Adobe Systems Incorporated

At SXSW 2015: Twice As Many Films Cut with Adobe Premiere Pro

Over 120 films at this year’s SXSW Film used Adobe Creative Cloud video applications, including 60 edited on Premiere Pro.

What a difference a year makes.

Last year at the 2014 SXSW Film Conference & Festival, a respectable 23 films had been cut with Premiere Pro CC, including gems like Evaporating Borders, by Iva Radivojevic, and The Immortalists, by Jason Sussberg and David Alvarado.

THE BOY, helmed by Craig McNeill,  premiering at SXSW 2015.

THE BOY, helmed by Craig McNeill, premiering at SXSW 2015.

This year the total has more than doubled with 60 films showing this year edited in Adobe’s professional NLE. Similar growth in Premiere Pro CC and Creative Cloud usage was seen at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and 2014 ended with a bang with the release of David Fincher’s Gone Girl, edited entirely in Premiere Pro CC with over 80% of the film’s effects assembled in Adobe After Effects CC.

“We’re really excited to see our growth at SXSW, especially given how this event cuts across genres to showcase artistry in so many different disciplines,” said Al Mooney, product manager for Premiere Pro CC. “The application is increasingly becoming the go-to NLE, both for established and up-and-coming filmmakers,” he explained. “Editors tell us they feel right at home very quickly and Premiere Pro CC’s  tight integration with other Creative Cloud applications, like After Effects CC and Adobe Photoshop CC make this an incredible creative environment in which to work.”

Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015

For filmmakers attending SXSW, Adobe will be hosting Creative Camp on Friday, March 13 and Saturday, March 14 with two sessions focused on video content creation and storytelling.

Below is a listing of films showing at the 2015 SXSW film Conference & Festival that incorporated Premiere Pro CC in their post-production workflow.

Narrative Feature Competition

  • THE BOY: Craig Macneill, director; Craig Macneill and Clay McLeod Chapman, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • Creative Control: Benjamin Dickinson, director; Benjamin Dickinson and Micah Bloomberg, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • KRISHA: Trey Edward Shults, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • Uncle John: Steven Piet, director; Erik Crary and Steven Piet, screeenwriters (World Premiere).

Documentary Feature Competition

  • Peace Officer: Scott Christopherson and Brad Barber, directors (World Premiere).
  • Twinsters: Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, directors (World Premiere).

Narrative Spotlight

  • The Frontier: Oren Shai, director; Webb Wilcoxen and Oren Shai, screenwriters (World Premiere).

Documentary Spotlight

Uncle John, directed by Steven Piet, premiering at SXSW 2015 in the Narrative Competition.

Uncle John, directed by Steven Piet, premiering at SXSW 2015 in the Narrative Competition.

Visions

  • Ava’s Possessions: Jordan Galland, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • The Nymphets: Gary Gardner, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • Planetary (UKUK/USA): Guy Reid, director; Steve Watts Kennedy, screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • A Wonderful Cloud: Eugene Kotlyarenko, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).

Midnighters

  • The Diabolical: Alistair Legrand, director; Alistair Legrand and Luke Harvis, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • Excess Flesh: Patrick Kennelly, director; Sigrid Gilmer and Patrick Kennelly, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • The Nightmare: Rodney Ascher, director.
  • Pod: Mickey Keating, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).

24 Beats Per Second

SXGlobal

  • Free Entry (Hungary): Yvonne Kerékgyártó, director/screenwriter (North American Premiere).

Festival Favorites

  • Being Evel: Daniel Junge, director; Daniel Junge and Davis Coombe, screenwriters.

Special Events

Narrative Shorts

Documentary Shorts

Animated Shorts

  • Butter Ya’Self : Julian Petschek, director.
  • Half Wet (UK): Sophie Koko Gate, director.
  • PALM ROT: Ryan Gillis, director.
  • Pig: Steven Subotnick, director.
  • teeth (UK/Hungary/USA): Daniel Gray and Tom Brown, directors.
Twinsters, directed by  Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, a documentary premiering at SXSW 2015.

