Adobe Systems Incorporated

Malcolm Gladwell, Stefan Sagmeister, and Adobe

HOW Design Live 2014: Five days of design; one extraordinary experience. Beginning with Malcolm Gladwell. Ending with Stefan Sagmeister. Adobe all the days in between.

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Malcolm Gladwell kicks things off

In a conversation with DeeDee Gordon, Malcolm Gladwell will kick-off HOW Design Live and set the tone for the conference. Drawing on history, politics and business, both past and present, his recent book David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants uncovers the forces that shape success. Its message—use what you’ve got—could be considered a rallying cry for designers to focus their energy, insight, and creativity in the face of bad briefs, difficult clients and creative blocks. Malcolm Gladwell takes the stage Monday May 12 at 4:15PM.
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Stefan Sagmeister wraps it up

Designer Stefan Sagmeister is devoting his closing keynote to topic of Design and Happiness. Sagmeister, founded his New York studio in 1993; when not designing, or teaching at New York’s School of Visual Arts, Sagmeister devotes time to understanding what makes his work successful and worthwhile. His work sparks curiosity, affects change and alters opinions and his insight into what it takes to be fulfilled, satisfied and, yes, “happy,” and to do work that’s meaningful and impactful provides a prompt to take breaks when necessary, generate ideas when there are no deadlines, and gather inspiration from every source. Don’t miss his talk Friday May 16 at 11:00AM.
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Adobe rounds things out

Adobe will be in the middle of things, throughout the conference, with a booth, product experts, and evangelist-led sessions. We’ll be teaching attendees about Creative Cloud, highlighting the newest features of our design tools, answering any and all product questions, and giving away prizes and chances to win Creative Cloud memberships. Most importantly, though, we’ll be showing how the tools in Creative Cloud can alter creative approaches, processes, and ultimately creative output.

Everyone knows it takes more than three to create a conference: A memorable event requires educational sessions and inspiring speakers and new insights into tools and techniques. HOW Design Live always has it all. So join us. Five days of design; one extraordinary experience. #AdobeHOW

Join us at HOW Design Live
Follow along on Twitter and Facebook

7:23 AM Permalink

Recreating Reality with Visual Effects

Seamless visual effects for The Wolf of Wall Street created with help from Adobe After Effects CC and Adobe Photoshop CC.

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Paul and Christina Graff of Crazy Horse Effects (CHE) are visual effects aficionados, with projects to their credit such as There Will Be Blood and Life of Pi. They also work with some of the best matte painters and designers in the visual effects industry, and are recognized for their award-winning compositing. Most recently they created the seamless visual effects for The Wolf of Wall Street, directed by Martin Scorsese, with Oscar-winning VFX supervisor Rob Legato overseeing the shots.

Adobe: How did you become involved with The Wolf of Wall Street?
Paul: I actually met Rob at a panel presenting outstanding work in VFX done in After Effects. We went to have a drink afterwards and he asked me about our new office in New York. We had worked on The Aviator and Shutter Island with him and he thought we could help with some of the shots in The Wolf of Wall Street. We were stoked to reunite with Rob, and excited to work on the project—although we joined the team late in the game when most of the effects were already well underway.

Adobe: What type of work did he send your way?
Christina: We didn’t do any of the normal set extension work we usually do. Instead, we focused on a lot of last minute fixes and designed several sequences. We worked on a lot of quirky shots! We contributed to several corporate identity “videos,” a few driving scenes, and a longer sequence with the real Jordan Belford at the end of the movie. Our work is really scattered throughout the movie.

Adobe: What sequences stand out ?
Christina: We had a great scene to work on where Leonardo DiCaprio’s character is dizzy on Quaaludes and stumbles down a staircase at his country club. The actual set had only four steps, but from Leonardo’s Quaalude-induced point of view the staircase appeared much longer. Rob had a version of the same staircase built that was much longer surrounded by green screens. This set was a bit bouncy and needed attention. Our job was to connect the extension stairs with the original set environment and make the staircase appear sturdier by rebuilding them digitally and blending everything together. We rebuilt the scene using a 2.5D set up in After Effects CC. We also extended the country club in the establishing shot that looks up to the top of the stairs. In the end, it looked believable, as if it really happened. On other projects, we’re also using a lot of the 3D capabilities of CINEMA 4D—its integration with After Effects CC is allowing us to do 3D work with much greater speed and ease.

