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HaZ Goes Hollywood with Sci-Fi Teasers

Turning proof-of-concept shorts into feature film deals with Adobe Creative Cloud.

HaZ_1Soon after its release, Project Kronos was an Internet hit on YouTube and Vimeo. Viewers loved the gritty documentary feel of the fifteen-minute short created on a budget of just £3000 by Hasraf “HaZ” Dulull entirely with Adobe Creative Cloud applications, including Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC. Hollywood loved it, too. So much so, that HaZ was able to win his first feature film deal for a full-length version of the space exploration drama.

Hollywood is a long way from the buzzing streets of central London where HaZ grew up. As a boy, his interest in cinema was first piqued by VHS videos of Blade Runner and Alien. Fascinated by the special effects, the youngster carefully reviewed scenes, trying to discern how they were created. Meanwhile in school he started playing around with an early version of the Paint application. “The school computers wouldn’t let you save files, so day after day I would create the same image, improving it as I went along,” he recalls. “I got pretty good at pushing pixels that way.”

At sixteen, he got his first computer and was soon a keen gamer. His interest in pursuing a career in game design led him to choose Computer Science, Technology, and Design for his A Level exam subjects. As part of his schoolwork, he created and animated a film using 4-bit images. From there HaZ went on to study media communications and for his dissertation on video games he created a simple horror game.

From game cinematics to cinema

That helped him land his first video game job creating cinematics, the short films that serve as introductions to video game narratives and as “cut scenes” between levels. “By now I was working with the first wave of digital tools, including Alias Wavefront for animation, Photoshop for painting, Combustion for compositing, and Avid for editing,” says HaZ.

HaZ_2_ProjectKronos

“After a few years, I asked myself: ‘Why am I doing this?’ Why not work on actual films,” he continues. “So I got my first film job at the Moving Picture Company in London.” Starting in 2003, he worked his way up from compositor to lead compositor, finally becoming VFX supervisor on broadcast series such as America: The Story of US (History Channel) and Planet Dinosaurs (BBC), both of which earned him award nominations in 2011.

As a VFX supervisor he was soon working shoulder to shoulder with directors. “That became my film school,” he says. “I was helping filmmakers plan their productions in a way that avoided problems in post-production. This didn’t just teach me about the process of filmmaking, it deepened my understanding of storytelling and how each aspect of a film, if done right, supports the larger narrative.”

The role of VFX supervisor is an interesting one and tells us a lot about the evolution of filmmaking today. Originally, the VFX supervisor was brought on set to bridge the gap between filming and post production. They ensured that shots were captured correctly for efficient post-production and high-quality visual effects. Sometimes VFX supervisors even directed segments themselves. But the role has grown as the place for visual effects in filmmaking has matured. “As a VFX supervisor, I’m working with writers actors, directors, producers, executives,” says HaZ. “We’ve become very influential in the storytelling process and we’re usually brought in now during development, before the script is even green lit.”

Pitching feature films in Hollywood

Meanwhile, HaZ himself was also evolving and the idea for Project Kronos was born. “Project Kronos was the right thing at the right time,” he explains. “Gravity was hitting theaters and Interstellar was in production. Space stories were hot.” Project Kronos was picked up by Armory Films and Benderspink to turn into a full-length drama with HaZ attached to write and direct. All of a sudden, he was being asked to pitch ideas for other films.

HaZ_3_ProjectKronos

“Now I go into the meetings as a director and a writer,” he says, “and I don’t just bring a script with storyboards. I cut a short teaser of the film to show the studio execs what the film will look like. And I’m not just showing them the story, I’m showing them how it can be made.”

The approach has worked. In short order HaZ had three films in development with a fourth in the works. “It really helps that I can knock out the videos fast,” he explains. “Once I even cut a pitch trailer on the plane, on the way to Los Angeles. It’s so easy now: boot up the laptop, open the Creative Cloud apps and just get to work.”

