Adobe Systems Incorporated

Creative Cloud for desktop: Empowering collaboration on the go.

We live in an increasingly connected world where collaboration empowers us to work faster and more efficiently. We often need to access files, folders, and media from anywhere, on different desktops and devices, and share our work with others in any location—as quickly and as seamlessly as possible.

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Creative Cloud for desktop provides powerful collaboration features that enable you to create amazing work through connected ways of creating and sharing. It’s your gateway to managing your Creative Cloud storage, syncing and sharing files with collaborators, and getting notified about all your activities from one central location.

Read on for a closer look at these features:

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Hassle-free asset syncing

You no longer have to worry about managing assets across computers and devices. Your work is always at your fingertips. You can edit and organize work on your desktop, and seamlessly sync multiple files and folders to all connected devices—including creations that you make with mobile apps such as Adobe Illustrator Draw and Adobe Photoshop Sketch.

Syncing files is as simple as copying and pasting, or moving files to the Creative Cloud Files directory on your computer. From an app, just choose File > Save or File > Save As and navigate to the Creative Cloud Files directory on your computer. What’s more, once the files are synced, you don’t have to be online to view them.

You can view the files offline from the Creative Cloud Files directory on your computer. At any time, you can access the synced assets online by selecting View on Web from the Assets > Files section of Creative Cloud for desktop. For all the finer details on syncing and managing files, see this article.

Easy file and folder sharing

Working with teams is even easier now; sharing a folder with other Creative Cloud users takes just a few clicks. You can share a folder with specific Creative Cloud users, who can view, edit, rename, move, and work collaboratively with assets in the shared folder. Read more about collaboration in this article.

The robust file versioning capabilities in Creative Cloud enable you to keep track of updates to the shared files while allowing you revert to older versions whenever you need to. Here’s a neat FAQ that answers any questions you may have about file versioning in Creative Cloud.

If you want to share a project to get feedback on your work, you can share a link to the folder with read-only access. Sharing a link with someone, gives them a high fidelity preview of the assets directly in the web browser without requiring them to install Creative Cloud for desktop. Read more about sharing files with others in this article.

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Selectively sync collaboration folders

When you accept an invitation to collaborate on shared folders, all the folders for which you’ve accepted invitations are synchronized by default.

But don’t worry, you don’t have to stick with the default. Creative Cloud for desktop lets you selectively sync shared folders; this feature gives you greater control over what content is synchronized while also letting you conserve disk space.

Selectively syncing folders is as simple as right-clicking/Control-clicking the Creative Cloud Files folder on your desktop, and choosing Select Shared Folders To Sync. You can then select specific folders that you want to sync. For step-by-step details, see this article.

Handy preferences and notifications

The Preferences settings in Creative Cloud for desktop enable you to effectively manage your Creative Cloud storage, folder location, sync settings, and more.

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The Files panel in Creative Cloud for desktop tells you at a glance how much storage you’ve used, and the status of your file syncing.


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At any time, you can use the Preference settings to pause file syncing, turn syncing on/off, and even set the upload/download transfer speed while syncing. Notifications for all these activities are displayed in the Activity Stream of the Home panel in Creative Cloud for Desktop.


Make the most of these collaborative features and work together from anywhere. And be sure to check out these additional resources that you may find useful:

10:46 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Adobe Video Applications Updated

Creative Cloud offers pros performance and compatibility with the latest technologies.

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Adobe released updates today for its pro video applications including Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC  , Adobe Media Encoder CC, Adobe SpeedGrade CC, Adobe Audition CC, Adobe Prelude CC, and Adobe Story CC Plus. The 2014.2 release offers feature enhancements and updates, including YouTube and Vimeo uploading via Destination Publishing in Media Encoder CC for an easier, more integrated workflow when sending video content to these destinations.

The Premiere Pro CC 2014.2 update includes a number of feature enhancements for editors, including support for Arri Open Gate media, the ability to set transitions and still image default durations in either seconds or frames, and improved GoPro CineForm export. In addition, QuickTime and GoPro CineForm codecs can now be used as sequence preview file formats on Windows

The 2014.2 update of After Effects CC provides more control over text through scripts and expressions. Additionally, based on customer feedback, the team made visual tweaks to the UI such as making the keyframe icons a bit brighter to stand out better against the background.

Along with Destination Publishing to YouTube and Vimeo, the Media Encoder CC update includes updated Vimeo and GoPro CineForm presets, the option to automatically append preset names to output file names, the ability to export audio channels as separate WAV files, and more. Audition CC, Prelude CC, Story CC Plus, and SpeedGrade CC offer a number improvements as well.

