Adobe Systems Incorporated

Creative Cloud: A (Continuing) Promise to Innovate

Promise_CCLogo

We’ve done it again (and again, and again, and again)… continued to fulfill our promise for ongoing innovation to Creative Cloud.

Read on to catch up on the latest and greatest Creative Cloud updates to services and apps that will help you get your creative on.

Promise_1
The new Creative Cloud Market, just released in July, is a royalty-free repository that gives paid Creative Cloud members* access to a curated collection of Behance-sourced vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and layered PSD files. Creative Cloud Market has been a huge hit because it gives members a jump-start on their designs. Find the Market under the Assets tab of the Creative Cloud desktop app.

And stay tuned: Creative Cloud Market is also coming to your browser, and Adobe’s mobile apps, starting with Adobe Sketch (read the update below).


Promise_2
Nothing’s evolving faster than 3D printing, and Adobe is in lockstep.

Just a few months after releasing Adobe Photoshop CC with 3D printing capability, we’re now providing expanded support for new 3D printers (MakerBot Replicator 5th Generation), and print services (check our current list of print service providers), and we’ve added a broader range of supported file formats including VRML, U3D, PLY, and IGES. Plus there’s now streamlined 3D painting and the ability to combine multiple jobs into a single print bed. So even if your 3D printer is slow, setting up your design will be quick.


Promise_3
Adobe Muse CC, the app that enables designers, who don’t want to learn code, to build and publish beautiful websites, continues to evolve and gather fans.

Adobe Muse now supports self-hosted web fonts, and the new Bullet Styles and Glyphs panels facilitate one-click addition of bulleted or numbered lists and special characters (such as © or ᵝ). We’ve also partnered with Google to include reCAPTCHA, a free service that uses text and number distortion to distinguish humans from bots. Now you can more easily create better-looking web pages and put the brakes on spam.


Promise_4
Finally, Adobe Sketch (now in version 1.1) keeps getting better.

The mobile drawing app, with the capability to express and connect with the broader creative community now includes free, in-app access to Creative Cloud Market so you can add high-quality assets to compositions on the go, and faster file syncing for easier sharing with Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC. There’s also finer precision when drawing shapes with more finished, chamfered corners with
Adobe Slide or Touch Slide (a built-in feature for drawing straight lines and curves without hardware).


Keep an eye on this blog for our monthly roundup of the new additions to Creative Cloud.

And don’t forget, Adobe MAX is October 4–8. Register now for the Los Angeles event and you’ll be among the first to learn what’s coming next to Creative Cloud.

 

* With the exception of the Creative Cloud Photography and Photoshop Photography plans.

12:00 PM Permalink

3D Printing: A Beginner’s Guide for Creatives

PaulBegnr_1

I’m always looking for new ways to exploit my creativity through technology—video, interactive, and mobile—but 3D printing is on an entirely new level. The fact that I can now do it in Adobe Photoshop CC is a huge bonus (watch this video to learn how). We’re able to create physical objects that never existed before; we’re inventors, a sculptors, and artists. It’s enough to give someone a god complex. If you’re anything like me, the ideas have already started flooding in; before you jump in let’s take a step back and get a general understanding of how it all works.

Additive Manufacturing

3D printing is considered additive manufacturing. It’s an amazingly simple process that consists of layers of material (plastic, wood, metal, sand, sugar, or even chocolate) being laid down in a pattern, one layer at a time, until the 3D object is created. There are three major types of 3D printing: Fused Deposition Modeling,  Stereolithography, and Laser Sintering. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages.


Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)

The most common type of additive manufacturing, FDM is easy, affordable, and can be used with many different materials. The process involves feeding a spool of filament into an extruder where it’s melted down (like a hot glue gun) and “drawn,” one layer at a time, to create a 3D shape.

PaulBegnr_2

FDM Printer
$1,000 – $5,000

Pros
Low cost with affordable filament
Large variety of materials
Fairly easy to maintain and replace parts
Fast

Cons
Nozzle clogging is common
Supports can be tough to clean
Layers can be visible (striping)

Materials
PLA plastic (starch based, 100% biodegradable)
ABS plastic (petroleum based, not safe for cookware)
Wood filament


Stereolithography (SLA)

Stereolithography is a fascinating process in which a beam of UV light draws a pattern over a photosensitive pool of liquid resin. When the light hits the liquid it hardens. Once that layer is complete the base then moves to make room for the next layer, until the 3D object is made. SLA can be really good for designers looking for extra detail, with the potential for mass production, or for anyone who wants to cast their art in bronze or some other metal.

PaulBegnr_3

SLA Printer
$3,000 – $7,000

Pros
Detail down to 25 microns (thinner than a sheet of paper)
Smooth surface details
Great for casting/molding and models

Cons
Nozzle clogging is common
Resin can be messy
Materials are limited and more brittle
3D printers are more expensive

Material
Liquid resins


 

Laser Sintering (SLS)

SLS works much like Stereolithography, but with a powder instead of a liquid. When the laser hits the powder, it hardens; the powder surrounding the object being printed acts as a support so there are no additional supports or scaffolding to break off as with the other processes. The powder is then removed leaving just the solid object, which can be plastic, metal, ceramic, or even full-color sandstone (the metal and full-color sandstone options are particularly exciting). Although there’s not a consumer printer option available, objects can be sent to Shapeways.com for printing.