Twinsters, directed by Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, a documentary premiering at SXSW 2015.

Midnight Shorts

Texas Shorts

Texas High School Shorts

Music Videos

Learn more about the pro video tools in Creative Cloud.

12:10 PM Permalink

The Importance of Colour for Creatives

As designers, photographers and creative professionals, we all know the importance of visual impact in our work. It is, after all, essential to communicating a message in a way that’s exciting but also effective.

During March, we’ll be exploring this topic a bit further, with a particular focus on the importance of colour for creatives.

ColorCreatives_1

Colour curiosities

Colour is a fascinating subject. Not only does it bring our work to life through inspiring and balanced themes and palettes, but also helps make our lives easier by allowing us to associate complex ideas in simple and subtle ways; for example, when you see red on a street sign, it’s a signal to stop as there might be cars coming… That’s colour in action.

Even more interesting is exploring the science and psychology behind color: Did you know that research suggests men and women actually see the colour red differently? Or that colours are responsible for at least 62% of our first impressions? Or that seeing yellow and orange can actually make you hungry? It’s not hard to find these and many other curiosities around colour, which illustrates its potential to help us create amazing work with Creative Cloud.

We want to celebrate colour in a vibrant way, and invite you to join us throughout March. Here’s how:

  • Talent Tuesdays
    We’ll be actively looking for interesting artists and projects on Behance that explore colour in exciting ways. We’ll highlight one artist per week, each Tuesday. Expect a lot of interesting talent and amazing work getting the attention it deserves
  • Weekly colour challenge
    We love a good creative challenge and know you do too, so in these next few weeks we’re exploring a different point of view around colour. Each week, we’ll pick one colour, tie it to a specific environment, and challenge you to take your best shot (pun intended) in a creative way that brings that colour and environment to life.

ColorCreatives_2

Let’s get started with yellow!

The first challenge is now live: We’re looking for inspiring uses of yellow around your home (like the image on the right).

Why yellow? Well, yellow is commonly associated with warmth, happiness, fun or friendship, which all sound like great things to have around the house. So time to create!
 

So, show us what you’ve got by sharing your own photos on Twitter and Instagram and using #InspiredByColour.
 
Have a colourful week!

12:00 AM Permalink

The Streamlined Creative Process of 3B Scientific

The global marketing team of this manufacturer of medical education equipment and content is more efficient and productive thanks to the collaborative features in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

3B_1The international group of companies known as 3B Scientific specializes in the manufacturing and marketing of educational materials for the science and medical fields. Headquartered in Germany with affiliated companies in more than 100 countries, 3B Scientific produces product lines that include artificial skeletons, anatomical models, medical training simulators, acupuncture and therapy products, and a wide range of biology, chemistry, and physics equipment.


3B_2

Collaboration across borders

The marketing team at 3B Scientific uses Creative Cloud for teams to develop catalogs, brochures, logos, internal documents, websites, mobile design ads, direct mail pieces, and even T-shirt designs. Adobe Photoshop CC provides excellent image enhancement tools, while Adobe Illustrator CC is the go-to solution for logos and graphics, and Adobe InDesign CC supports creative layout for print pieces.

Although the marketing group previously used Final Cut Pro for video editing, the company is taking advantage of the wide range of software in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams by switching to Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects CC. “Working with Creative Cloud for teams means that we have all of the creative tools we need at our fingertips,” says Joseph Allen, senior graphic designer at 3B Scientific. “We can also experiment with new software at any time to expand our skills and creative offerings (our graphic designers, in particular, appreciate the chance to play around with it).”

3B_3 In addition to the benefits that come with standardizing software, 3B Scientific takes advantage of the cloud storage available with its Creative Cloud for teams membership to simplify sharing files. When downloading files to individual desktops and working with colleagues in different time zones, it can be difficult to keep track of which files are the most recent; cloud storage solves this problem, helping marketers around the world quickly locate the latest versions of projects and files. “Rather than emailing files back and forth, the cloud storage gives us a central area to store and sync files,” says Allen. “It streamlines our processes to make collaborating anywhere in the world incredibly simple.”

