Adobe Systems Incorporated

From Design to Code, in A Snap, with Creative Cloud Extract

With the release of the Creative Cloud Extract, Adobe has made it easier to go from Adobe Photoshop CC design to code. In the past, this workflow often included a tedious process of creating a specification, style guide or red lines for a design so that a developer could more easily translate it into code. Extract provides solutions for getting the style information out of a design in just a few clicks. This information includes positioning of elements, sizes, colors, fonts and gradients. We have also streamlined the process of exporting assets out of Photoshop CC.

What’s new for designers and developers:

Extract Assets in Photoshop CC

With the October update of Photoshop CC comes a new feature called “Extract Assets” that allows designers to quickly extract image assets from layers for multiple screens. You might be familiar with using slices to get images out from Photoshop CC, or repetitively having to “Save for Web” for each image you need. With Extract, you can manage all assets for web and mobile designs, in one dialog. It will save you so much time: Just select all the layers you want to export and choose the “Extract Assets” menu item.

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From the Extract Assets dialog where you specify formats to output (PNG, JPG, GIF or SVG), you can also view a preview of the image to be created, setup 1x, 2x or more versions of all image assets, and add or remove layers from which to extract assets. For more information on Extract Assets in Photoshop, visit this CC Learn tutorial.

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Extract in Creative Cloud Assets

If you store PSDs in Creative Cloud, you get access to so much more useful web information. The Extract view of your PSD in Creative Cloud gives you access to the following information:

  • The layer hierarchy along with the ability to toggle layers on and off
  • CSS styles for layers
  • A style guide of colors and fonts used in the design
  • Position and size of elements in the design
  • The ability to extract assets to PNG, JPG or SVG

From Creative Cloud Assets, this PSD can also be shared with anyone. Using the public URL, the recipient can use Extract in Creative Cloud Assets in their browser to get all of the same useful information to translate this design into code.

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Extract in Dreamweaver

You can now browse and view your Photoshop CC documents stored in Creative Cloud directly within Adobe Dreamweaver CC, letting you rapidly take your designs to code. Yes, that’s right, you can open a fully-layered PSD in Dreamweaver CC. When a PSD is loaded, you can extract CSS, colors, gradients, fonts, measurements and web-optimized images from your Photoshop layers when building your web projects. This will let you preserve the integrity of the design when bringing it to code, and takes the guesswork out of how that PSD will translate to web.

When a PSD is loaded in Dreamweaver CC, you can fully inspect the CSS pulled from Photoshop CC layers. When you select a layer, you’ll see all the CSS associated with that selection. This is useful for grabbing colors, gradients, border-radius, font styles and more when building the front-end of your website—it’s kind of like Web Inspector for a PSD.

You can also code hint directly into a PSD for full control as you write styles. When writing CSS, contextual code hints are pulled right from your Photoshop CC layers, expediting the time it takes to go from comp to code. For more information on Extract in Dreamweaver CC, visit this CC Learn article.

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10:19 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud: New Features + New Mobile Apps = New Tutorials

At Adobe MAX 2014 the Creative Cloud Learn team launched more than 40 new tutorials to help members learn new features and updated techniques.

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Hi everyone!

It’s been a big week for the Creative Cloud Learn team. Many of us were lucky enough to be at MAX, where we were able to meet many of our customers, both in labs and at the Adobe Booth in the Pavilion. Additionally, on Monday, Adobe released major updates to Creative Cloud’s desktop apps along with new mobile apps. All of these new features are covered in over 40 new tutorials. Some of the highlights:

  • How to get started with Creative Cloud Libraries—Browse and access your favorite creative assets (colors, type styles, graphics, brushes, and more) in new libraries that sync to Creative Cloud and are available in Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe Photoshop CC, and many of the new mobile apps.
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  • Extract overview—Easily extract optimized image assets from layers and save them to various formats and resolutions, including SVG, using the Extract PSD assets workflow. This feature is also integrated with Creative Cloud on the web and with Adobe Dreamweaver CC. The feature will be a huge timesaver for designers and developers who use a comp-to-code workflow. See for yourself; check out Extract a Photoshop design into code in Dreamweaver.
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  • Add interactivity to fixed layout EPUBs—Enhance fixed layout EPUBs with hyperlinks, slideshows, animations, and triggering buttons that you have created directly in Adobe InDesign CC.
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  • Join and trim paths—Second only to the Surface Pro giveaway, the demo of Illustrator CC’s  Join tool drew the loudest applause during the MAX Day 1 Keynote!
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  • We also deployed over 60 tutorials to support Photoshop CC’s new Welcome screen. After upgrading, start Photoshop CC and take a few minutes to navigate through this panel  that presents videos based on the features you use. I think you’ll like what you see.