The process itself is not new to him, just the ease with which he can do it. “I’ve been doing proof of concept stuff for a long time, but it used to be with disconnected tools,” he says. “With Creative Cloud I don’t have to deal with that anymore. I just bring everything into Premiere Pro CC and then connect the pieces. It makes it so much easier to sell an idea when you can show it already visualized.”

Building pitch trailers with Creative Cloud

One of the new projects is called Sync. Unlike Project Kronos, which is styled like a documentary, Sync is a sci-fi thriller. “I wanted to show I could create the kinds of action films that studios are often looking for from young first-time filmmakers,” he says.

HaZ_4_Sync01

He even created a kind of pre-teaser to show potential collaborators what he wanted to make, including grading with Adobe SpeedGrade CC, to create atmosphere, and VFX created in Photoshop CC and After Effects CC. “That worked,” he smiles. “My test shots generated interest and I found my crew and actors just by showing it around.”

While shooting the Sync teaser, HaZ and his team were already doing rough assembly, which was easy, since Premiere Pro CC supports the native files right out of the camera. From there the short film was built stem-to-stern in Creative Cloud. “Adobe isn’t just creating tools, they’re creating workflows,” says HaZ. He is proud of this project, which he feels includes elements of Blade Runner, one of his first movie loves.

I.R.I.S, a third feature film project, combines the documentary storytelling style of Project Kronos with the sci-fi thriller genre of Sync. In this story, the globe is surrounded by miniature drones which, using sophisticated artificial intelligence, monitor and police human activity.

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I.R.I.S. was created using the same workflow as Project Kronos and Sync. As with those shorts, HaZ made extensive use of After Effects CC for compositing CG elements into the live action, as well as augmenting stock footage. HaZ created I.R.I.S. before Sync but it was released afterwards. “It was a project I developed with another production company in Los Angeles to pitch as a feature film,” explains HaZ. “We never intended to release this one as a short film, but after all the buzz around Sync it made sense to make this public, too.

“I asked my DP on I.R.I.S. if he could find some guys who could help out as marines in the film. When I turned up on set these guys were fully kitted out with enough weaponry to start a small war—all replicas of course! They were awesome to work with and totally loved films like Aliens, so directing them was a blast. Naturally, I used them again on Sync for much bigger action scenes.”

A playground for developing ideas

As all of these short film projects show, Creative Cloud gives HaZ a digital playground for developing ideas. The result in each case is not just a story idea, but clear ideas for how to make it efficiently and cost-effectively. For example, HaZ has made extensive use of Adobe Audition CC to map out audio for his projects. “Sound studio time is really expensive, so it helps a lot if I can show exactly how I want the audio to be done, and the audio people end up using many of the original sound elements I created,” says HaZ. “And I’m not even an audio guy!”

The design tools have also proven useful in fleshing out concepts. “For one project I was asked how I thought it could be marketed, so I grabbed some stills and designed a poster for the film,” he says. “Typekit is a lifesaver for me, too—not just for making posters, but for titling and design elements within the films. I also used Creative Cloud Assets to create graphics in Sync. I don’t want to be thinking about tools when I’m doing my work. Everything I need I already have in Creative Cloud.”

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After a year of polishing the script, HaZ is now gearing up for his feature film directorial debut on Project Kronos, which will go into production in 2015. While this will bring new experiences, he feels very much at home in the process. “I don’t need to worry about post, or editorial, because I know I have all the tools to get the job done.
 

In case you missed it… from October 2013, Creating a Great Pitch Trailer for your Feature Film, an Ask A Pro session with HaZ Dullul.

(HaZ is represented by manager Scott Glassgold of IAM Entertainment.)

3:10 PM Permalink

Between Failure and Success

The third installment of I Went to Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015… And all I brought back is a series of blog posts, the firsthand account of a first-time Adobe SXSW Creative Camp attendee.

