to a comp, and he could do so while Kirk continued the edit. When the comp was done, it would show up in Kirk’s timeline.

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Multi-project Workflows allowed the Gone Girl team to work concurrently on different parts of the film in different project environments. Kirk Baxter was able to open multiple Media Browser panels for easy access to parts of the project that assistant editors were working on at the same time. The new Source Monitor Timeline—which allows users to open a second timeline for media and sequences from other projects, making it easy to bring existing clips, edits, comps and effects directly into the current project—was suggested by the Gone Girl team and although the feature wasn’t available during the editing of the film, it did make it into the October 2014 release.

We also added the ability to search bins so users can generate dynamic bins based on search criteria. This enabled us to include Advanced Timeline Search capabilities as well. Search bins are updated as new content is added, so users can keep projects organized, even as new footage is still coming in.

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We also added other features such as assignable marker colors and a variety of timeline improvements that helped the team work better and faster. As we built the features for and with the Gone Girl team, we learned more about their incredibly challenging workflow than we ever considered.

All that learning and all those long hours (Thanks guys!) have helped us to build a better product, and we’re so proud of what we achieved with the input from the Gone Girl editorial and post-production team. There were some tough times—we knew there would be—but thanks to the dedicated professionals on their editing team and our engineering team, the project was a huge success, and the first of many more exciting things to come.

Last month, we hosted a panel of the team that worked on Gone Girl. Check out the Behind the Scenes on Gone Girl, which begins with a quick overview of how the tools were used.

10:18 AM Permalink

Really Creative Media: Bringing Events to Life

Media production company, Really Creative Media, uses the integrated software in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams to work with top talent and bring stunning high-tech visuals to live events.

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Today’s biggest events and musical acts entertain audiences from all angles, often combining audio and video for exciting spectacles. With backgrounds in theater and video production, Really Creative Media’s co-founders Nick Dew and Jack James are perfectly suited to oversee events that marry live and virtual experiences. The two directors work with teams of expert designers, animators, technicians, and more to bring visual productions to life.

For Really Creative Media, every project is unique with different requirements. “We primarily work with freelancers, so we can combine the best skillsets for each job,” says Dew. “Working with freelancers enables us to work flexibly, but it also means that we need to invest more time and energy to keep everyone on the same page, encourage collaboration, and deliver consistent results—and Creative Cloud does that for us.”

Working as a team

Adobe creative software forms the core of every step of Really Creative Media’s workflow. Whether working on runway shows, touring musical acts, or movie premieres, Really Creative Media relies on Creative Cloud to produce the videos, animations, and intense visual effects that bring shows to life.

Working with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, Really Creative Media provides its freelancers with access to the latest versions of industry-standard Adobe creative software. “With Creative Cloud for teams, everyone works on the same version, so we don’t need to worry about incompatibilities slowing us down,” says James. The company further enhances collaboration by creating sharable settings and templates that help freelancers adhere to the project requirements.

The Admin Console in Creative Cloud for teams enables Really Creative Media to centralize deployment and manage all licenses from a single location. The company gains visibility into who is using what software, making it easy to reclaim licenses when a project ends and to assign seats to new team members for short-term projects. Once licenses are provided, users can download or update any assigned software without assistance—in the office or on the road.

“To produce truly complementary content for an event, we often need to be on location to fine-tune the timing and effects, so we spend quite a bit of time traveling,” says James. “Previously, we would physically remove hard drives from our work computers and fly them to new locations. With Adobe Creative Cloud, we can log in from a remote computer and sync our work so that we’re accessing the same files, software, and settings that we had in London.”

Backing up a legendary rock band

For a recent project, Really Creative Media supported the world tour of Queen + Adam Lambert with large LED light and video projections.

Queen + Adam Lambert World Tour stage

Queen + Adam Lambert World Tour stage

The creative team used Adobe Illustrator CC for drawing and arraying objects before moving assets into Adobe After Effects CC to prototype visuals, while Adobe Photoshop CC was used to open videos and extract stills and batch TIFF sequences with a specific effect. “With the deep integration among Adobe software applications, edits that we make in Photoshop CC are automatically updated in After Effects CC,” says Dew. “We can spend more time pushing ourselves further creatively and less time exporting files.”

The video portions of the show used significant amounts of archival footage, creating the illusion that legendary Queen vocalist Freddie Mercury was on stage with the rest of the band. “We were working on all types of archival footage—film, tape, you name it,” says Dew. “Adobe Premiere Pro CC supports any file format, so we could just drop footage on the timeline without waiting to transcode hours of video at a time.”

Queen + Adam Lambert World Tour stage with large LED light and video projections

Queen + Adam Lambert World Tour stage with large LED light and video projections

Queen + Adam Lambert World Tour stage with video projections

Queen + Adam Lambert World Tour stage with video projections

Once finalized, Really Creative Media rendered the footage using Adobe Media Encoder CC. Not only did Media Encoder CC render quickly, but it also worked in the background so that creators were able to continue working on the project and make the most out of their time.