 

Many, many people put in a lot of hours and hard work on this and I want to take a minute to acknowledge them:

  • I’d like to thank all of our presenters, in particular, Matt Pizzi, Dan Carr, Laura Shoe, Curt Fukuda, and the folks at Infinite Skills. They all put in extra effort to make sure we got things right.
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  • Also, I want to thank my editorial team: Amy Hope, Erick Vera, Karla Milosevich, Rita Amladi, Maile Valentine, Stefan Gruenwedel, Michael Salinero, Hemanth Sharma, Ray Camden, and Jill Merlin did an awesome job and I can’t thank them enough.
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  • We talk a lot about design-led innovation, and Luanne Seymour’s design team makes it happen: Chelsea Allen, Erica Larson, Janelle Flores, Michael Jarrott, Kendall Plant, Laura Kersell, Amanda Gross Tuft, Julia Grummel, and Alec Malloy are all awesome
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  • Other major contributors include Robin Maccan, Mally Gardiner, Daniel Taborga, Jenn Clark, Viv Moses, Kirsti Aho, Serena Fox, Craig Goodman, Michelle Yaiser, George Fox, Christine Yarrow, Quinn Warble, Diane Catt, Ed Sullivan, and of course, Ben Forta.

Huge apologies if I’ve forgotten anyone; this was a real team effort.

Most of our pages link to surveys or forums, so please let us know what you think.

—Randy

11:29 AM Permalink

New Features, and A Mobile App, for Creative Cloud’s Pro Video Tools

Updated desktop features, born from a collaboration with David Fincher’s Gone Girl team, and Adobe Premiere Clip, a new mobile app.

On Monday, at Adobe MAX 2014, the world’s leading creativity conference, Adobe announced the availability of new and updated free mobile apps, like the all-new Adobe Premiere Clip for iOS, and 2014.1 updates to Creative Cloud applications, including all of the video tools:

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC
Adobe After Effects CC
Adobe SpeedGrade CC
Adobe Prelude CC
Adobe Audition CC
Adobe Media Encoder CC
Adobe Story CC Plus
Adobe Anywhere

Adobe previewed the new video features at IBC 2014 last month. Key themes for the updates include: new project and media management capabilities, such as Search bins and Destination Publishing; support for cutting-edge technologies, like HiDPI Windows 8.1 displays and devices and read/write support for the GoPro CineForm intermediate codec; and more streamlined workflows, including Curves adjustments and a refined new Look workflow in SpeedGrade CC.

Introducing Adobe Premiere Clip

The MAX announcements also included the release of Adobe Premiere Clip, a brand new iOS app that makes it easy to turn footage on an iPhone or iPad into great-looking videos. The app allows users to edit and enhance video with professional looks, effects, and audio. Premiere Clip uses Creative Cloud to automatically sync projects between devices, so that users can shoot whenever they have an opportunity—and edit later when they have time. Users can also move Clip projects into Premiere Pro CC via their Creative Profile, which provides access to their rich desktop toolset.

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“With Premiere Clip we’re making editing a function that is always in your hands. Our goal is to bring the tools to the media,” explained Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “This allows people to ‘just do it’ and start making their own beautiful videos, completely on device, or to use it as a kind of sketchbook for video pros who want to rough out ideas to bring into Premiere Pro.”

Adobe Premiere Clip for iPhone and iPad is available as a free download in the iTunes App Store.

The Influence of Gone Girl

Coinciding with the recent theatrical release of Gone Girl—directed by David Fincher and edited on Premiere Pro CC by Kirk Baxter, ACE—the new updates include a number of features developed in collaboration with Team Fincher. These include larger features, like Multi-project workflows and Advanced Timeline search, workflow enhancements like EDL improvements and Render & Replace, and important details of the UI and workspace refinements, such as ripple label colors and definable marker colors, the way in- and out ranges are displayed.

In Gone Girl Rosamund Pike portrays Amy Dunne, whose mysterious disappearance turns her husband into a possible murder suspect.

“I believe this was the first major Hollywood film shot at 6K so the scope of the project was huge.” said Al Mooney, senior product manager. “We were working with an artistically-driven and incredibly technical team at the top of their game. It was an inspiring experience for us and we’re immensely proud to have been part of it.”

Fully 80 percent of Gone Girl ended up as some form of After Effects CC composition on the final Premiere Pro Timeline for the project. This gave rise to the request for the Render & Replace feature from Team Fincher. Render & Replace ensures fast playback of projects with lots of visual effects by substituting comps with rendered clips—without losing Dynamic Link integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects. “It’s exciting for us to be releasing features for all of our users that have evolved out of a collaboration with one of the best filmmakers in the business,” added Mooney.

 

Along with a significant update to Premiere Pro CC, all of the video tools received enhancements and new features with the 2014.1 release. For more information watch this overview video by Al Mooney.