Adobe: What were some of the biggest challenges you faced?
Paul: There is a corporate identity video playing at the beginning of the film and we had to recreate all of the stock exchange footage in that scene from scratch. We had some NTSC material that was very low quality and we basically needed to recreate the shots avoiding any copyright issues. Rob shot extras on green screen and we did our own mini VFX shoot in our New York office and used Adobe Photoshop CC to create matte paintings for the background. We only had about two days to do it and it was very challenging… but creating environments is one of our strengths.

Adobe: Were any particular features of After Effects CC helpful?
Paul: For one shot on a yacht, we had to recreate the floor and the reflections on the floor, including replacing a diamond-shaped logo. The shots we had to work with were created using a Steadicam stabilizer, but they weren’t quite steady enough. Based on Rob’s suggestion, we used the Warp Stabilizer in After Effects CC, and were impressed with the results. We’ve since started using Warp Stabilizer on more shots.

Also, the dwarf toss scene was shot spherical on Alexa, so we had to match it to the rest of the sequence that was shot on film with anamorphic lenses. It was quite tricky to get the texture of the files to look close to identical; we didn’t use plugins, we just relied on curves, blurs, and displacement maps in After Effects CC to achieve the desired look.

Adobe: What was it like coming in so late on a project? How did you succeed?
Paul: We came in late, but all of our work was high quality with a fast turnaround so Rob kept giving us bigger and bigger pieces of the pie. The Wolf of Wall Street included some content that was considered inappropriate by the Motion Picture Association of America. In the last phase of post production, Rob asked us to go on site at Deluxe Labs in New York, where the final DI color corrections were being done, to help them with some fixes to make the film more commercially appropriate. I went to Rob’s office at Deluxe and set up an iMac with After Effects on it and started working. In one day we did sixteen retiming shots and one scene where we placed a chair in a scene to block some of the content. For me, it’s all about the finishing. You really show your colors at the end of a movie, and anything that came up last minute we knocked out.

Adobe: What was the benefit of working with Creative Cloud?
Christina: Creative Cloud lets us be super mobile. We can do what we do from anywhere—in the field, on site, or in the office.

Adobe: What was it like working with Rob Legato again?
Christina: He’s a genius, one of those people who has creative vision but also knows technology. He has fantastic concepts and vivid mental images, but also gives his VFX artists the freedom to devise their own ways of doing things.

See the best of Crazy Horse Effects
Learn more about the video apps and services in Adobe Creative Cloud
Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud

10:23 AM Permalink

Typekit: Extending Its Desktop Font Library to More Customers

TypekitBlog2 Starting today, all individual Creative Cloud members at all plan levels—including free trial memberships—will be able to sync fonts to their desktop applications. That means more than 130 great fonts to use in your favorite desktop apps, including Creative Cloud trial apps, older versions of the Creative Suite, and even non-Adobe applications.

 

Learn more about this collection of free desktop fonts and how to get started with Typekit on the Typekit blog.

From the League of Movable Type: League Gothic and Raleway; two typefaces available for desktop use from Typekit.

From the League of Movable Type: League Gothic and Raleway; two typefaces available for desktop use from Typekit.

 

9:30 AM Permalink

New White Paper on Creative Cloud for Teams Security Architecture and Functionality

At Adobe, we take the security of your digital experiences seriously. 

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This white paper describes the proactive approach and procedures implemented by Adobe to increase the security of your Creative Cloud experience and data.

The paper provides details related to the security architecture and functionality available in Creative Cloud for teams. It also outlines the security policies and practices implemented by Adobe and our trusted partners as part of the ongoing development of Creative Cloud. From our rigorous integration of security into our internal software development process to the tools used by our cross-functional incident response teams, we strive to be proactive and nimble.

Security threats and customer needs are ever-changing; we’ll update the information in this white paper as necessary to address these changes.

 

9:00 AM Permalink

Beyond Technique or Medium

When Pawel Nolbert started sketching and drawing as a schoolboy in Wieruszow, Poland, his parents encouraged his creative passion by buying him a computer. Although he admits using it for video games at first, a friend soon introduced him to Adobe Photoshop. That was the spark that launched Nolbert toward becoming an internationally recognized designer and art director whose marquee clients include Nike, Sony, and Mercedes-Benz. Recently featured as one of Adobe’s New Creatives, we took the time to learn a bit more about his background and approach to design.