Integration and flexibility

Through deep integration with third-party plug-ins and software, including Trapcode and Cinema 4D, especially Cinema 4D integration with After Effects CC, Creative Cloud for teams provides creators with the flexibility to use any specialty programs within the Adobe workflow. In future projects, Really Creative Media looks forward to leveraging the built-in support for 4K resolution footage in Premiere Pro CC to push their presentations visually and provide a better experience for the audience.

“We work with large stage screens, so the ability to work with high resolutions will enable us to deliver sharper and more detailed images for clients,” says Dew. ” Creative Cloud for teams gives us the tools we need to work effectively and push our limits creatively to provide audiences with unforgettable events.”

Read the Really Creative Media case study.

9:53 AM Permalink

New Features, and A Mobile App, for Creative Cloud’s Pro Video Tools

Updated desktop features, born from a collaboration with David Fincher’s Gone Girl team, and Adobe Premiere Clip, a new mobile app.

On Monday, at Adobe MAX 2014, the world’s leading creativity conference, Adobe announced the availability of new and updated free mobile apps, like the all-new Adobe Premiere Clip for iOS, and 2014.1 updates to Creative Cloud applications, including all of the video tools:

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC
Adobe After Effects CC
Adobe SpeedGrade CC
Adobe Prelude CC
Adobe Audition CC
Adobe Media Encoder CC
Adobe Story CC Plus
Adobe Anywhere

Adobe previewed the new video features at IBC 2014 last month. Key themes for the updates include: new project and media management capabilities, such as Search bins and Destination Publishing; support for cutting-edge technologies, like HiDPI Windows 8.1 displays and devices and read/write support for the GoPro CineForm intermediate codec; and more streamlined workflows, including Curves adjustments and a refined new Look workflow in SpeedGrade CC.

Introducing Adobe Premiere Clip

The MAX announcements also included the release of Adobe Premiere Clip, a brand new iOS app that makes it easy to turn footage on an iPhone or iPad into great-looking videos. The app allows users to edit and enhance video with professional looks, effects, and audio. Premiere Clip uses Creative Cloud to automatically sync projects between devices, so that users can shoot whenever they have an opportunity—and edit later when they have time. Users can also move Clip projects into Premiere Pro CC via their Creative Profile, which provides access to their rich desktop toolset.

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“With Premiere Clip we’re making editing a function that is always in your hands. Our goal is to bring the tools to the media,” explained Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “This allows people to ‘just do it’ and start making their own beautiful videos, completely on device, or to use it as a kind of sketchbook for video pros who want to rough out ideas to bring into Premiere Pro.”

Adobe Premiere Clip for iPhone and iPad is available as a free download in the iTunes App Store.

The Influence of Gone Girl

Coinciding with the recent theatrical release of Gone Girl—directed by David Fincher and edited on Premiere Pro CC by Kirk Baxter, ACE—the new updates include a number of features developed in collaboration with Team Fincher. These include larger features, like Multi-project workflows and Advanced Timeline search, workflow enhancements like EDL improvements and Render & Replace, and important details of the UI and workspace refinements, such as ripple label colors and definable marker colors, the way in- and out ranges are displayed.

In Gone Girl Rosamund Pike portrays Amy Dunne, whose mysterious disappearance turns her husband into a possible murder suspect.

“I believe this was the first major Hollywood film shot at 6K so the scope of the project was huge.” said Al Mooney, senior product manager. “We were working with an artistically-driven and incredibly technical team at the top of their game. It was an inspiring experience for us and we’re immensely proud to have been part of it.”

Fully 80 percent of Gone Girl ended up as some form of After Effects CC composition on the final Premiere Pro Timeline for the project. This gave rise to the request for the Render & Replace feature from Team Fincher. Render & Replace ensures fast playback of projects with lots of visual effects by substituting comps with rendered clips—without losing Dynamic Link integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects. “It’s exciting for us to be releasing features for all of our users that have evolved out of a collaboration with one of the best filmmakers in the business,” added Mooney.

 

Along with a significant update to Premiere Pro CC, all of the video tools received enhancements and new features with the 2014.1 release. For more information watch this overview video by Al Mooney.

To learn more about Adobe’s collaboration with David Fincher and his team on Gone Girl, read Gone Girl Marks Yet Another Milestone for Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Learn more about Adobe Premiere Clip and the rest of Adobe’s new and updated mobile apps.

Watch the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote and learn more about all of the great new fall releases.

Pricing and availability

Today’s updates to Creative Cloud are available to Creative Cloud members as part of their membership at no additional cost. To join Creative Cloud, special promotional pricing is available to customers who own Adobe Creative Suite 3 or later and membership plans are available for individuals, students, photographers, teams, educational institutions, government agencies and enterprises.