To learn more about Adobe’s collaboration with David Fincher and his team on Gone Girl, read Gone Girl Marks Yet Another Milestone for Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Learn more about Adobe Premiere Clip and the rest of Adobe’s new and updated mobile apps.

Watch the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote and learn more about all of the great new fall releases.

Pricing and availability

Today’s updates to Creative Cloud are available to Creative Cloud members as part of their membership at no additional cost. To join Creative Cloud, special promotional pricing is available to customers who own Adobe Creative Suite 3 or later and membership plans are available for individuals, students, photographers, teams, educational institutions, government agencies and enterprises.

10:36 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud Libraries—Seamless Access to Creative Assets

Yesterday, in Los Angeles, during the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote we announced the best versions yet of our Creative Cloud desktop apps and services and new mobile apps… making your creative workflow across apps and devices easier than ever.

We also introduced Creative Cloud Libraries, a design system that provides seamless access to your creative assets across Creative Cloud’s desktop tools and its companion mobile apps and services (such as Creative Cloud Market).

Creative Cloud Libraries uses your Creative Profile to connect your favorite desktop tools, mobile apps and services to each other. Unlocked by your Adobe ID, your Creative Profile is a personalized hub that connects your favorite tools and content in one fluid creative experience.

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Creative ingredients

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Great content that moves and inspires is built on a foundation of creative ingredients (assets like colors, text styles, logos, icons, patterns, brushes and images) that you reuse and remix. Today, these ingredients are stored all over the place: on a laptop, on a file server, in cloud storage, or scribbled on a notepad or whiteboard. Finding them when you need them is always more difficult than it should be.

There’s something we learned from a professional chef’s kitchen—where all the ingredients necessary to prepare menu items are laid out and ready to use. In a pro kitchen, chefs prepare dishes quickly and efficiently without pausing to seek out an important ingredient right in the middle of the preparation. This setup even has a fancy name, “mise en place.’

Mise en Place by Charles Haynes.

Mise en Place by Charles Haynes.

Creative Cloud Libraries is like managing your own professional kitchen, helping you organize and prepare creative ingredients (assets) so that they are where you need them when you need them—in your apps, on the desktop, on your mobile devices, and on the web.


What can you put in your library? Lots of things!

  • Text Styles: In Photoshop and Illustrator CC collect and use all the text settings, from the basics (font size and font family) to the more advanced (OpenType discretionary ligatures). It’s a great way to use consistent text styling across applications which has, for some time, been a frequently requested feature from designers.
  • Layer Styles: In Photoshop CC, you can use layer styles to define graphic effects such as drop shadows, glows, bevels, strokes, and fills. And now they can be stored in your Creative Cloud Libraries and reused in other documents.
  • Brushes: With the new Adobe Brush CC app we make it incredibly easy to create new brushes right on your iPhone, which you can then use in Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC or on a tablet with Adobe Illustrator Draw. You can also find some beautiful brushes created by members of the Behance community. A part of your Creative Cloud membership, we’ve made a few available in Creative Cloud Market.
  • Graphics: There are all sorts of graphic elements you can store in your Creative Cloud Libraries—icons, logos, photos, textures, patterns. Some may be bitmaps, others vector-based; regardless of their original format, you can use them anywhere you can use graphics, and they will be automatically translated to the right format as needed.

Stay in sync

Creative Cloud Libraries are stored on your local device and automatically sync (the power of your Creative Profile) whenever you’re online. While you’re offline you can continue to use, add, remove or modify assets, and the next time you’re connected all of your changes will get synchronized automatically and any necessary updates merged to your local version.

Stay organized

There are many ways to use Creative Cloud Libraries, and you can create as many Creative Cloud Libraries as you’d like. Some suggestions:

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  • Collect the “go to” assets that you like to reuse across projects
  • Make a separate library for each project you’re working on, and group all related assets
  • Keep all of your branded assets in one library—like having your own brand guidelines with ready-to-use assets
  • Create a “kit” of user interface elements to quickly whip out screen prototypes
  • Keep a set of ingredients in a library to use for a campaign you’re working on
  • Gather a set of inspirational assets to build a virtual “mood board” for your next project

We’re sure you’ll come up with more ways to use them. Let us know in the comments below how you plan to use Libraries.

Connected creativity

Inspiration can strike anytime, anywhere. It doesn’t wait until you are conveniently sitting at your desk. With our new mobile apps, Adobe Brush CC, Adobe Shape CC and Adobe Color CC you can grab inspiration with your mobile device no matter where you are. Using your device’s camera, turn what you see around you into color themes with Adobe Color CC, create shapes and vector objects with Adobe Shape CC, and unique brushes with Adobe Brush CC.