Failure as a Creative Catalyst with Erik Natzke

“Anyone here who has not failed as a creative, raise your hand, stand up, and walk out the door. Because THAT is not how creativity is born. Creativity is born through struggle, through strife, through what happens every day when someone decides, ‘I’m gonna go try this.'”

Over the next hour Erik walked the audience through his career, and its portfolio of projects, and the serendipitous collision of challenges, setbacks, successes, efforts, and decisions that led him to…. now. Over a dozen stories, each connected by the thread of a falter, a restart, and success.

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“Never turn things down. Especially if something is a challenge for you. Test your reach not your grasp.”

Doubt plagues people in creative professions. More often than not, instead of believing, “I got this,” internal conversations are more of a faltering, ego-crushing, “I don’t know if I’m going to be good at this.”

Pushing through the insecurities is possible because of people who’ve gone before, who’ve also been troubled by finding satisfying resolutions and answers that address the needs of a creative brief. Every creative difficulty is supported by a community that knows the reward… of a solution that was hard to come by.

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“Everyone is always going to come to you to do exactly what you’ve done before, so you have to force yourself to evolve… unless you’re really happy with what you’re doing. I’m constantly trying to make sure that what I’m doing is something I enjoy.”

Each project leads to what’s next. An obvious statement perhaps, but Erik delivered a stern warning to the audience to be careful about choices, to not make them based on dexterity, or comfort, or convenience. But to always be doing those things that fuel passion. Because looking back at a career through a lens of “I stuck with what I did well,” might not be so satisfying.

Instead of spending a lifetime doing only what you’re “good at,” do what you love. Make a move. Make a change. Even if it’s painful.

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Erik’s first project at Adobe was We Are The Creative Class, “a rallying cry to the passion, the pain and the power of commitment to creative. It’s a creativity anthem that embodies the struggles and strife of the creative profession.”

Erik ended up at Adobe because he wanted to work on the tools that have played such a big part in his creative process. And, during the almost three years he’s been at Adobe, he’s created beautifully-memorable bodies of work like the TED All-Star Portraits and was the principal designer for the build of Adobe Brush CC.

But Erik’s first uplifting project for Adobe almost didn’t happen because of a series of Herculean constraints:

My conclusion: A creative path, littered with projects that didn’t go as planned, is not always an easy one, but the successes, the result of inevitable failures… worth the suffering.

 
Read the wrap-up of Session 2: Moving from Graphic Design to 3D Object Design with Paul Trani

7:50 AM Permalink

Aaron Draplin and The Collaborative Poster Project

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Aaron Draplin is joining Adobe at HOW Design Live.

And, in collaboration with Adobe and boutique printer Mama’s Sauce he’s also fronting Draplin in The Cloud—part commemorative poster design, part portrait of a new work process, and part collaborative art project—using Adobe Shape CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Draplin, along with Adobe evangelist Paul Trani will be presenting a lunchtime session titled Draplin Takes Mobile to Desktop about capturing shapes in Adobe Shape and taking them into Illustrator CC. He’ll also be presenting in the Adobe booth, a sort of reenactment of his design process.

He had a few things to say about this uniquely-challenging creative collaboration:

Draplin_1 From shape to design. We know you’ve used Adobe Shape a bit. Tell us how you see it fitting into your design process long term? I’ll sketch something and take a shot of it, let the thing show up in my Library, and will have vectors to refine. From paper to digital, a little quicker. Then I’ll grab that vector, lock it on the art board, and draw over it, refining the idea. It’s another fun way to capture an idea. But mainly, it eliminates steps for me. Instead of having to shoot it with my phone, load the shots to my machine, let the cloud grab it, and then place the shot? From four steps to one.

The assets for this poster will be a compilation of vector icons solicited and gathered from other people’s Adobe Shape CC captures. Tell us a bit about how you think that will work. The world’s moving faster and faster. I’m having to learn new ways of capturing my thoughts, based on what’s within an arm’s reach—paper, steamy shower glass, my desktop computer and, more and more, my phone. Using these new mobile apps, you can bridge that gap. Quick and clean. And I’m starting to rely on it in my process.