10:36 AM Permalink

Gone Girl Marks Yet Another Milestone for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

David Fincher crafts a thriller with a talented team of artists and Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

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If the first film review in Variety is any indication, Director David Fincher’s film adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestselling novel Gone Girl will be well worth the price of admission. Many filmgoers will see the movie because they like the actors, the genre, or because they’ve read the book. Many others will go because they love Fincher’s vigorous storytelling, his impeccable pacing, and his striking visual style.

Whether the audience is conscious of it or not, it is Fincher’s careful structuring of narrative and imagery that makes his films so powerful. Gone Girl is the first Hollywood feature-length film cut entirely in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Fincher is a director known for pushing technology to the edge. To help realize his ambitious vision for Gone Girl, he shot the film with a RED Dragon camera in 6K and assembled a top-notch post-production team. Two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter, ACE, edited the film with help from an editorial department that included Tyler Nelson, his long-time assistant editor. Peter Mavromates worked as post-production supervisor, while Jeff Brue of Open Drives was the post-production engineer. Fincher had worked with the group before, but the decision to use an integrated Adobe workflow with Adobe Premiere Pro CC at the hub, was a first for the tech-savvy director.

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After successfully cutting a Calvin Klein commercial with Premiere Pro CC, the team set out to determine what it would take to support the demands of a two-and-a-half hour feature film using the same Adobe workflow. Brue was tasked with designing the storage system that would enable Premiere Pro  to work smoothly within a demanding 6K production pipeline.

“Our goal was to get as many iterations as possible of the opticals and visual effects in a given period of time to make the story as strong as we could,” explains Brue. “The ask was for nothing less than perfection, which pushed us to do better. When it came down to it, Adobe Premiere Pro CC was faster than anything else in the market. That speed meant more iterations, more time to work on a shot, and more time to perfect an edit.”


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Having worked on previous Fincher projects, Mavromates comfortably assumed the role of managing the pipeline, helping determine the post-production goals, and guiding the visual effects work. With a plan in place, Baxter got started on the edit, working closely with Fincher and relying on Nelson and others on the editorial team to navigate the technicalities of working on such a cutting-edge pipeline.

“Working with the Adobe engineers was probably the best development experience I’ve ever had,” says Nelson. “Everybody was in tune with what was going on and we always had this amazingly collaborative environment. It wasn’t just about making our movie the best movie it could be, we wanted to make every movie cut on Premiere Pro in the future the best movie it could be.”

Fincher shot in 6K with multiple takes, giving the team plenty of material to work with. With a gift for bringing out the best in everyone on a project, it would be easy to assume that the film is comprised of only “perfect takes.” In fact, 80% of the shots were enhanced in some way, from reframing and stabilization to split-screening to remove an extra breath.

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The result, after a lot of meticulous detail work, is a film where every shot seems flawless. As the Variety review says, “…editor Kirk Baxter cuts the picture to within an inch of its life while still allowing individual scenes and the overall structure to breathe…”

“On every film we face the challenge of reducing the screen time without losing content,” says Baxter. “If we don’t have to cut out lines, but instead remove time from a scene by making invisible edits, that’s a win. The way David overshoots the frame in his films allows me to edit within the shot, then I throw it to the guys to sew together in After Effects, make it spotless, and stabilize the shot. That way David can judge the shots by the performance and delivery, rather than making comments on the technical aspects.”

Much of the visual effects work was done in-house, which allowed the team to work iteratively, in parallel with the editing. For example, Baxter could edit in Premiere Pro while others worked on shots in After Effects. The saved compositions would automatically update in Baxter’s timeline thanks to Adobe Dynamic Link. This integrated and interactive workflow kept shots looking cleaner and eliminated distracting back-and-forth discussions so the entire team could focus on the story as it took shape in the edit bay. This streamlined workflow was one of the main advantages for “Team Fincher.”

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“On Gone Girl we managed to do a huge number of effects shots, probably more than 200, in house thanks to the tight integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects,” says Mavromates. “I don’t think the average viewer will think of Gone Girl as a visual effects movie. However, when you look closely at David’s movies he is playing little visual tricks and we are doing brass polishing on a significant number of shots.”

This talented group of self-described perfectionists, supported by a gifted and driven post-production team, put the Adobe video workflow through its most rigorous use case to date with great success. Now, with the hard work behind them, they can sit back and watch their months of work unfold for theater audiences around the world.

Check the Adobe Premiere Pro blog next week for in-depth interviews with Kirk Baxter, Tyler Nelson, Peter Mavromates, and Jeff Brue about their work on Gone Girl.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud.

11:09 AM Permalink

The Technological Artistry of Obscura Digital

This creative technology studio designs high-impact displays and improves software management with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

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Investing in multidimensional experiences

Combining innovative technology with unique creative expression, Obscura Digital designs and develops immersive and interactive experiences for events worldwide. Unlike traditional digital agencies that focus on works for print or screen, Obscura specializes in interactive installations, engaging stage shows, and mapping video that turns nearly any surface—from an outdoor sculpture to an entire building—into a video screen.