Once stored in one of your Creative Cloud Libraries, you can use these assets in other mobile apps—such as Adobe Illustrator Draw or Adobe Photoshop Sketch, and you can use in your desktop apps, such as Photoshop CC or Illustrator CC.

To jump start your creativity, we have curated thousands of high-quality assets in Creative Cloud Market. These were created by members of the Behance community, and include useful icons and vector shapes, beautiful patterns, brushes and more. Available from the Creative Cloud desktop app, select any asset as well as the library you want it in, and the asset will appear right where you need it, through your Creative Profile, whether on a desktop or mobile.

Now it’s easy to start a project with your iPhone, continue on your tablet and finish on the desktop. Your creation process is moving effortlessly and fluidly between applications and locations. This is truly connected creativity.

What’s next?

To get started with Creative Cloud Libraries, download our new mobile apps for iOS today from the iTunes App Store. They’re free. Use them on their own or with our completely new Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC, available today as part of your Creative Cloud membership.

And don’t forget, if you’re attending Adobe MAX join us in our session How Creative Ingredients Fuel Creativity and Productivity to learn more about Creative Cloud Libraries.

Video tutorials

11:56 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud: A New Era of Mobile Creativity

Just over three months after the major 2014 release of Creative Cloud, we’re delivering another milestone Creative Cloud release at Adobe MAX 2014. A quick run-down of the new and updated Creative Cloud apps, features and services that are available today.

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Your Creative Profile connects you to your work

Think you can’t do “real” creative work on your iPhone or iPad? That’s about to change. With this release, our Creative Cloud team is setting out to transform the way you work across desktops and devices.

It all starts with a Creative Profile—your creative identity within Creative Cloud—the heart of this Creative Cloud release. Your Creative Profile connects you to your work, to the assets you create with, and to the communities you care about—wherever you are. Your files, photos, colors, brushes, shapes, fonts, text styles, graphics, and assets from Creative Cloud Market will be at your fingertips because your Creative Profile moves with you. It works across apps and across devices, giving you access to what you need, when you need it, and in the right context.

Meet the mobile app families

In June we brought the power of Adobe Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC to devices with a complementary set of imaging and illustration mobile apps. Not only do these apps break down the silos between desktop and mobile, but they’re fun and easy to use, and provide countless new ways to express your creativity. Today we’re proudly debuting more new apps, as well as updates to all of the apps we introduced in June:

The Illustrator family of apps extends the power of Illustrator CC to mobile devices:

MAX_1_DrawAdobe Illustrator Draw—An all-new app that reinvents the best of Adobe Ideas, letting you work with familiar tools and features in a modern, streamlined interface. Better syncing makes it easier to send drawings to Illustrator CC for refinement.

MAX_2_LineAdobe Illustrator Line—A major update to the app we first shipped in June; Line sketches can now be sent to Illustrator CC, enabling you to edit original vector paths, and more.

 

The Photoshop family of apps brings the power of Adobe digital imaging to mobile devices with the full compatibility of Photoshop and Lightroom:

MAX_3_MixAdobe Photoshop Mix—Now available for both iPhone and iPad, it includes amazing new technology with a cut-out option that automatically creates a selection for the primary element in an image.

 

MAX_4_SketchAdobe Photoshop Sketch—Draw with new expressive brushes as well as custom brushes, and send sketch artwork to Photoshop as a PSD file, opening the door to deeper integration between Sketch and Photoshop CC.

MAX_5_LRLightroom mobile—Builds on the amazing image management and editing capabilities… view comments and favorites in Lightroom mobile that clients, friends, or family leave on the photos you’ve shared online in Lightroom on the web.

 

The Premiere family now has a mobile app for video editing on the go:

MAX_6_ClipAdobe Premiere Clip—Our first video-editing app brings the power of Adobe Premiere Pro CC to mobile. It works on iPhone and iPad and integrates with Premiere Pro CC on the desktop for professional editing and finishing.

 

We’re also really excited about a new family of mobile apps for capturing inspiration on the go and dropping them directly into your creative workflow:

MAX_7_ColorAdobe Color CC (formerly Adobe Kuler)—Create color themes on your iPhone from the photos that inspired them.

 

MAX_8_BrushAdobe Brush CC—Transform images on your iPhone and iPad into unique brushes for Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC or Photoshop Sketch.

 

MAX_9_ShapeAdobe Shape CC—Turn shapes and objects from high-contrast photos on your iPhone into editable vectors for use in Illustrator CC and Illustrator Draw.