Creative Cloud for teams also syncs projects, settings, and even fonts for users who take work home. By creating seamless workflows and collaborative processes, it enables the global marketing team to be more efficient and productive. “Coordinating with colleagues in Europe and Asia can be a time-consuming process. There are many opportunities for our lines to get crossed, which can cause miscommunications and delays,” says Allen. “With Creative Cloud for teams, we’re improving our communication and collaboration, which ultimately enhances our ability to share valuable knowledge with customers worldwide.”

Read the 3B Scientific case study.

12:37 PM Permalink

Ito-ya—First Stop for Art Supplies in Tokyo

On a recent trip to Tokyo, we had the pleasure of visiting Ito-ya, the famed art supply store in Ginza.

Itoya_4

The store advertises its impressive collection of “fine writing instruments, leather goods, art supplies, custom frames, and globes” with deserved confidence. But they’re also aware of the special experience at play: “It’s like a ‘hideaway for adults'; you can relax and enjoy your shopping time.”


If every major city has a standout art supply store, Ito-ya is Tokyo’s.

Well-designed art supply stores like Ito-ya have playful, eye-catching exteriors that invite passersby to make detours, and stop in. But what draws people into Ito-ya’s six-story building isn’t just the large paperclip attached to the outside of the building, it’s the ground level’s industrial appearance and its immense floor-to-ceiling windows. Even from the outside it’s easy to see how Ito-ya borrows design elements from fine jewelry stores, presenting art and office supplies in an environment that provides them an elevated level of respect—implying that they are as valuable as the earth’s most precious jewels.

Itoya_2Itoya_3


Beautifully-curated congruity

While much more could be said about the architectural and interior design schema of Ito-ya, the products deserve equal attention. Wandering around the store our eyes were constantly drawn to the bright color spreads created by the pens, markers, pencils, pastels, and paints lined up across seemingly endless shelves.

Itoya_1 It was a treat to our senses to look down each aisle and catch the color gradients as they moved horizontally from foreground to background. Equally so, it was a delight to inspect the well-curated variety of brushes, canvases, paper, and pencils (an encounter with variety reminiscent of a visit to a vibrant farmers market when what you’re used to is a city grocery store).

Ito-ya is a reminder that analog tools and physical environments are extremely valuable to designers who work primarily in the digital realm, that there is something wonderful about getting our hands dirty with oil or chalk pastels, the need to sharpen pencils when the lead meets the wood, or to dip a brush in paint and water. With the potential for creativity abundant in each tool and medium they carry, Ito-ya harks back to a time when inspiration co-existed with messiness… and anyone who enters, even those who aren’t artistically inclined, leave with aspirations to incorporate more creativity into their lives.

 

This is the first post in a new series where we’ll be covering art supply stores all over the world. If you have suggestions for stores we should see, drop us a comment; we’re frequently on the road and love discovering new places.

11:07 AM Permalink

A Productive Pairing: Banner Engineering and Creative Cloud for Teams

Banner Engineering, a leader in industrial and process automation, brings marketing and technical literature in-house with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

Banner_1

Founded almost 50 years ago as a small electronics engineering firm, Banner Engineering has grown into a global leader in process and industrial automation. The company provides customers worldwide with industry-leading photo eyes, sensors, machine safety equipment, and lighting devices that increase efficiency, monitor quality, and safeguard employees.

Small team big output

The company currently offers thousands of innovative products and develops hundreds of new solutions every year. Despite its impressive product line-up, the company operates with a small marketing team that handles almost all marketing and technical documentation, including product and company brochures, tradeshow displays, success stories, product packaging, technical illustrations, videos, software GUI graphics, and a comprehensive printed product catalog with more than 1,000 pages.