“We focus on nontraditional mediums and work with people from a wide variety of backgrounds: musicians, artists, and technicians,” says Barry Threw, director of software at Obscura Digital.

For the grand re-opening of the San Francisco Exploratorium, a unique museum dedicated to science, art, and human perception, Obscura manufactured a series of miniature replicas of the building’s façade to capture unique video, including fluid dynamics, microorganisms, and living systems in high-definition, time-lapse video. At the opening, Obscura seamlessly mapped the video onto the front of the building.

The grand re-opening event for San Francisco's Exploratorium.

The grand re-opening event for San Francisco’s Exploratorium.

“When we work with such large canvases, we need to start with ultra-high resolution images,” notes Threw. “Adobe creative software is not only an industry standard, it efficiently handles high-resolution outputs when other software can’t.”

Obscura used Adobe Premiere Pro to create and quickly edit proxy footage, and switched to Adobe After Effects for color correction, transitional moments, speed ramping, and master outputs. Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop were used for template creation and image cleanup, while Adobe Bridge assisted with overall file management and metadata annotation.

Delivering agility

Obscura, part of the Society of Digital Agencies (SoDA) and an Adobe agency partner, recently purchased Creative Cloud for teams through Adobe.com. “We’ll often bring someone in on short notice to create or revise assets as client specifications shift,” says Threw. “With access to the full collection of creative apps, Adobe Creative Cloud for teams supports greater scalability and enables us to change creative direction or take work wherever it needs to go—something we couldn’t do as easily before and respond to client needs almost instantly, right in the field.”

Obscura Digital's mapped architectural projection stage set for the Beats Antique “A Thousand Faces."

Obscura Digital’s mapped architectural projection is part of a stage set for the Beats Antique “A Thousand Faces” tour.

Centralizing license management simplifies administration, making it easy for Obscura to redistribute licenses as they are needed for various projects. “With Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, we can manage licenses very easily through the Admin Console,” says Vlad Spears, a technologist at Obscura Digital. “We always know who has what software, so we can adjust assignments as needed across project teams and contractors.”

Creative Cloud for teams also puts users in charge of software updates and installations, further reducing the workload for IT. Since teams often work in the field to help bring exhibit installations to life, this easy-to-manage self-service model enables users to add secondary installations of the Creative Cloud apps to home computers or laptops.

Obscura Digital's elaborate projections illuminate the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi.

Obscura Digital’s elaborate projections illuminate the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi.

“If someone is working on the road and suddenly realizes that they need another application, they can use their existing Creative Cloud membership to install the applications themselves without IT scrambling to provide them additional installers or serial numbers,” says Spears. “The flexibility we have in managing licenses now with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams is light years better than what we were doing before.” Obscura plans to expand use of Creative Cloud for teams with more licenses purchased through Adobe.com.

“Our purchase of Adobe Creative Cloud for teams via Adobe.com was extremely smooth,” says Spears. “And, by working with our annual membership on a monthly basis, our finance group has a much easier time forecasting costs and building budgets. We are thrilled to be on this new path with Adobe.”

Read the Obscura Digital case study.

2:30 PM Permalink

Adobe Theatre: Our Outstanding Lineup at IBC

Presentations by an impressive group of Adobe pro video users signal a promising event.

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This Friday, IBC 2014 will kick off in Amsterdam and Adobe will be there previewing the updates coming soon to Creative Cloud’s pro video tools. In addition to Adobe presentations on our video and audio applications, we’ll also have a five-day lineup of our top customers sharing their workflows, tips and tricks.

Pulling off the broadcast of the largest sports event on earth, The World Cup, is no small task. HBS will feature its workflow, its use of Creative Cloud, and the well-integrated partners used, like EVS, to produce this amazing event.

Swiss Radio and Television (SRF) gave us the chance to witness magic moments of incredible artistry and athleticism performed by the athletes competing at the Sochi Games. For video content, like their stunning Sochi opener, SRF used Adobe SpeedGrade CC to give content from different sources a uniform look, and switched to Adobe Premiere Pro CC as their main editing tool, which replaced Final Cut Pro. Simone Nucci and Simon Renfer share their incredible work starting the Sunday of IBC.

Red Bull is not just a brand that sells energy drinks—it is also a multi-platform media company that produces premium sports, culture, and lifestyle content with help from Creative Cloud and Premiere Pro CC. The well-known international brand has expanded into streaming video through Red Bull TV, an independent music label, and sponsored dozens of athletes, teams, and events. Red Bull Media House’s Andreas Gall, will share how the team users Creative Cloud to give the company the wings to connect people with the international Red Bull brand.

Veteran filmmaker Philip Bloom will share his unique approach to documentary filmmaking using Creative Cloud with Premiere Pro CC at the hub. His outspoken approach to low-budget video creation and whole-hearted embrace of social media has helped hobbyists as well as experienced professionals shoot better video.