 

Updated desktop apps & services make it all easier

MAX_10_PhotoshopPhotoshop CCNew 3D printing features, enhanced Mercury Graphics Engine performance, and improved support for Touch on Windows 8

 

MAX_11_IllustratorIllustrator CC—A new Curvature tool, and new Touch support for Windows 8 devices like Microsoft Surface Pro

 

MAX_12_InDesignInDesign CC—Interactive EPUB support and a new Color Theme tool

 

MAX_13_MuseAdobe Muse CC—SVG support and Synchronized Text

 

MAX_14_PremierePremiere Pro CC—Search Bins and GPU-optimized playback

 

MAX_15_AfterEffectsAfter Effects CC—An enhanced 3D pipeline and HiDPI support

 

MAX_16_DreamweaverDreamweaver CC—Expanded Live View and Creative Cloud Extract (read on for details)

 

MAX_17_FlashFlash Pro CC—Improved WebGL support and custom brushes

 

  • Creative Cloud Market—A collection of high-quality, curated content that’s free to Creative Cloud members. Access thousands of patterns, icons, brushes and vector shapes to add to your own projects.*
  • Creative Cloud Libraries—A powerful asset management service, connected to your Creative Profile, that facilitates a seamless workflow between our desktop and mobile apps. Save favorite colors, brushes, text styles, graphics, vector images, and content from Creative Cloud Market into one of your Libraries, and those creative assets will be available to you as you work across Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, and our mobile apps.
  • Creative Cloud Extract—Simplifies the comp-to-code workflow by making it a snap to extract design information (like CSS, colors, gradients, measurements, and fonts) from a PSD file. Extract works right inside of Photoshop CC and Dreamweaver CC, or can be accessed in Creative Cloud Assets where your files are stored.

The power of community

The Behance community has grown by leaps and bounds since joining the Adobe family, and now has over 4 million members with more than 20,000 new portfolio projects and “works in progress” published every day. The new Creative Talent Search from Behance connects creatives across the globe with job opportunities from top companies and major brands. Just one more great reason to join Behance if you haven’t yet.

A big investment in training

The pace of innovation in Creative Cloud tools and services is growing fast. So the Creative Cloud Learn team has stepped up its game to keep you on top of your game. Hone your skills with hundreds of tutorials that cater to every experience level. The how-tos are viewable in your browser, on your iPad, and some are available inside your Creative Cloud desktop apps.

 

There are some amazing new things in this release. And you can see it all, just as it unfolded, from center stage in the Adobe MAX 2014 Day 1 launch keynote, now available on demand. Watch the new mobile apps in action and see how they connect with the desktop apps and services through your Creative Profile—your creative identity within Creative Cloud.

Get your hands on the newest Creative Cloud apps, features and services available today. If you’re already a member, it’s time to update Photoshop and your other apps. And if you’re not a member yet, join us for the journey.

*You must be a paid member to access Creative Cloud Market assets; Creative Cloud Assets are not included with Creative Cloud photography plans.

9:49 AM Permalink

Gone Girl Marks Yet Another Milestone for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

David Fincher crafts a thriller with a talented team of artists and Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

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If the first film review in Variety is any indication, Director David Fincher’s film adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestselling novel Gone Girl will be well worth the price of admission. Many filmgoers will see the movie because they like the actors, the genre, or because they’ve read the book. Many others will go because they love Fincher’s vigorous storytelling, his impeccable pacing, and his striking visual style.

Whether the audience is conscious of it or not, it is Fincher’s careful structuring of narrative and imagery that makes his films so powerful. Gone Girl is the first Hollywood feature-length film cut entirely in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Fincher is a director known for pushing technology to the edge. To help realize his ambitious vision for Gone Girl, he shot the film with a RED Dragon camera in 6K and assembled a top-notch post-production team. Two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter, ACE, edited the film with help from an editorial department that included Tyler Nelson, his long-time assistant editor. Peter Mavromates worked as post-production supervisor, while Jeff Brue of Open Drives was the post-production engineer. Fincher had worked with the group before, but the decision to use an integrated Adobe workflow with Adobe Premiere Pro CC at the hub, was a first for the tech-savvy director.

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After successfully cutting a Calvin Klein commercial with Premiere Pro CC, the team set out to determine what it would take to support the demands of a two-and-a-half hour feature film using the same Adobe workflow. Brue was tasked with designing the storage system that would enable Premiere Pro  to work smoothly within a demanding 6K production pipeline.

“Our goal was to get as many iterations as possible of the opticals and visual effects in a given period of time to make the story as strong as we could,” explains Brue. “The ask was for nothing less than perfection, which pushed us to do better. When it came down to it, Adobe Premiere Pro CC was faster than anything else in the market. That speed meant more iterations, more time to work on a shot, and more time to perfect an edit.”


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Having worked on previous Fincher projects, Mavromates comfortably assumed the role of managing the pipeline, helping determine the post-production goals, and guiding the visual effects work. With a plan in place, Baxter got started on the edit, working closely with Fincher and relying on Nelson and others on the editorial team to navigate the technicalities of working on such a cutting-edge pipeline.