Adobe: What was your introduction to graphic design?
Nolbert: In the beginning, I was really interested in customizing operating systems, creating wallpapers, “skins,” and different looks—like the ways you can customize desktops in Windows. Then, around 2001, a friend showed me Photoshop; I didn’t really know it existed before then. I was playing with other software at the time, but when I saw the possibilities of Photoshop, I quickly forgot about the other software.

I mostly worked on personal, non-commercial projects and artwork. Clients started to approach me after I started publishing my work online on deviantART in 2002. My old artwork is still there, but I publish my new projects on Behance and my own website, Nolbert.com.

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Adobe: How did your career evolve from that point?
Nolbert: When I started publishing online, I got small assignments to create stickers, flyers, and so on. It quickly started growing into something bigger. I even began getting offers from agencies, but preferred to stay as a freelancer.

My style has evolved quite significantly, from an illustrative style to a mixed media style. I didn’t want to be limited by doing one strict style or type of work, or confining myself to any technique or medium. I wanted to be quite universal in that regard. So, I quickly expanded from classic illustration to incorporate more digital elements, very often including 3D graphics.

Adobe Photoshop CC is still the main tool I use every day to create. After that, I use Adobe Illustrator CC for simple vector graphics. When I was working on a lot of websites—from about 2005 to 2010—I also used Adobe Flash Professional for animation and even did some of coding, but I’m not doing as much of that anymore.

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Adobe: What types of commercial projects are you doing?
Nolbert: From the beginning, most of my work has been with advertising clients, mainly print and outdoor campaigns. Secondarily, I work on online projects. A lot of the campaigns extend to different media, so I have to blend different styles: I may paint some assets by hand and convert them to digital; or I may create 3D graphics or use scans or assets from different media to create the effects I want to achieve. Mostly, the end output comes from Photoshop.

Adobe: How exactly do you use Photoshop CC?
Nolbert: A good example is my self-portrait for Adobe’s I Am the New Creative site. It’s a mixture of photography and digital illustration. I used a photographic portrait and manipulated it to get the right proportions of head and face. Then I photographed my hands. Those were the base assets. From that point, I started to use Photoshop vector tools. I use them to maintain scalability and keep everything in control in terms of distortion.

For some reason, I prefer the simplified vectors in Photoshop to those in Illustrator. It doesn’t matter if I work on a web project or a print illustration; I often use vector tools to create different objects in my artwork. When I draw those vector compositions, I use all the textures to apply to vector elements. Then I add shading and different adjustment layers on top of that to create striking colors and compositions. That’s basically the process that I am using to create all my artwork.

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Adobe: Are you using any of the latest features in Photoshop CC?
Nolbert: I purchased Photoshop CC a few months back and one of new features that I really like is the Camera Raw filter that’s built into it. It was actually the feature that convinced me to switch from Adobe Creative Suite 6 to Creative Cloud, besides the cloud, of course, which is very convenient. What I love about Camera Raw is being able to master colors or do a basic retouch on photographs nondestructively.

Photoshop CC has a lot of features, small and big, that are really helpful. For example, the Crop tool now has a check button that lets you delete or keep the crop pixels. It’s important to have a good crop tool that lets you control your composition in simple photography and complex illustrations, and this one is much more convenient than in previous releases.

I love the new brushes; I use brushes a lot to achieve the right shading and the right finish for my compositions. The selection of brushes has been expanded in Photoshop CC and they have some new settings that let you control more of the brush parameters, which is especially versatile when using a graphics tablet.

I’m also really impressed with the optimization of the Liquify filter in Photoshop CC, too. It’s much faster and better. I use it a lot to apply distortions to photography or bitmap illustrations. When I work in a very high resolution, I like to use a huge brush size for the Liquify tool, but in CS5 and CS6 the brush size was limited. In Photoshop CC, the brush size has been increased greatly, and that is better for me when working with high-resolution imagery.

Sometimes I combine the Liquify and Warp tools. I use the Warp tool to do simple distortions, and in Photoshop CC it’s been improved in several ways. It produces smoother results than previous releases and you can now set interpolation algorithms like bicubic or bilinear for the Warp or Transform tools. That’s a really great feature—to control the output of tools in a more efficient way, especially for pixel-perfectionists.