The United Kingdom’s Karrot Animation has become a recognized industry leader, producing 2D-animated shows including the international hit Sarah & Duck. Karrot co-founder Jamie Badminton will be presenting the studio’s use of Creative Cloud in the making of the series.

Bryn Balcombe, technology director for London Live, will share how the new UK station’s broadcast and production infrastructure’s use of Creative Cloud supports the fast-paced production and distribution of standard-definition television over the air and high-definition television on any device.

ITV Studios shares how it has modernized its approach to broadcast productions and highlights its use of Adobe Story CC Plus and Premiere Pro CC through Creative Cloud to produce the UK’s well-known serial dramas, Coronation Street and Emmerdale.

With blockbuster films such as Godzilla, the Harry Potter franchise, and Life of Pi, and advertising campaigns for global brands including Samsung, Ikea, and Visa, you can see why MPC is one of the world’s leading visual effects and motion graphics studios. William MacNeil will feature the studio’s stunning work and explain how Creative Cloud is used to craft their most compelling visual experiences.

Ending the line up is one of our favorite game-developers and games, Angry Birds. Rovio animation director Jussi-Petteri Kemppainen and pipeline and tools developer Pauli Suuraho will share how they created the first season of Angry Birds Toons, which can be viewed on the company’s multiplatform video channel, ToonsTV. You’ll also see how they used Adobe After Effects CC and Photoshop CC to do 3D-like rigging to build one of the world’s must popular games.

If you’ll be attending IBC, check our Booth Schedule to see the presentations live, and stay tuned to the Pro Video playlist on the Adobe Creative Cloud YouTube channel (we’ll share the recorded video presentations in an upcoming blog post after the show ends).

Read more about the top new features and enhancements being revealed at IBC, and for more in-depth information, visit the product blogs for Premiere Pro CCAfter Effects CC, SpeedGrade CCPrelude CCMedia Encoder CCAudition CC, and Adobe Story.

11:28 AM Permalink

IBC 2014: What’s Coming Next to Creative Cloud for Video

Streamline video workflows with industry-leading integration

This month at IBC 2014 in Amsterdam, Adobe will preview the updates coming soon to Creative Cloud’s pro video applications. In a fast-moving industry, video pros need tools that keep them ahead of the curve, allowing them to work confidently with the latest hardware and camera formats. With regular updates, Creative Cloud meets that need, making everyday tasks faster and easier—and opens new creative possibilities with a little more Adobe magic.

  • Powerful media and project management—Take control of large projects with new features like Search bins, Consolidate & Transcode, and Multi-project workflows in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.
  • Support for cutting-edge technologies—Focus on the content with a refreshed user-interface across all of the video applications, including HiDPI support for Windows 8.1 and Mac Retina displays.
  • Streamlined workflows—Complete everyday tasks more efficiently, thanks to new tools and refinements, such as Curve adjustments and hover preview Looks in Adobe SpeedGrade CC.

After a successful run using Premiere Pro CC to edit David Fincher’s upcoming thriller Gone Girl, two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter has made Premiere Pro CC the NLE of choice for his new company, EXILE. “I’m happy to see so many of the new features we asked Adobe for during Gone Girl in the upcoming release.” —Kirk Baxter, ACE

This post provides an overview of the upcoming video releases, including many of the top features and enhancements. For more in-depth information, visit the product blogs for Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe SpeedGrade CC, Adobe Prelude CC, Adobe Media Encoder CC, Adobe Audition CC, and Adobe Story Plus CC.

Updated user interface

All of the Creative Cloud video applications have been given gentle facelifts, using a more subtle color scheme and simplified UI elements.

“The first thing you’ll notice when you open them, is the cleaner look to all of the video apps,” said Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “We’ve modernized and simplified the user interface so that it doesn’t compete with the content. The point is to allow video pros to focus more on their content, and less on the widgets.”

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In addition to the UI refinements, the video apps have all been updated to work with HiDPI displays, including Mac OSX and Windows 8.1 devices. “We foresee a day when video professionals will be creating and interacting with their content in a variety of ways across a variety of devices. Our goal is to support this transition as it evolves and this UI refresh lays the foundation for that,” added Roberts.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC

New Search bins allow users to automatically generate dynamic bins based on search criteria, including new Advanced Timeline Search capabilities. Search bins update as new content is added to a project, so users can keep projects organized, even as new footage is still coming in.

Consolidate & Transcode allows users to move all relevant files in projects and sequences to reduce the overall project size. Once the setting is selected in the Project Manager panel, all content is rendered into a single codec and a compact new project file is created.

Multi-project workflows allow editors to bring everything they need into one workspace. Users can open multiple Media Browser panels for easy access to as many projects as needed. The new Source Monitor Timeline view opens a second Timeline for media and sequences from other projects, making it easy to bring existing clips, edits, transitions, or graphics directly into your current project.