“Working with the Adobe engineers was probably the best development experience I’ve ever had,” says Nelson. “Everybody was in tune with what was going on and we always had this amazingly collaborative environment. It wasn’t just about making our movie the best movie it could be, we wanted to make every movie cut on Premiere Pro in the future the best movie it could be.”

Fincher shot in 6K with multiple takes, giving the team plenty of material to work with. With a gift for bringing out the best in everyone on a project, it would be easy to assume that the film is comprised of only “perfect takes.” In fact, 80% of the shots were enhanced in some way, from reframing and stabilization to split-screening to remove an extra breath.

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The result, after a lot of meticulous detail work, is a film where every shot seems flawless. As the Variety review says, “…editor Kirk Baxter cuts the picture to within an inch of its life while still allowing individual scenes and the overall structure to breathe…”

“On every film we face the challenge of reducing the screen time without losing content,” says Baxter. “If we don’t have to cut out lines, but instead remove time from a scene by making invisible edits, that’s a win. The way David overshoots the frame in his films allows me to edit within the shot, then I throw it to the guys to sew together in After Effects, make it spotless, and stabilize the shot. That way David can judge the shots by the performance and delivery, rather than making comments on the technical aspects.”

Much of the visual effects work was done in-house, which allowed the team to work iteratively, in parallel with the editing. For example, Baxter could edit in Premiere Pro while others worked on shots in After Effects. The saved compositions would automatically update in Baxter’s timeline thanks to Adobe Dynamic Link. This integrated and interactive workflow kept shots looking cleaner and eliminated distracting back-and-forth discussions so the entire team could focus on the story as it took shape in the edit bay. This streamlined workflow was one of the main advantages for “Team Fincher.”

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“On Gone Girl we managed to do a huge number of effects shots, probably more than 200, in house thanks to the tight integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects,” says Mavromates. “I don’t think the average viewer will think of Gone Girl as a visual effects movie. However, when you look closely at David’s movies he is playing little visual tricks and we are doing brass polishing on a significant number of shots.”

This talented group of self-described perfectionists, supported by a gifted and driven post-production team, put the Adobe video workflow through its most rigorous use case to date with great success. Now, with the hard work behind them, they can sit back and watch their months of work unfold for theater audiences around the world.

Check the Adobe Premiere Pro blog next week for in-depth interviews with Kirk Baxter, Tyler Nelson, Peter Mavromates, and Jeff Brue about their work on Gone Girl.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud.

11:09 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud Learn’s Enhanced Search Pilot

Find the right tutorial. Faster.

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We’ve got almost 1,000 Creative Cloud app tutorials. Until now, they’ve been difficult to find. This summer, the Learn team built a completely new tutorial search experience to help you get what you need faster. Today we’re excited to announce a complete redesign of tutorial search.

Search that’s easy to get to from every tutorial page

Our search results have been totally redesigned to help you decide which tutorial works the best for you. On the results page you’ll find a whole new look.

Each search result includes:

  • Tutorial description
  • Tutorial type (video, text, hands-on, game)
  • Duration (length of the tutorial or time to complete a hands-on project)
  • Apps covered
  • User level

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There are also new filters to refine searches:

  • App search defaults. Based on the product page you came from; apps can be added, changed, or removed.
  • New features. Looking for recent app changes? Filter for the latest updates.
  • Level. Look for tutorials that match your experience.

What if you can’t find what you’re looking for?

Don’t despair. This new search index only includes the tutorials. We’ve got thousands of help and troubleshooting articles in our main search index. If tutorials aren’t the Learn/Help content you’re looking for, there’s always the ability to access global search from the main Learn & Support page.

We plan to expand this new experience in the future to include all Learn & Support content. In the meantime, let us know what you like, what you don’t like, and what you think.

10:23 AM Permalink

Expanding A Creative Portfolio

Creative production agency Wellcom Worldwide accesses more applications and regular software updates with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

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Leading creative content creation

Wellcom Worldwide is a leading global production agency, servicing clients with quality creative and innovative technology that make meaningful connections between brands and their customers. The company’s services include graphic design and cross-media adaptations, 3D and 2D illustration, photography and creative retouching, online and digital services, TVC production, video and animation, pre-media, image and asset libraries, and online workflow processes.

The company has transformed from a relatively small private company with 12 employees in 2000 to a global entity supported by a talented team of approximately 430 staff in 2014 with offices in Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, Auckland, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, London, Los Angeles, Columbus, and New York. Wellcom strives to be a leader in the creation and distribution of content quickly and easily in any part of the world and uses Creative Cloud for enterprise to support its vision.