Banner Catalogs“We have a lean marketing team for a company of our size, producing the output of teams two or three times larger,” says Delaine Suess, senior graphic designer for corporate branding in the marketing department. “We need to work as efficiently as possible.”

Banner has been using Adobe creative software as its standard for graphics and documents for the past eighteen years, but in a budget-conscious environment, didn’t always have the funds for every software upgrade. Now, with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, Banner has access to the latest versions of all creative software.

The right tools for the job(s)

Marketers use Adobe InDesign CC for documents, including Banner’s comprehensive, 1,000-page catalog. Adobe InCopy CC enables copywriters to proof and make quick changes to InDesign files even when working simultaneously with designers, making the proofing process faster and more consistent. For diagrams and icons, Adobe Illustrator CC is the standard used by Banner and its vendors, while Adobe Photoshop CC is used to edit a wide range of images.

Banner_3Products such as LED lights are difficult to photograph accurately, so Banner adds simulated lighting effects in Photoshop CC to give customers a better idea of products. Marketers also use it to composite images to show a product in use or to add effects, such as lighting, to rendered Autodesk 3ds Max files.

Banner relies on Adobe Acrobat XI for its proofing needs. Team members can review, edit, and comment easily within the PDF so all involved can easily track their changes during the proofing process. “We use shared reviews so our engineers and sales people can annotate PDFs consistently with familiar tools. And our marketing team can track progress and consolidate comments,” said Suess.

For a company with a small team, that creates almost all of its marketing and technical literature in-house, productivity is key. “Adobe Creative Cloud for teams gives us the exact tools that we need to get projects done as quickly as possible,” says Suess.

Read the Banner Engineering case study.

10:19 AM Permalink

New to web design? Learn HTML and CSS inside Adobe Dreamweaver CC.

The latest update to Adobe Dreamweaver CC includes a rich set of tutorials available directly inside the app. Not only are the tutorials aesthetically engaging, they provide meaningful, relevant content for established and aspiring web designers.

 

Figure 1. Click the Get files button to download the project files for a tutorial.

Figure 1. Click the Get files button to download the project files for a tutorial.

Learn web design directly inside Dreamweaver CC

A lot time went into planning content geared towards new web designers wanting to get familiar with the basics of web development, including learning HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, directly inside Dreamweaver. Access these tutorials from the Getting Started tab within the welcome screen (Figure 1).

These tutorials are broken down into isolated topics consisting of between two and ten steps. Coupled with downloadable starter files they allow you to focus on the topic at hand and accomplish the tasks quickly with a high guarantee of success.

The Getting Started series

This group of tutorials helps new designers learn the fundamentals of web design. It covers the phases of a web design project beginning with the planning stages all the way through publishing to the web (click the thumbnails below to view the series).

 

Figure 2. Learn custom tips and tricks from the Key Techniques tab.

Figure 2. Learn custom tips and tricks from the Key Techniques tab.

Custom tips and techniques

Once you have the fundamentals down, check out the Tips & Techniques tab for some advanced topics and web design extras such as how to center a website, create CSS-based navigation menus, build a portfolio gallery, and more (Figure 2).

Our users requested many of these topics, so we’d love to hear directly from you about any additional topics that you would find helpful. Please fill out our survey and let us know what you think.

Tour of new features

The Dreamweaver team has done a lot of work over the years to add features to help web designers. You can now pull web design code and assets directly from Photoshop comps, start a web project from responsive starter templates, enhance your designs with rich typography, and more. To see the history of these new features and how to use them, visit the New Features tab in the Dreamweaver welcome screen (Figure 3).

Figure 3. The New Features tab includes tutorials on how to use the features added to current and past versions.

Figure 3. The New Features tab includes tutorials on how to use the features added to current and past versions.

Check daily for new content!

Be sure to update to the latest version of Dreamweaver CC and check often; new tutorials will be available on a daily basis. Also, check out our Learn & Support page for the full offering of tutorials, help topics, and support resources.