Premiere Pro CC now offers full support for reading and encoding GoPro CineForm, an easily managed, cross-platform intermediate codec, ideal for high resolution footage. And the Premiere Pro CC engineers keep finding ways to get more out of the GPU with native support for 4K, 5K, 6K (and higher) content, including new GPU-based deBayering for AJA RAW, Canon RAW, and Phantom Cine, as well as RED and Cinema DNG footage.

Existing features see some significant new capabilities, too, like enhanced Masking & Tracking, that enables users to adjust feathering directly in the Program Monitor, or use the free-draw polygon tool to create complex mask shapes. Use Render & Replace to speed up performance of VFX-heavy sequences by flattening After Effects CC compositions into video clips—and thanks to Dynamic Link, the original comps are always accessible if you need to make further changes. Improved Master Clip effects, Send to Audition, and AAF export to DAWs, are just a few other enhancements coming to Premiere Pro CC this Fall.

“This is a packed release for Premiere Pro CC with some really nice additions to existing features, but our big focus here was on creating easier workflows for large projects,” said Al Mooney, product manager for Premiere Pro CC. “Consolidate & Transcode, for example, is perfect for facilities who need to trim down large projects. It makes it easy to pass work on to other teams, or to archive editable projects which are still reasonably-sized.”

Adobe After Effects CC

The next release of After Effects CC offers an enhanced Live 3D Pipeline, adding Cineware 2.0 and CINEMA 4D R16 compatibility, so that artists can work faster and more easily with 3D elements in their compositions. Broadcasters and large facilities that use Adobe Anywhere for video will benefit from improved Anywhere collaboration to streamline remote workflows with version tracking and project sharing. In addition, the new version offers a number of usability refinements, such as more visible anchor points on layers, tracking behavior improvements, and more incremental improvements that make motion graphics and visual effects work easier and more efficient.

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“We’re really excited about where we’re going with After Effects CC” said Steve Forde, principal product manager. “A special highlight of our 2014 releases is the deeper integration with Premiere Pro CC and Anywhere for video. This is a great example of how we are streamlining workflows for motion graphics and visual effects artists—and enabling collaboration between teams.

Adobe SpeedGrade CC

The next release of SpeedGrade CC is focused squarely on the creative tools, including a significantly enhanced Looks workflow, Curve adjustments and awesome new Grading Layer Grouping capabilities.

Working with Looks in SpeedGrade CC has never been easier: Hover to preview Looks in the main image Monitor, and click to apply. Looks can be dragged into the grading layer stack where they will immediately appear as a new Grading Layer Group, making it easy to combine existing Looks and LUTs; just adjust the opacity of each group to get the result you want and… Voila! A real “Look mixer.” It’s also possible to create your own Grading Layer Groups, or copy and paste selected grading layers to apply them to new clips or save as new Looks.

SpeedGrade CC now offers Curve adjustments, including RGB curves familiar to Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Lightroom users, as well as Hue & Saturation curves, which allow you to boost or mute parts of the color spectrum. Use Curve grading layers on their own or in tandem with the other SpeedGrade CC color correction tools.

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Improvements to existing features include audio support for Premiere Pro CC projects in Direct Link, faster tracking, better Autosave, improved performance with masks, and Enhanced Mercury Transmit, providing 4K output for 4K monitors and new support for Blackmagic video cards.

Adobe Prelude CC

Log metadata while an event is unfolding in front of you. Use keyboard shortcuts on your laptop together with your custom tags to prepare content efficiently—and without typos. Deliver media that gives your editor a running start for a faster turnaround in post-production. Add In and Out points more efficiently and apply transitions across clips in the Rough Cut timeline. Replace, or augment, camera audio with new support for multiple audio tracks.

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Adobe Media Encoder CC

Render and deliver your work in one fell swoop with Destination Publishing: Add preset options for FTP sites, or your Creative Cloud folder. Send to multiple locations and track rendering and upload in the same panel. With new Watch Folder support for projects, you can automate transcoding of all of your project files at once by dragging Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, or Final Cut Pro XML projects into Watch Folders. Mux during encode for faster rendering of MPEG2 files with audio. Extended Match Source support now includes QuickTime and DNxHD formats.

Adobe Audition CC

Open virtually any video format, including RED, XDCAM, MXF, and others. Video files now load faster and play more smoothly. Minimize background noises while amplifying and leveling speech with a powerful new Target Dynamic Range parameter providing even better volume leveling for spoken content. Read and add notes to audio files with iXML metadata support, including information such as Scene, Take, or time code formats.

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Adobe Story Plus CC

Screenwriters and writing teams can now Customize text boxes so that notes and comments stand out. Fine tune production planning and assign numbers to camera shots to align with scene order.

Adobe Anywhere

Adobe Anywhere for video adds robust collaboration support for After Effects CC users and brings refinements to the Adobe Anywhere app for iPad, including new scrubbing gestures and sorting options. A new streaming API allows facilities and broadcasters to integrate content from Adobe Anywhere into a variety of user experiences on the web or mobile devices.