Adobe: How else are you using, or would you like to use, Creative Cloud?
Nolbert: I really like that you can export settings with Creative Cloud applications, especially when you work across different computers. For example, I have a favorite set of brushes in Photoshop and it’s really helpful to be able to export those in a convenient way and use them on another computer.

I would also like to use Adobe Photoshop Lightroom to do more personal photography, like when I travel. I really got into photography through Instagram, mostly as a hobby. I think Lightroom can help me improve my photography by letting me manage and edit photos in the same interface. And I like the nondestructive editing capabilities.

I’ve also always wanted to use Adobe InDesign CC to work more on printed output media. I tried it a few years ago and liked it and now that it’s available in Creative Cloud I want to explore it more. I’m also excited about doing more with Adobe After Effects CC; I worked in After Effects on small projects years ago and I miss using it. Sometimes clients want to create animations, so I would love to explore applying After Effects to my projects on a bigger scale.

9:55 AM Permalink

Expert Filmmaker Builds Online Community

Pioneering filmmaker Ryan Connolly shares his passion for Adobe’s pro video software.

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After graduating from film school, Ryan Connolly started out in a fairly typical fashion: creating music videos and commercials for local clients. He then went on to run the video studio at PC game company Alienware. But rather than continue following the path of most aspiring filmmakers, Connolly came up with the idea to create Film Riot, an online show that would let him share how-to filmmaking tips, get feedback on his work, and ultimately build an audience and a community. His renegade style has earned him a loyal online following and his company Triune Films continues to produce weekly online video content as well as short films and other film projects.

Adobe: What makes you an industry rule breaker?
Connolly: My success with Film Riot lets me be my own boss and do less client work. Not that client work is bad, but at Triune Films we want to be a group of friends having fun, doing what we want to do. We’ve been fortunate enough to achieve that. We don’t have a typical day or week; it really depends on what we’re working on at the time. If things get too normal I get completely disinterested. That’s why Film Riot isn’t the same thing each time.

Adobe: Your name is associated with Triune Film and Film Riot. Can you tell us how they’re related?
Connolly: Triune Films is the parent company that produces Film Riot, along with our other programs and projects. Film Riot is an online training ground for how to make great effects, learn best practices for editing, and we also do video challenges and give out prizes to winners. For me, the big thing with Film Riot is that we’ve built an amazing community; it’s not mandatory, but it has become part of our DNA to be kind, helpful, and supportive of each other in our creative efforts—versus critical. We’ve also built a loyal following on social networks: Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook.

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Adobe: Are there other aspects to the business?
Connolly: Yes, we’ve built a brand that caters to indie filmmakers, who are a passionate bunch. We sell T-shirts, color preset packs for Adobe After Effects, sound effects packs—all kinds of things that our audience wants. We’ve also started a weekly YouTube show called Variant that focuses entirely on comics.

Adobe: Which software have you chosen to use over the years?
Connolly: After Effects has always been our go-to for visual effects. For editing, I started using Adobe Premiere Pro right off, and then switched to Final Cut Pro when I went to film school. When Apple introduced Final Cut Pro X that was the end of that.

I’m now back on Premiere Pro CC and its integration with all the Adobe software is amazing. It saves me hours every week because I’m not spending time rendering out sequences and trying to put them back in the timeline and fuss with them. The first time I saw Dynamic Link, I was amazed. If an edit to an effect is required, I just Dynamic Link the change from After Effects CC and have it flow to Premiere Pro CC automatically. The integration among all the Adobe software programs just seems to get better and better.

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Adobe: Now that you have Adobe Creative Cloud, which applications do you use most?
Connolly: My main four are Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, Audition CC, and Photoshop CC. Every now and again I use SpeedGrade CC for color correction and I’ve also started using Story Plus CC for collaborative scriptwriting, which I first tried because it was available to me through Creative Cloud; it’s the best collaborative scriptwriting software on the market, in my opinion. My designers also use Illustrator CC for title designs and so forth. I have to say, once I got Creative Cloud, I downloaded all kinds of software and kept thinking, “Wow, I can have this, too?” The choices were exciting.

Adobe: How big is your team and what volumes of content do you produce?
Connolly: Today, we have four full-time and two part-time employees. Two of us are editors and we have one VFX expert. The others are focused more on logistics such as shipping, customer service, and social networking. I’m the only all-around filmmaker. I focus on writing, producing, and editing—tossing the heavier visual effects stuff to our VFX artist. In terms of volume, we produce a lot of content between our weekly shows and other projects. We’re doing about three online episodes per week in addition to short films and miniseries-type work. We recently created a short film called Proximity. There’s always a ton going on.