A simple transition for global workforce

The switch to Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise was a natural progression for Wellcom. The company has used Adobe products to create its content since the early days of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, and has always paid attention when Adobe introduces new solutions. Today, Wellcom uses Adobe Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC for video production, produces all page content with Adobe InDesign CC, and uses Adobe Illustrator CC for packaging design. Adobe Photoshop CC remains the primary application for retouching, adjusting color, and image editing.

While the creative products have always worked well, to control costs the company typically limited the number of products it purchased. When Adobe Creative Cloud was introduced, the additional benefits and access to the full collection of applications was very appealing. Based on the ability to more easily manage licenses and receive regular updates to Adobe products, the company made the decision to transfer its existing enterprise licenses to Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

“Adobe Creative Cloud was really too good to ignore, and it was a seamless transition to switch our existing licenses to Creative Cloud for enterprise,” says Shaun Gray, information technology, product and customer support manager at Wellcom.

It was a simple transition, managed internally with minimal disruption to the business. Wellcom purchased 450 seats across its international offices and has access to many more applications that it hadn’t traditionally used, such as Adobe Edge Animate CC for creating animated banners and Adobe Muse CC for designing websites.

Expanding skills with new tools

Since making the switch, Wellcom has enjoyed the additional benefits that Creative Cloud for enterprise offers. Using the Enterprise Dashboard, the company can more easily manage licenses, expand the number of seats as needed, and true-up on an annual basis.

“The significant difference with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise is how much simpler it is to manage our licenses,” says Gray. “We’re always on the hunt for acquisitions, and with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise we can easily add additional seats if and when we need them with a clear understanding of cost.”

The ability to pay an enterprise license fee for all of the applications in Creative Cloud gives Wellcom’s staff to access applications they have not traditionally used. By expanding their skills with new applications in Creative Cloud for enterprise and new technologies such as Adobe Digital Publishing Suite, the company is winning business in areas it didn’t previously support.

“We’re encouraging creativity through the exploration of alternate ways of creating content,” explains Gray. “With Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, staff can access the applications from a secondary computer at home to continue to build their skills, and then apply their new knowledge to professional projects.”

Wellcom is also taking advantage of the storage and file syncing capabilities in Creative Cloud. “Being able to store and sync files to Creative Cloud, combined with the large storage per seat, gives us a powerful tool that we didn’t have before.”

Increasing efficiency across devices

Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise will continue to be a critical part of Wellcom’s business operations. The company uses the built-in Creative Cloud storage to enable employees to share and access content, such as imagery and photography, from anywhere on mobile devices. Designers also use applications in Creative Cloud to adapt traditional print content for viewing on tablets and smartphones.

“The ease of accessing content across devices using Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise will be great for staff out of the office,” said Gray. “Adobe Creative Cloud is a critical part of our business and will continue to be the enabler of our creative content development.”

Read the Wellcom Worldwide case study.

11:51 AM Permalink

Surface Design: The Art of Jenean Morrison

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When we asked painter/illustrator/textile designer Jenean Morrison to join us at Adobe MAX this year as a MAX Insider, we knew that she’d been using our mobile drawing apps to supplement her drawing/doodling/sketching habit. We had no idea, however, how often she used them nor how prolific she is.

It’s a love affair that began this year, in late spring, when Jenean, a long-time Adobe Illustrator CC user, picked up an iPad Air, a stylus, and started using Adobe Ideas to sketch wherever and whenever the mood struck. She was hooked. The artist, as she’s mentioned on her blog, likes to start her mornings making art: “If I’m in the middle of a painting, I like to jump right into it first thing with a cup or two of coffee. If I’m not working on a painting, then I usually sketch or make some patterns—or both.”

From Ideas to Illustrator CC:

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By July, Jenean was “head over heels” about her newly adopted creative process and had added Adobe Line and Adobe Ink & Slide to her creative toolkit. She began experimenting more and more with the potential of the apps and has become particularly fond of Line. Although designed for precise drawing and drafting, Jenean appreciates “the organic results from loosely playing with shapes and color.”

Sketching on her iPad has become a daily occurrence that she attributes to being enamored with her new drawing tools. In a July 24 blog post she wrote, “It’s so interesting how sometimes new tools—be they apps, devices, or something as simple as a new paintbrush or pen—can inspire you to do new things with your art.”

Using Adobe Line along with Ink & Slide:

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Jenean continues to use Line’s in-app tools to experiment with drawing techniques—erasing work she’s already done or putting a lighter color on top of a darker one—that she “could never do on paper.”

And, appreciating the freedom that comes with designing on a mobile device, she’s begun creating versions of images that before now she’d created using Illustrator CC. Experimenting with various combinations of freehand drawing, Ink & Slide, and the drafting templates in Line, she gets a pleasant mix of freeform lines and digital details.