PaulBegnr_4

SLS Printer
$50,000+ (although prices could drop)

Pros
Detail down to 16 microns
No support structures
Higher model flexibility since parts can be completely suspended
Working mechanical parts can be printed with no assembly required

Cons
Powder requires some work to remove
No desktop printer options

Materials
Nylon plastic
Aluminum / Steel
Silver
Full-color sandstone


 

Which is best?

SLS is the best option—despite the $50K cost of a printer—because from within Photoshop CC you can send your models directly to Shapeways.com who will print them and send them to your house. Curious about cost? A fancy iPhone case like this one cost me about $25.

Interested in buying your own? Well right now the FDM printers are the most widely available and their quality is getting really good. I personally like the Makerbot Replicator, 5th generation. Makerbot was one of the first companies to make 3D printers commercially and they are arguably the industry standard, with profiles built into Photoshop CC. I also like the Ultimaker 2 because it just feels more designer/Mac friendly and it’s open source. But what I REALLY want is the Formlabs Form 1 Stereolithography printer. It provides lots of detail, and you don’t see any of the layering lines. Plus the objects just look cool coming out of the liquid resin

9:33 AM Permalink

Photoshop Live–Charlie and The 3D Egg

This is the story of how one bored chick named Charlie learned how to 3D-print his own eggs using the new 3D printing capabilities in Photoshop CC; and how you could win your own exclusive egg (designed and printed by Charlie) by visiting our pop-up studio in East London where we’ll be displaying 25 designer interpretations of the egg alongside live 3D-printing demos.

Charlie and the 3D egg

Charlie, a keen designer, decided to create an egg of his own. Inspired by Behance he used Adobe Creative Cloud (and Photoshop CC) to 3D print his very own eggs. Because something worth doing, is worth doing beautifully.

PSLive_1


The 3D printing story

So how did Charlie print his own egg? Well, Adobe Photoshop CC can now be used to create, color and texture 3D models, including those produced in other 3D modeling programs. Photoshop CC has support for beautifying a 3D model and then printing it with amazing results. We’ve removed the complexity of the process; all you need to do is select the desired printer and material, and click print. Download a free trial.

How to get your very own 3D egg

To get your claws on one of Charlie’s exclusive 3D eggs, simply tweet using #CreativityForAll and tell us what creativity means to you. We’ll choose the best comments and send the lucky winners their own 3D printed sandstone eggs!*

25 designers and 25 eggs

Charlie isn’t the only one printing eggs. To showcase the new 3D printing capabilities of Adobe Creative Cloud, we commissioned 25 innovative designers to create their own interpretation of the classic egg. We’re exhibiting these eggs and a whole load more at our pop-up studio:

10:00 am–5:00 pm 11 & 12 April   |   11:00am–4:00pm 13 April
Shop 7, The Old Truman Brewery, 91 Brick Lane, London, E1 6QL

Come down and say hello, find out more about Adobe’s latest offerings, see a 3D designer in action, 3D printers producing eggs on demand and, who knows, maybe even Charlie hard at work…

A few of the designs we’ve seen so far (check back for updates as the eggs are printed):

Design by AnotherExample.

Design by AnotherExample.

Design by Metin Seven.

Design by Metin Seven.

Design by Craig Francies.

Design by Craig Francies.

* Terms and conditions
The competition is limited to the UK, Ireland, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Sweden, Norway Finland and Denmark and closes 9:00am GMT on 14.04.14. Prizes limited to one per person. (Details of participation.)

12:01 PM Permalink

Print 3D with Photoshop CC

PS_Learn

Modeling and printing 3D objects can seem like daunting tasks but in this new Adobe Learn tutorial, I’ll show you how Photoshop CC simplifies the process. Not only will it get  you into the exciting field of 3D design and printing but, best of all, you won’t even need your own 3D printer.

Watch three short videos, practice and print with the sample file included in the tutorial, and you’ll be designing and printing your own 3D objects in no time.

In the first video of the series, you’ll see how easy it is to convert a simple 2D pendant design into a 3D model, then customize the design to change the depth and size of the object for print.

In the second, I’ll walk you through the process of choosing different materials for your object and uploading your model from Photoshop CC to Shapeways.com, for printing; you’ll also learn how Adobe’s partnership with this 3D printing service makes it easy to upload and print 3D models and get lightning-fast delivery of your objects.

Once you’re ready to show off your designs, or get inspiration from other designers, watch the third video to learn how to share your 3D models on Behance or your own website.

Now… Grab the tutorial files and give it a try.

More tutorials from Adobe Learn.

7:52 AM Permalink