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Adobe: How can your team keep up?
Connolly: A lot of it has to do with Creative Cloud. It’s so important to have everyone on the same software versions and be able to bounce everything back and forth on Macs or PCs. There are fewer kinks and version control issues in the workflow and that makes it easier for our small team to stay incredibly productive.

Adobe: How has your audience grown?
Connolly: We’re always looking at our Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube numbers. When the numbers get stagnant, we know we need to switch gears and amp things up. We experienced gradual growth for many years, but over the past year-and-a-half our growth has accelerated. During that time we doubled what initially took us three or four years to grow. We now have 441,000 YouTube subscribers and more than 66 million views of our Film Riot videos.

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Adobe: What’s next for you?
Connolly: We plan to get into more new media and online shows as well as publishing comic books. We’ll continue to create short films, but we really want to move into creating full-length feature films. For now, one of the things I find most exciting is to have the opportunity to be somewhat of an online presence. It has been exciting to build a community that is friendly, collaborative, and constructive for creative indie filmmakers.

Watch Adobe & The Frog, Ryan’s recent video produced in conjunction with Adobe.
Learn more about the video apps and services in Adobe Creative Cloud.
Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud.

8:28 AM Permalink

A Photo Plan, A Creative Campaign, and A Social Media Award

In late 2013, Adobe announced its Photoshop Photography Program. Yesterday morning, in San Francisco, at the Forrester Marketing Leadership Forum, the Photoshop Photography Program was awarded a Forrester Groundswell Award in the Business-to-Consumer Social Relationship Marketing category.

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In September 2013, Adobe announced its Photoshop Photography Program available to customers who owned Creative Suite 3 or later. The program, created for photographers, combined Photoshop CC, Lightroom 5 and Behance ProSite in a discounted bundle for $9.99 per month. The offer became wildly popular. In November 2013 Adobe opened it up to everyone.

To let people know, we used original creative and a sense of humor on our social channels. The announcement poked fun at the company’s previous restrictions on subscription upgrades and touted that, for the first time, this program was available to EVERYONE. An approachable cast of characters (sasquatch, robots and designers alike) illustrated the low barrier to entry and the cheeky, friendly approach of the social campaign caught the attention of our customers–and the members of the Forrester Research team.

Adobe’s primary business goal was to drive awareness and adoption of the Photoshop Photography Program and to reduce negative sentiment in response to the shift to the Creative Cloud business model. The program performed extremely well, exceeding (more than tenfold) initial social sales goals, engagement rates, positive sentiment, and reach statistics.

Read the details of our Forrester Groundswell Award submission and learn why the strategy and approach of the Photoshop Photography Program social campaign stood out from over 100 applications submitted from around the world.

10:16 AM Permalink

Photoshop Live–Charlie and The 3D Egg

This is the story of how one bored chick named Charlie learned how to 3D-print his own eggs using the new 3D printing capabilities in Photoshop CC; and how you could win your own exclusive egg (designed and printed by Charlie) by visiting our pop-up studio in East London where we’ll be displaying 25 designer interpretations of the egg alongside live 3D-printing demos.

Charlie and the 3D egg

Charlie, a keen designer, decided to create an egg of his own. Inspired by Behance he used Adobe Creative Cloud (and Photoshop CC) to 3D print his very own eggs. Because something worth doing, is worth doing beautifully.

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The 3D printing story

So how did Charlie print his own egg? Well, Adobe Photoshop CC can now be used to create, color and texture 3D models, including those produced in other 3D modeling programs. Photoshop CC has support for beautifying a 3D model and then printing it with amazing results. We’ve removed the complexity of the process; all you need to do is select the desired printer and material, and click print. Download a free trial.

How to get your very own 3D egg

To get your claws on one of Charlie’s exclusive 3D eggs, simply tweet using #CreativityForAll and tell us what creativity means to you. We’ll choose the best comments and send the lucky winners their own 3D printed sandstone eggs!*

25 designers and 25 eggs

Charlie isn’t the only one printing eggs. To showcase the new 3D printing capabilities of Adobe Creative Cloud, we commissioned 25 innovative designers to create their own interpretation of the classic egg. We’re exhibiting these eggs and a whole load more at our pop-up studio:

10:00 am–5:00 pm 11 & 12 April   |   11:00am–4:00pm 13 April
Shop 7, The Old Truman Brewery, 91 Brick Lane, London, E1 6QL

Come down and say hello, find out more about Adobe’s latest offerings, see a 3D designer in action, 3D printers producing eggs on demand and, who knows, maybe even Charlie hard at work…

A few of the designs we’ve seen so far (check back for updates as the eggs are printed):

Design by AnotherExample.