10:40 AM Permalink

A Few Minutes with Stephen Coles

We’re looking forward to our first Working Late event in San Francisco this Wednesday (February 25) with editor/typographer Stephen Coles. If you haven’t already grabbed tickets, there’s still room; claim one from the Eventbrite page.

Stephen will be presenting “A Typeface is a Chair,” which interweaves typography with Mid-century Modernist furniture design. To gear up for the talk, we asked Stephen a few questions about typography, his influences, and some of his favorite typographic inspirations.

Illustration by Laura Serra.

Illustration by Laura Serra.

Illustration by Laura Serra.

Illustration by Laura Serra.



What excites you most about typography?

Just when I think I’ve seen it all—every typographic possibility has been exploited, the font market is saturated—someone does something new. Almost as exciting is when I discover that one of these things was done 50 years ago and most people didn’t realize it. That’s the stuff I usually post on Fonts In Use or Flickr.

Coles_2

Who are your mentors? What are the most memorable things they’ve taught you?

My first boss in the type industry, Erik Spiekermann, taught me an important lesson about hiring: Don’t start with a position and look for candidates to fill it. Instead, seek out smart people you trust and want to work with, and let them create the position that fits them.

My other mentor is my mom. She told me to be kind to people.

What are some fun places to go for typographic inspiration both online and off?

Online: Flickr is the best place on the Internet to see old type specimens, rare magazines, and weird signs. Forget Instagram for type (Instagram is for pet videos and things that are square. Type is almost never square.)

Offline: San Francisco Signseeing
Coles_31. Mission Street, from 16th to Cesar Chavez.


Coles_42. The Dahl-Beck Electric sign on Mission and 2nd.


Coles_53. The nineteenth-century gravestones in Oakland’s Mountain View Cemetery.


4. The Letterform Archive. Did you know that one of the world’s most complete collections of typographic ephemera, original artwork, and typeface specimens is here in San Francisco? Go see it.

What are you looking forward to with the future of typography?

For hundreds of years, type was arranged by typographers and set by typesetters: a narrow subset of design specialists with special equipment and special training. In this new era of self-publishing, suddenly everyone is a typographer. This is both scary and exciting. It brings new education challenges: for instance, basic terms like “type” are increasingly misused. (Hint: most of the signs and stone carving I mentioned above are all examples of lettering; stuff made with fonts is type.) The positive news is that this expansion of the craft engages specialists from other fields who haven’t had to think about type until now. People from diverse disciplines (like web design and engineering) are contributing all sorts of new ideas to typography.

Also, font jokes make more sense at a normal person party than they used to.

In anticipation of your talk on Wednesday, will you give us a teaser?

You will see how birdwatching is like fontspotting. You will learn how a chair is like a typeface. You will hear the sound Gill Sans makes.
 

We can’t wait to hear more from Stephen on Wednesday at our Working Late event in San Francisco. There will be food and drinks, typographic design talk and, probably, some font jokes. So, visit Eventbrite to grab a ticket if you haven’t already, and we’ll see you there.

4:37 PM Permalink

Sundance Filmmaker Antonio Ribeiro Brings His Creativity Online

For those who were following the Sundance Film Festival this year, Antonio Ribeiro may be a familiar name. Ribeiro is the editor and producer of Things of the Aimless Wanderer, a film by Kivu Ruhorahoza.

Since his debut feature film Grey Matter, which premiered at Tribeca in 2011, scooping the Juri Special Mention and Best Actors award, Antonio has been collaborating with Kivu Ruhorahoza, creating Moon Road Films, a production company whose main mission is to find original new ways to tell stories. Their latest film is one of only half dozen or so selected feature films screened in the New Frontier category at the renowned festival.

MoonRoad_Website

As if that’s not impressive enough, Antonio Riberio is also the man behind the film’s accompanying website. Although he doesn’t see himself as a web designer, that’s exactly the role he found himself in, as time was running out prior to the World Premiere of Things of the Aimless Wanderer.