It will be fun to see stuff come flying in, out of my control. And then, making new out of it all. That randomness sounds fun. I’ll be at their mercy. Out of my element.

And about that… People on the Internet, whom you’ve never met, sending in submissions for you to design around; that’s a broad collaboration. Nothing can go wrong there, right? Not one thing. Ha! I mean, if it’s weird or mean or creepy, I reserve the right to hit the “delete” button. But for the most part, I anticipate the stuff being submitted with good spirit behind it. Let’s make something cool.
 

Mama’s Sauce: From Shape CC to Illustrator CC to screen print

This project wouldn’t have been possible without the participation of Mama’s Sauce, an incomparable boutique printer. Because their knowledge of hand-done print processes is profound, we dragged them into a conversation about this project and a larger one about vector-to-handmade printing:

When we said, “We want you to screen print a project that got its start on a smartphone with a mobile app,” did you want to run for the hills? No way. Screen print, letterpress, foil printing—they’ve all come a long way from painting on emulsion, moveable-type, hand carved blocks, chemical etching… you know, the historical processes of putting graphics in a form able of being printed on paper. While all of those are super viable still, each with their own purpose and/or aesthetic, these days, 100% of what we print in our shop comes from a digital or raster file. Considering that the average smartphone has more computing power than the spacecraft that brought us to the moon (you may want to fact check me), there isn’t much a phone can’t do these days. They’re certainly smart enough to produce vector and raster files. I mean, I do it all of the time with Adobe’s mobile apps. It’s crazy how I’m needing my computer less and less.

How do you feel about the concept now that you know a bit more about Adobe Shape and its integration with Illustrator CC? A light went off. I’m ashamed to admit it, but I didn’t realize that you could send files so easily right into our pre-press workflow. The idea of moving in that direction for receiving files is super appealing.

Talk a bit about how screen printing is the perfect complement to vector art and a digital process. It’s powerful when vector meets makers; and digital designers have embraced hand-made output in a big way. I don’t think anyone is forcing it either. It’s a natural fit. The more digital we get in our processes, the more people want to stay connected, not to fight progress, but to keep more options on the table. It’s happening in a multitude of ways too: People are scanning old wood type, exaggerating halftones in their designs, and creating aesthetics based on old production techniques that were once solely practical in nature. And when people wanted more out of the old presses, not just their type and halftone aesthetics, but rather the rest of their printing capabilities for their vector art… polymer plates came along. Modern plate-making for letterpress and modern film-making for screen print—these processes make old world printing the perfect complement for designers wanting to print work on a traditional press.

For anyone who might want to use a mobile-to-desktop-to-screen-print process, what’s most important for them to know?  Begin where you are. If you see something inspiring and want to know how it would look 1-color, how it would vectorize, you can snap a pic and see that nearly instantly. Gone are the days where you have to email yourself a file, drag to the desktop, open the asset and then get to work. You work can begin wherever.
 

Draplin in The Cloud: The collaboration

Aaron will select shapes from online submissions and incorporate them into a commemorative poster which will be printed in a limited run of 1,000 and given away at HOW Design Live. (Not attending HOW? Don’t worry, the poster will also be available as a digital download.)

Wondering how to get a shape on Aaron’s poster? It’s pretty simple. Open Adobe Shape. Capture a shape. Submit it to Aaron through the app. Get more details from Collaborate with Draplin… as an alternative, the process in the words of Aaron Draplin:


 

Check our microsite to see what else Adobe’s got going on at HOW Design Live.

9:03 AM Permalink

Google’s Mobile-Friendly Test and Adobe Muse CC

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Google recently announced a change in their site-ranking algorithm to include mobile-friendliness criteria for mobile search results, that will go live on April 21.