Design by AnotherExample.

Design by Metin Seven.

Design by Metin Seven.

Design by Craig Francies.

Design by Craig Francies.

* Terms and conditions
The competition is limited to the UK, Ireland, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Sweden, Norway Finland and Denmark and closes 9:00am GMT on 14.04.14. Prizes limited to one per person. (Details of participation.)

12:01 PM Permalink

Lightroom Goes Mobile with New iPad Solution

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We’re thrilled to announce the availability of Lightroom mobile, an extension of the photography workflow designed specifically for a mobile experience. Beginning today, you can get Lightroom mobile from the iTunes App Store and seamlessly connect your desktop workflow to your tablet (you will need the Lightroom 5.4 update for Mac or Windows).

In Lightroom mobile you can:
• Edit and organize images anywhere, anytime on your iPad*
• Enhance everything from smartphone photos to raw images from DLSRs using powerful and familiar tools
• Automatically sync all mobile edits with Lightroom 5 on your desktop
• Easily share your photos

Lightroom mobile is available to Creative Cloud complete, team, student and teacher members, and to members of the $9.99/month Photoshop Photography Program. If you’re already a Creative Cloud member or Photoshop Photography Program subscriber, Get Started Now. For more details and the FAQ visit the Lightroom Journal blog.

With Lightroom mobile, your photography is going places.

*iPhone version is coming soon.

9:12 PM Permalink

We’re Here! Team Adobe at NAB 2014

Today the Adobe Pro Video team kicks of our presence at the 2014 National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) show in Las Vegas. NAB is the biggest North American tradeshow of the year for us and we’ve been looking forward to it for months.

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The product teams have been working tirelessly on all the new features that were revealed last week and we can’t wait to show them to you. If you’re attending NAB, be sure to stop by the Adobe booth and say hello (SL3910 in the Lower South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center), check out all the new updates in the demo pods, and ask questions. We have a packed schedule on our main stage too including presentations on what’s coming next to Creative Cloud for video as well as some of the fantastic things other filmmakers, post houses, and broadcasters are doing with the Creative Cloud tools. (Hint: If you want to see zombies from AMC’s The Walking Dead, come by to see Sam Nicholson from Stargate Studios.)

Speaking of customers, I was lucky enough to moderate a really engaging keynote panel “Breaking the Rules: The Next-Gen Content Creator” at Post|Production World last weekend where customers Ryan Connolly (Film Riot/Triune Films), Kanen Flowers (That Post Show/That Studio) and Peter Salvia (YouTube Nation) talked about the next generation of media creation and bypassing traditional broadcast outlets. For more on the keynote, check our highlight video.

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In addition to Adobe’s booth at NAB—where attendees can see all the goodness coming soon to Adobe Creative Cloud for video—they can also find Adobe Creative Cloud (and specifically Adobe Premiere Pro) being demoed in over 130 partner booths across the NAB show floor. The partner ecosystem is integral to bringing the fastest, most powerful and streamlined workflows to Premiere Pro customers so its an incredibly big focus for the Adobe Pro Video team. And there’s so much more to come: The one-and-only Al Mooney will be presenting at the Las Vegas Supermeet later this week and we’ll be interviewing product team members and customers.

If you’re not in Vegas, we’ll bring Vegas to you—all week long: Stay tuned to the NAB 2014 Channel on Adobe TV for a front row seat to the latest from the show; and make sure to catch our special NAB Ask a Video Pro session on Thursday, April 10 at 10:00 am PT. Jason Levine will be demoing the latest innovations coming to the Creative Cloud video apps like Premiere Pro and After Effects during “What’s coming next in Creative Cloud for video” a one-hour overview and Q&A. Join us. Register free.

Check out our short  demo videos of the top new features coming soon to our Pro Video tools:
Premiere Pro CC
After Effects CC
SpeedGrade CC
Audition CC
Adobe Media Encoder CC

7:14 AM Permalink