When you have a film on your hands that you know is going places, you need an online destination for fans, critics and other stakeholders. You need a site that can support embedded video, have social media sharing capabilities, incorporate a tagging structure and host a blog. Oh, and of course it needs to look good and be easy to navigate, interactive, and intuitive.

In comes the Creative Cloud.

Ribeiro, who used Adobe Premiere Pro CC to cut Things of the Aimless Wanderer and Adobe After Effects CC to deal with some needed matting and mask work, is a Creative Cloud subscriber. He turned his attention from purple to green.

“Although I am not a web developer or designer, I started to explore the use of  Dreamweaver CC, as it provided an interface between language and design,” said Ribeiro. “Initially I was not familiar with HTML or CSS, but after using Dreamweaver CC and reading a few tutorials I was able to make sense of what I was doing.”

He did have some help. Ribeiro opted to purchase a website template in order to get a professional looking site off the ground without significant costs, time constraints or the technical demands of also learning how to be a full-fledged web designer. He loaded the template into Dreamweaver CC and began to explore, learning along the way.

“Dreamweaver has given me an understanding of what HTML and CSS do. Using the Live tab I can understand behavior through the ability to Extract Assets from Photoshop CC comps,” said Ribeiro.

“I feel it’s strange for me to say this, as I always feel slightly self-conscious that I am no expert, but I now have the confidence to look at a template and understand how it breaks down into its different components.”

Ingenuity is often born from circumstance, and Ribeiro certainly had a need to fill and a limited budget to make it so.

“After all, I am a filmmaker but if I can make and customize good looking sites for my different projects, then it’s a win-win situation,” said Ribeiro. “In this business, good presentation counts.”

In the end, from film to website, Creative Cloud touched each step of Ribeiro’s workflow. In many ways, he represents the kind of new creative who runs a small shop, wears many hats and learns to tackle new aspects of a growing business on the fly.

“The best thing I could have done, was to embrace the Cloud, where I can have access to all the programs I need for one single monthly fee,” said Ribeiro.

Learn more about Things of the Aimless Wanderer in this video:

Download a free trial of Adobe Dreamweaver CC today to start pushing your creative boundaries.

10:24 AM Permalink

Brian Yap: From Shape to Illustration

When we saw Brian Yap’s Vector Drawing on The Go post on INSPIRE, about his Adobe Shape CC to Adobe Illustrator CC work process, we had a few questions about how using Shape to capture the flicker of an idea eventually translates into a full-blown illustration or design concept. Since he’s now an associate creative director on Adobe’s Studio Team, we caught up with him about his process, his technique, and how he feels about the tools.

What Brian had to say about mobile apps and productivity, his obsession with layers, and the value of being truly satisfied with each step in the creative process:

A quick loose portrait of Cullen O'Donnel of the Logos began with a photo.

A quick loose portrait of Cullen O’Donnel of the Logos began with a photo.

What’s the value of capturing a vector outline in Shape (as opposed to drawing it yourself)? Shape is perfect for when you want a quick and loose outline of an image, even if you end up heavily drawing over it, it saves tons of time and creates some cool effects (it reminds me what we used to get from double and triple xeroxing images.)

Alternatively, when you do sketch on paper, how nice is it to be able to capture one of your own sketches in Shape without having to trace it in Illustrator CC? As the app gets better and better I fully expect to be able to capture sketches straight to vector that will need very little clean up. I’m excited to see where that workflow leads.

How much refinement do you usually do once you have an image in Shape? Do you prefer to start with as many details as possible? Or just a basic outline? So far, I’ve been pushing the detail all the way up to capture as much as possible, but there’s so much more you can play with by lowering that or reversing the capture.

We know you use Adobe Illustrator Draw for a lot of away-from-your-desk drawing. How much easier is it to transfer your work between the three applications now that there’s Creative Cloud Libraries? I honestly can’t emphasize enough how important it is to me that all the Adobe apps are connected through Creative Cloud Libraries. It makes the pure act of working and creating seamless. Ease of use and accessibility to all of my files is huge to me.

From photo to Adobe Shape capture.

From photo to Adobe Shape capture.