If your Adobe Muse site isn’t yet built to support mobile, it’s time to consider creating a tailored experience for your site visitors, whether they’re viewing on a desktop, tablet, or smartphone. Adobe Muse has the tools you need to prepare your site for this change, and ensure Google search queries continue to drive maximum site traffic, leads, and new business.

Get started with this step-by-step tutorial How to create a mobile website with Adobe Muse.

For an in-depth understanding of this change, and recommendations for creating a mobile-friendly site, read Mobile-Friendly Sites and Google Webmaster Tools on the Adobe Muse engineering team blog.

8:07 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud and Business Catalyst

Beginning May 1, 2015, Business Catalyst will no longer be included as part of Creative Cloud for new members. This change has no impact on current members, who will continue to have access to the service as part of their membership for as long as their membership remains active. Preview functionality from Muse will continue to be available for all Creative Cloud members.

We are continuously looking for opportunities to update our Creative Cloud offerings in order to focus on the features and functionality most requested by members. This includes adding new desktop and mobile apps, new features and services, as well as adjusting and changing the existing services and offerings. This change allows both the Creative Cloud and Business Catalyst teams to better focus their efforts on features for their respective members.

 

10:01 AM Permalink

Innovating Innovation: A Formula for Success

If you look at a group of people who are creative for a living, you might see a room full of people goofing off, playing with toys, or staring into space, looking like they’re doing nothing at all. Then, you’ll immediately think, “Wow, I need to get a job like that.”

As the director of marketing, for the Creative Cloud Mobile division, I can promise you that we really are working. That’s what I say to my boss every time he walks past a room full of people staring at the wall. It’s all part of the process. I can’t say that my boss entirely believes me.

In fact, he decided to challenge me. He asked me to create a process for creativity. He wanted me to find a way to make innovation repeatable and predictable. He wanted it all delivered on the back of a unicorn.

Ok, so the unicorn part was made up, but the futility I felt when faced with that task wasn’t. After all, part of creativity is the ability to be spontaneous. How was I supposed to encourage creativity when I was trying to make everyone follow a paint-by-numbers process? Was I really being asked to innovate innovation?

As I sat down to write my letter of resignation, a sudden and ironic burst of spontaneous creativity came to me. While innovation might not be a process, there is a formula to it that anyone can use:

Innovation = f (passion * velocity * creativity * some array of variables) ^ risk

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This isn’t Beal’s Conjecture, so you can put away that calculator. If you want to make innovation repeatable, it’s not about specific actions you can take. It’s more of a matter of attitude. It’s what happens when the right product meets the right people at the right time. It’s understanding all of the moving parts that come into play to make that idea a reality.

Passion

Passion is a critical component for any innovation. If the team is not passionate about what they’re doing, they should be doing something else. Inventing is creating something new, but innovation changes the way we all look at a product. Inventing is creating that plastic thing at the end of a shoelace that makes it easier to lace your shoe (that’s an aglet, in case you’re curious). Innovating is turning the simple telephone into an iPhone, which changed the way we looked at communication entirely. Both are achieved through some desire to fill a need, but only passion can lead to true innovation.

Velocity

In math, velocity is the rate of speed at which something happens. Velocity in innovation is what overcomes all of the obstacles that get in the way. Velocity is what enables teams to “fail fast,” learn, and move on. And if you’re moving fast enough, you can share your ideas openly and benefit from customer feedback without being afraid of the competition stealing the idea and bringing a product to market sooner.

 Creativity

Organizations need to foster a creative mindset among their people in order to keep creativity spontaneous. It’s not enough to tell your people to “think outside of the box” and then send them back to their box-shaped cubicles. Creativity is a byproduct of curiosity, imagination, and knowledge. Every single person has the ability to be creative, but when their environment doesn’t foster creativity, they might as well be robots. Robots can do a lot of things. They can solve algorithms, they can build cars, they can even beat Ken Jennings at Jeopardy. What they can’t do is innovate.