“We’re excited to be showing another strong release at IBC 2014,” said Bill Roberts. “Constant refinements across all of our applications mean we’re always improving the tools, integration, and collaboration. The demands on video pros keep growing and our efforts are empowering our users to deliver better work, faster and more efficiently than ever.”

Availability

These updates to the Creative Cloud video apps and Adobe Anywhere for video are expected to be available in the coming weeks.

We’ll share even more amazing innovation coming to Creative Cloud—across desktop, mobile, services and community—at Adobe MAX, The Creativity Conference, October 4–8 in Los Angeles. To be among the first to know when these and other Creative Cloud updates are available, follow Creative Cloud on Twitter and Facebook.

Visit the Creative Cloud video page for links and news from Adobe at IBC 2014 from September 12–17. And if you can’t make it to IBC, please join us for a special, live from Amsterdam, Ask a Video Pro session on Friday, September 12 at 10:00am PT (7:00pm CEST) when Jason Levine will introduce the new features coming to the CC video apps.

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Learn Something New: The Latest Creative Cloud Tutorials

Creative Cloud Learn has hundreds of tutorials that help members get started, grasp essentials, learn how to use new applications, and take full advantage of a Creative Cloud membership.

This week the Learn team’s new tutorial content focuses (primarily) on the new features in Adobe Muse CC and helping experienced video professionals make the switch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC:

Switch to Premiere Pro CC

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Switch from Final Cut Pro. In this 20-minute tutorial, learn the simple XML workflow for exporting projects from Final Cut Pro and importing them into Premiere Pro CC.

Latest tips for quick video editing. Learn the latest workflow shortcuts, file performance enhancements, scrubbing tricks, and dozens of tips that improve and quicken the video editing experience in Premiere Pro CC.

Export a Digital Cinema Package. Learn how to export a Digital Cinema Package (DCP), an industry-standard collection of digital files, directly from the timeline in Premiere Pro CC.

Work with text in Adobe Muse

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Add self-hosted web fonts. Because no one can ever have too many typefaces, Adobe Muse CC just made it easier to use the fonts you already own: In this five-minute video, learn to add web fonts, licensed and downloaded from font foundries or services, to your Adobe Muse font menu.

Bullets and number lists. In this four-minute video, learn how to use the new Bullet, Bullet Styles, and Glyphs panels to easily add great-looking customized bulleted and numbered lists to website designs.

And a couple of extras

Access Creative Cloud Market design assets. Learn how to access and use Creative Cloud Market’s treasure trove of vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and for-placement images in design and web development projects.

Make selections based on focus. A three-minute how-to about making selections based on depth-of-field using Photoshop CC’s time-saving Focus Mask feature.

9:59 AM Permalink

Adobe Premiere Pro CC and The Evolution of The NLE

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An interview with Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney.

Al Mooney, senior product manager for Premiere Pro CC, has a long history in digital video editing and has played his part in the evolution of the NLE. Mooney grew up in the Southwest of England and studied music and sound recording at the University of Surrey. Starting out as a broadcast engineer, he went on to work for Digidesign (part of Avid Technology) and then Apple in the UK in sales and business development work. Mooney has been product manager of Premiere Pro since 2010.

With the launch of the 2014 versions of the Creative Cloud applications, I sat down with Al to talk about video editing and the past, present, and future of Premiere Pro CC.

How did you get into the world of film and broadcast production?
The original plan was to be an audio engineer in music. I studied audio engineering and, as part of my degree, worked a year for a German broadcaster as a sound designer. While there, it became pretty obvious that working in recording studios wasn’t for me—in part because I quite like things like daylight and eating. So when I finished my studies I went to work as a music product specialist at Digidesign. My interests evolved from there: I first got excited about audio for pictures, and then pictures themselves.

You’ve been the Premiere Pro product manager since CS 5.5. What were your objectives for the application when you were overseeing that release?
It was pretty clear to me—and I don’t think I was alone in this—that we had a great engine but a pretty ugly car. I wanted to make driving Premiere Pro delightful; I wanted to make people swoon when they looked at it.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney takes to the stage at 2013 NAB Supermeet. (Photo courtesy PF Bentley.)

Adobe Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney takes to the stage at 2013 NAB Supermeet. (Photo courtesy PF Bentley.)

Where are we today in the evolution of the NLE?
In terms of professionals, there are a number of big themes we’re seeing. More and more editors need to work with higher-resolution footage, most notably 4K but sometimes higher than that. Editors expect to be able to sit in front of their NLE and cut 4K, or even 5K, just like they do with SD or HD. And they should be able to do that! Making it work should be our problem, not theirs. Whenever an editor has to think about the technology, rather than the creative task, I think we’ve failed.

Another interesting theme is color, which has become such an important part of the entire workflow, and no longer something that people just think about at the end. Editors expect to be able to work creatively with color from the very beginning of the process.