You sound really organized. How do you feel about using CC Libraries to organize your content from the time you capture it until the time you complete it? Without a doubt, CC Libraries has made moving from mobile to desktop incredibly simple. The mobile apps, especially the ones that allow you to capture things out in the world, really need that connection and accessibility to be useful. I don’t ever have to think about where my captures are.

How has your drawing process changed since you started incorporating mobile apps into it? Working digitally, and with drawing apps on a tablet, I’ve become insanely more productive. I used to be scared to “waste time” trying different things; now I don’t ever stop at just the first pass at doing something. I used to draw on sketch pads, and when deadlines were limiting, moved on to the next step as soon as something looked successful, then I’d lament later that it could be better.

I know every artist says that, but there’s value in getting to that point of true satisfaction. What you learn in those last steps ALWAYS comes through in the final piece. Working with mobile apps and ingesting them into my process has opened all those possibilities back up to me. Recently I’ve been experimenting more—letting my drawing style loosen up, starting with photographic reference and captures in Shape, and playing more and more with different tools.

You described your layer management system by saying, “I usually select each color and merge all shapes of each color to keep things tidy.” Does your layers management begin in Draw or do you not worry about it until you get the art into Illustrator CC? Okay, I’m a little bit obsessive, so I start right away getting to know layers in whatever application they’re in. When you think about it, layers are the greatest and purist advantage to working digitally.

I mostly split colors into different layers. As the piece gets more and more complex, this really helps when I want to edit something. Then when I take something into Illustrator CC, the organization transfers over. (I take it one step further and merge all objects of the same color to make it easy to edit color.) And, since my style tends toward flat poster color style work, I often restrict myself to three or four colors, with an eye towards screen printing.

From Adobe Shape capture to finished illustration.

From Adobe Shape capture to finished illustration.

What’s the distinction between how you use Adobe Draw and how you use Illustrator CC to fine-tune your work? I almost always do my loose drawing in Draw. I like the feel of the tablet in my hand (akin to a sketchbook) and being able to do a ton of my drawing on the couch or on my commute. There was always a threshold point though where I would move it into Illustrator CC to finish the job. But, in truth, that point is becoming a grey area. With the Touch Slide tools in Draw, Shape and Color, I can do a lot more just on my iPad. But I’ve even started drawing more in Illustrator CC with the Surface Pro 3, so it’s turning into a decision I make based on the project.

Out of curiosity, how many image traces do you have in your Shape libraries? Ha, you might be scared… I would guess, that in 4 or 5 different libraries, maybe 50–75. I’m working on another experiment and that particular library is getting out of control (and, as the app grows I expect that to get a lot bigger).

If it’s not a secret, what are you working on now/next? I have a few things going right now, one of them purely for fun and experimentation, that I’m really excited about. I captured a ton of Shape graphics on a recent trek to Muir woods and want to develop a portrait of John Muir using those as textures. They’re so complex that just trying to use the photos I took and draw over them would be monumentally time consuming. But I found the place so inspiring that I think having the image be built from those captures will imbue the illustration in a way that simply drawing his portrait could never match.

Brian’s Shape to Draw to Illustrator CC process on INSPIRE.
Adobe Shape CC and Adobe Illustrator Draw in the iTunes App Store.
Haven’t tried Creative Cloud? Take it for a free trial run.

3:50 PM Permalink

Photoshop’s 25th Anniversary!

Twenty five years ago who would have guessed that Photoshop would eventually go on to become the quintessential tool in our creative toolbox.

Photoshop25

No other product has had as profound an impact on the creative industry—empowering artists, designers, filmmakers, and photographers to express themselves and their ideas visually.

Did you know that the iconic software was developed by two brothers, one in the movie business and one a photographer? Or that version 1.0 had more to do with special effects than still images? Read more insights about how Photoshop got started in our Q/A with co-creator Thomas Knoll. And check out the Photoshop team blog that discusses how we’ll be celebrating all year.

12:04 PM Permalink