Jenean’s new way of working gives her patterns, designs, and geometric prints new dimension and a new look:

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Jenean wasn’t an early adopter of drawing digital on mobile; now it sounds as if she wishes she hadn’t waited so long… “I resisted buying an iPad for the longest time. I just didn’t see the need for it in my life. When I finally got one several months ago, I realized I’d been missing out on a whole new wonderful way of creating art! I had no idea how much I would enjoy this.”

See so much more of Jenean’s work on her Instagram along with occasional insights into her inspiration and her process:

"Watching The Great Gatsby—what a gorgeous movie! Here's a pattern I'm working on inspired by Daisy's scarf. #ipadsketch #adobeline #surfacedesign"

“Watching The Great Gatsby—what a gorgeous movie! Here’s a pattern I’m working on inspired by Daisy’s scarf. #ipadsketch #adobeline #surfacedesign”

"Creating a palette for my next #ipadsketch. This is how I start most of my sketches. Once I get the colors just right I erase the scribbles and start the design! #adobeline #surfacedesign"

“Creating a palette for my next #ipadsketch. This is how I start most of my sketches. Once I get the colors just right I erase the scribbles and start the design! #adobeline #surfacedesign”


This article was compiled from a series of posts on Jenean Morrison’s website and Instagram.

12:54 PM Permalink

The Technological Artistry of Obscura Digital

This creative technology studio designs high-impact displays and improves software management with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

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Investing in multidimensional experiences

Combining innovative technology with unique creative expression, Obscura Digital designs and develops immersive and interactive experiences for events worldwide. Unlike traditional digital agencies that focus on works for print or screen, Obscura specializes in interactive installations, engaging stage shows, and mapping video that turns nearly any surface—from an outdoor sculpture to an entire building—into a video screen.

“We focus on nontraditional mediums and work with people from a wide variety of backgrounds: musicians, artists, and technicians,” says Barry Threw, director of software at Obscura Digital.

For the grand re-opening of the San Francisco Exploratorium, a unique museum dedicated to science, art, and human perception, Obscura manufactured a series of miniature replicas of the building’s façade to capture unique video, including fluid dynamics, microorganisms, and living systems in high-definition, time-lapse video. At the opening, Obscura seamlessly mapped the video onto the front of the building.

The grand re-opening event for San Francisco's Exploratorium.

The grand re-opening event for San Francisco’s Exploratorium.

“When we work with such large canvases, we need to start with ultra-high resolution images,” notes Threw. “Adobe creative software is not only an industry standard, it efficiently handles high-resolution outputs when other software can’t.”

Obscura used Adobe Premiere Pro to create and quickly edit proxy footage, and switched to Adobe After Effects for color correction, transitional moments, speed ramping, and master outputs. Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop were used for template creation and image cleanup, while Adobe Bridge assisted with overall file management and metadata annotation.

Delivering agility

Obscura, part of the Society of Digital Agencies (SoDA) and an Adobe agency partner, recently purchased Creative Cloud for teams through Adobe.com. “We’ll often bring someone in on short notice to create or revise assets as client specifications shift,” says Threw. “With access to the full collection of creative apps, Adobe Creative Cloud for teams supports greater scalability and enables us to change creative direction or take work wherever it needs to go—something we couldn’t do as easily before and respond to client needs almost instantly, right in the field.”

Obscura Digital's mapped architectural projection stage set for the Beats Antique “A Thousand Faces."

Obscura Digital’s mapped architectural projection is part of a stage set for the Beats Antique “A Thousand Faces” tour.

Centralizing license management simplifies administration, making it easy for Obscura to redistribute licenses as they are needed for various projects. “With Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, we can manage licenses very easily through the Admin Console,” says Vlad Spears, a technologist at Obscura Digital. “We always know who has what software, so we can adjust assignments as needed across project teams and contractors.”

Creative Cloud for teams also puts users in charge of software updates and installations, further reducing the workload for IT. Since teams often work in the field to help bring exhibit installations to life, this easy-to-manage self-service model enables users to add secondary installations of the Creative Cloud apps to home computers or laptops.

Obscura Digital's elaborate projections illuminate the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi.

Obscura Digital’s elaborate projections illuminate the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi.

“If someone is working on the road and suddenly realizes that they need another application, they can use their existing Creative Cloud membership to install the applications themselves without IT scrambling to provide them additional installers or serial numbers,” says Spears. “The flexibility we have in managing licenses now with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams is light years better than what we were doing before.” Obscura plans to expand use of Creative Cloud for teams with more licenses purchased through Adobe.com.

“Our purchase of Adobe Creative Cloud for teams via Adobe.com was extremely smooth,” says Spears. “And, by working with our annual membership on a monthly basis, our finance group has a much easier time forecasting costs and building budgets. We are thrilled to be on this new path with Adobe.”

Read the Obscura Digital case study.

2:30 PM Permalink