Even in an organization where people are expected to adhere to a specific process, there must be some amount of elasticity involved to inspire this creativity and improve on old ideas.

Variables

These variables might be within your control or outside of your control. Whether they’re changes in the market that might affect the need for your idea or internal company restrictions that might make it more difficult to bring an idea to life, all people who wish to change things need to accept the fact that there might be issues outside of their control that will change the end result. The important thing is to focus on what you can control and then identify what can’t be controlled without letting them become distractions.

Risk

Do you know the difference between a gambling addict and a professional gambler? Success. An addict will stick with a game even after they’ve lost everything to it. A pro knows nothing is certain, but if they don’t take the risk, they won’t reap the rewards.

All endeavors have some level of risk involved, and this risk can be especially high when you’re trying to innovate because you’re trying to change an established routine. People generally don’t like that, and shareholders may like it even less, but for companies to innovate, they need to embrace risk and reward risk takers. If the culture is too risk averse, all the company can do is maintain the status quo—the antithesis of innovation!

In this formula, everything is raised to the power of risk because without risk, there is no innovation. Without risk, you’d be reading this article in hieroglyphics on a cave wall. “Takes risks and is willing to fail” probably isn’t something you should write on your résumé, but it is an important part of how the world changes.

While it’s true that innovation can’t be planned, it can be inspired when organizations foster the right attitude in their people from the top down. By encouraging people to be creative, organizations can ensure that true innovation is a repeatable process, though it might not always be a predictable one.

11:43 AM Permalink

3D Printing: What You See Is What You Get

The second installment of I Went to Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015… And all I brought back is a series of blog posts, the firsthand account of a first-time Adobe SXSW Creative Camp attendee.

Session 2: Moving from Graphic Design to 3D Object Design with Paul Trani

GraphicTo3D_1 Adobe evangelist Paul Trani is a designer. With an eagerness to exploit any technology he can get his hands on, he operates on the assumption that other designers feel similarly. Which is probably why he spent an hour showing a room full of design industry professionals how to make the jump to 3D printing with Adobe Photoshop CC—software that’s been in their creative arsenal all along.

The tools make it easy

Everyone in the creative industry has been called upon to function across design disciplines, to jump from technology to technology, to use programs and processes they’ve never used prior. Usually with built-in time constraints, those leaps require them to figure things out as they go and learn along the way. They manage, according one of Paul’s opening remarks, because “the fundamentals of design don’t really change it’s the technology behind them that changes.”

Therein lies the heart of his presentation: When it comes to 3D printing, designers don’t have to use unfamiliar software to get the job done.

Photo courtesy of Rachel Luxemburg.

Photo courtesy of Rachel Luxemburg.

A gateway to 3D

Adding 3D capabilities to Photoshop CC wasn’t an effort to rule the world of 3D (it will never replace 3ds Max or Cinema 4D Studio or Rhino3D); it was instead intended to help designers move from modeling to printing. To simplify bringing in files (.stl, .obj, .3ds) from other 3D programs, and to use for creative exploration: to look at something from all angles, move it around, create a light source, change its size, design its surface… then from there, print whatever’s on the screen.

Paul’s ultimate point was that Photoshop CC is an introduction. Designers wanting to get in on 3D printing, don’t have to feel overwhelmed by the process because the same software they’ve been using for years provides the fundamental features for effortlessly jumping in and out of it. It’s a platform for exploring the possibilities of 3D, without the headaches. And that’s more than enough.

My conclusion: Photoshop CC, with its fundamental features, and its familiar UI, make it the perfect gateway to 3D design and printing.

 
Read the wrap-up of Session 1: Revamping Adobe Photoshop CC for Screen Design with Zorana Gee and Charles Pearson

5:12 PM Permalink

An Update: Creative Cloud and Support for Mac OS X

We’re hard at work on the next major release of Creative Cloud, and wanted to share some information on updated operating system requirements for members using Mac OS X.