Aside from the needs of established professionals, there’s also a whole new group of people becoming creative with video who aren’t necessarily using NLE software to do it. I think the way people express themselves with software like Vine and Instagram is fascinating. So while I think there will always be a place for high-end, deep video editing apps, we’re seeing exciting changes in the way people use video in general.

Where do you see the 2014 release of Premiere Pro CC in terms of that bigger picture?
We’ve been focusing on higher resolution workflows for a very long time, and we make improvements every release. Alongside new format support, we’re always working on providing our customers with the best performance possible. Like I said, editors expect to be able to cut 4K just like they can HD, and the addition of the GPU debayer for RED media enables editors to cut RED incredibly fluidly.

In terms of color, we also made big improvements to Direct Link, which allows editors to dip into a powerful grading application at any point during the edit, without relinking or exporting anything. You can just open the project in SpeedGrade CC and work with it. I’m really proud of what we did with that workflow.

Al presenting Adobe SpeedGrade CC at the 2013 NAB Supermeet.

Al presenting Adobe SpeedGrade CC at the 2013 NAB Supermeet.

There’s been a lot of talk about the tighter integration with After Effects CC with new features like Live Text templates and Masking and Tracking. Why was this important?
We care a great deal about listening to and engaging with editors, and we heard loud and clear that there are certain effects-related tasks that editors often need to do many times a day. The Dynamic Link workflow between After Effects CC and Premiere Pro CC is extremely powerful but for things you need to do often and quickly it can be too much effort to go back and forth between applications. It wastes time and takes you out of the “editing mindset.” Also not every editor knows their way around After Effects CC. Editing text in AE comps is something many editors wanted to be able to do in the NLE. And it’s the same with masking and tracking—we heard that blurring of faces and license plates was hugely important, so that’s what we focused on.

I’m hugely proud of the way our engineers built Masking and Tracking into Premiere Pro CC. While we knew that blurring was crucial, our teams put the new functionality at the core of our effects engine so that the feature is capable of so much more than just blurring things out.

Masking and Tracking, powered by After Effects CC, was introduced in the 2014 release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Masking and Tracking, powered by After Effects CC, was introduced in the 2014 release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Are there any other features in the 2014 release that you are excited about?
I think the ability to have multiple Media Browser panels might be one of the best sleeper features. You can have as many as you need, browsing to your media directories, or, perhaps even more usefully, browsing to different projects. It’s a bit like having the Project Panel of another project open in a Media Browser, and as such you start to see a pretty powerful multiple project workflow. We also added Favorites to the Media Browser which I think a lot of people will find very helpful.

What are some of the other highlights for you in the most recent release of the Adobe video applications?
I mentioned improved Direct Link and I think that’s a huge feature for editors. I want them to be really comfortable in SpeedGrade CC and it’s really getting to a stage where SpeedGrade feels like an extension of Premiere Pro. Also I’d be crazy not to point out the spill suppressor technology in After Effects CC, which has caused many jaws to hit the floor during demos.

From a product development point of view, what do you think of Creative Cloud so far?
It’s so much fun, to be honest! This is really about the evolution of software itself. Changes come so fast these days and Creative Cloud gives us a framework to continually develop the tools, rather than being limited to a rigid twelve- or eighteen-month schedule. Now we can release features when they’re ready—and when our users need them.

How do you feel the Creative Cloud model has worked for users?
Professional users need tools that keep up with their world. In a fast moving industry, the Creative Cloud model has been an ideal fit for Premiere Pro—well all our video apps, really. Creative Cloud brings us much closer to our customers and product development is closely tied to user feedback. It’s much more of a partnership now with a lot more ongoing contact than we used to have.

Overall Creative Cloud membership is growing faster than we expected. Video pros in particular have been upgrading to Creative Cloud at an incredible rate. I’m really proud of that.

You’ve had plenty of personal experience with competing NLEs. Why should users consider switching to Premiere Pro CC now?
There are so many reasons! Our industry-leading native format support. Our amazing integration with other Adobe apps like Photoshop CC, After Effects CC, SpeedGrade CC. Our rich, diverse third-party ecosystem. Our speed of innovation. My cat. The list goes on!

Al often jokes about his beloved cat Cloud (yes, that’s her real name) and is famous for wearing cat T-shirts during presentations.

Al often jokes about his beloved cat Cloud (yes, that’s his real name) and is famous for wearing cat T-shirts during presentations.

What do you love most about your work now?
I love how engaged we are with the community. I adore speaking at user group events, showing off what we’ve been working on and gathering feedback from editors. I also have to call out the amazing team I work with—the amount of skill and knowledge in the Premiere Pro team is mind boggling. I’m so lucky to be part of this group of people.

Where do you hope to take Premiere Pro CC in the future?
To infinity and beyond! I want this product to be synonymous with video production. I’m jealous that Photoshop has become a verb—I want people to say, “I Premiere Pro’d it!”

Get a free trial of Premiere Pro CC


11:51 AM Permalink