In order to take advantage of the latest operating system features and technologies, the next major release of Creative Cloud will require Mac OS X 10.9 or higher.

If you’re running an older version of Mac OS X, such as 10.7 or 10.8, you can continue to run and install current and previous versions of the Creative Cloud applications, but will not be able to install or run the next major release of the Creative Cloud desktop applications until you upgrade to a supported version of OS X. Apple provides a free update to the latest version of OS X (10.10).

Creative Cloud Desktop, which manages application installs, will continue to be supported on OS X 10.7 and above.

In addition, the next major release of Lightroom will be supported on OS X 10.8 and above.

Focusing our efforts on more modern versions of Mac OS X allows us to concentrate on developing the features and functionality most requested by members.

11:01 AM Permalink

This Week’s Creative Challenge: Find Red in Your Commute

March has been all about colour and its importance for creatives and designers.

We’ve discussed it before in The Importance of Colour for Creatives, and more recently went to the workplace to explore blues.

Colour is everywhere, and interesting colours can be in the palm of your hand—especially if you’re equipped with Adobe Color CC.

The thing we love about colour is how it all starts with three very simple elements: the primary colours. We’ve explored two of them so far (yellow and blue) so all that’s left to complete the circle is red. And that is this week’s challenge. And it comes with a twist.
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Before we launch into the challenge itself, here are a few facts about red that should get you excited—”excited” being the key word here.

Red is proven to intensify our physical reactions, making us react faster and more forcefully; blame that on the biological heritage that makes us associate red with danger. But wait, there’s more: Did you know that men reportedly look more desirable when they’re dressed in red? This of course isn’t to say that red is always good, because it’s also been proven that this very warm colour can give people cold feet during exams, leading to a higher failure rate. Who said red was perfect?

Get creative and win big

For us, though, red will always be about winning, because this week you’ll get a chance to win a free one-year Creative Cloud subscription (Terms and Conditions apply).

In order to do that, here’s your challenge: Find interesting uses of red in your commute! It can be your local market, a bus stop, or a pair of shoes spotted on the train… the world is your canvas, so get creative. Forget painting the town red, just show us how red your town is in the first place.

Share your own creative photos of interesting uses of red in your daily commute on Twitter, tagging your local Adobe Twitter account (@AdobeUK, @AdobeFrance, @AdobeDACH, @AdobeNordic, @AdobeBelgium or @AdobeNederland) and using the hashtag #InspiredByColour.

Ready, set, go!

12:00 AM Permalink

SXSW 2015: Top Takeaways for Creatives

SXSW Interactive is a hub of activity, new ideas, inspiration, and learning. Adobe was out in full force at SXSW 2015, with a two-day Creative Camp (plus additional sessions) during the conference.

The sessions we presented covered a broad range, from the future of Photoshop to creating video for social media to discussions of the creative potential in failure and inefficiency.

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Two themes kept cropping up across the different sessions. First:

The pace of change continues to accelerate

New tools, new frameworks, and new ways to work or to find work—the creative world is changing faster than ever. Portfolios need to be updated regularly and new work shared. And working with different teams and across a broader range of devices is a necessity.

As Paul Trani pointed out, the fundamentals of design haven’t changed. Which leads to the next big takeaway:

The ability to be creative is more important than ever

Creativity not only allows you to bring ideas to life, it’s important in many other areas of life: From how to respond to challenges, to how to reach the people who will hire you, and weaving together the threads of a story you’re trying to tell… all (and more) require creative thinking. Good design is more and more important to the success of not just apps or websites but entire companies.

All these things make now one of the best times ever to be a creative professional or to become one.

Over the next weeks we’ll be sharing in-depth posts with key content from each session. The first post on Revamping Adobe Photoshop CC for Screen Design is already up. You can also see what people were saying about the sessions in real-time by checking out #AdobeSXSW on Twitter.

1:36 PM Permalink