Premiere Pro CC was used to edit David Fincher’s thriller Gone Girl, which has been enjoying considerable success at the box office this fall. “When it came down to it, Premiere Pro CC was faster than anything else in the market, said Jeff Brue of Open Drives who served as post-production engineer on the film. “That speed meant more iterations, more time to work on a shot, and more time to perfect an edit.” Many of the features introduced in Premiere Pro and After Effects CC were born of the collaboration with David Fincher’s post-production team on Gone Girl, including new project management capabilities and usability enhancements.”

“2014 has been exciting for us,” said Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “We kicked things off with Sundance last January and ended strong with Gone Girl. Along the way we’ve been able to add great new features, like tighter workflows between Premiere Pro and After Effects CC, an integrated editing and grading pipeline, and our all-new Adobe Premiere Clip app for making great videos quickly and easily on your iOS devices. We’re happy to round off the year with these new updates adding more functionality, refinements, and an improved overall user experience.”

Learn more about the 2014.2 updates on the product blogs for Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, Media Encoder CC, Audition CC, Prelude CC, Story CC Plus, and SpeedGrade CC.

Join Creative Cloud. Or, try it free for 30 days.

12:01 PM Comments (0) Permalink

Creative Cloud and Microsoft Surface Pro 3

The new Touch workspace in the latest release of Adobe Illustrator CC is the long-awaited return of the artist’s canvas recreated on the Microsoft Surface Pro 3.

While Microsoft Surface Pro has had the power to run Adobe apps like Adobe Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC, small UI controls (which were optimized for desktop use), and a lack of touch support made using the apps a cumbersome experience. For over a year, Adobe and Microsoft have been collaborating to bring the full power of Creative Cloud to a mobile experience optimized for pen and touch.

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New Touch workspace in Illustrator CC

Illustrator CC has introduced a new workspace designed with Surface Pro 3 in mind. This Touch workspace lets designers create on the go what they could once only accomplish sitting at their desks. This new workspace exposes the core tools and controls for drawing and editing, optimized for multi-touch gestures and a pressure-sensitive pen.

Enabling productivity in a touch environment with a complex desktop application like Illustrator CC meant rethinking it for the touch metaphor. In the Touch workspace, the user interface is streamlined to expose the most used/most needed tools and controls, with larger icons that can be easily targeted with a stylus or finger on a small screen. Common key commands, such as Ctrl-Z to undo, have been accommodated in a working environment where a keyboard may not be available, or only available as a digital keyboard that requires extra actions to open/close.

The usage data has been very encouraging with around 80% of first-time users becoming active users of the new Touch workspace. The tendency has been that once you try it, you continue to use it for creation. We are seeing exponential growth in the number of users using Illustrator CC on touch-enabled devices like Microsoft Surface Pro 3, and the Touch workspace allows users to get the most out of their investment in new hardware.

An illustrated presentation of how to draw in this new Touch workspace can be found here.

Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC: Optimized for touch and pen

With enhanced pen and stylus support in the latest releases of Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC, the user experience is better than ever, enabling users to create on the go, closer to their inspiration or while just kicking back on the couch at home.

The active stylus on Surface Pro 3 provides on hover functionality—a better user experience than what is possible via passive styli. Further, the very high-quality stylus allows creative professionals to draw directly on the device, with pressure sensitivity, thus freeing them from the typical, “look here, draw there” way of working.

Additionally, pen and touch can potentially eliminate the need to have your non-dominant hand on the CTRL, SHIFT, ALT, and Z keys on the keyboard as you use apps like Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC. The movements are now as natural as if you weren’t on a computer at all and were just doing brush strokes on a canvas.

More to come

The future offers very interesting possibilities for user interface innovation on touch- and stylus-enabled devices like Surface Pro 3 that are capable of running Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC. Watch these two videos to get a glimpse into what’s coming:

Adobe MAX 2014 Sneaks: Shaper Tool

The future of Adobe creative applications on Microsoft devices

Now, you can take that vacation in Paris and sit on the Left Bank of the Seine to create your masterpiece in an environment that allows your creative genius to roam freely and naturally.

9:06 AM Comments (0) Permalink

An Early Holiday Surprise: New Collaboration with Creative Cloud Libraries

Since the introduction of Creative Cloud Libraries at Adobe MAX in early October, we’ve been listening to your feedback and actively working to update the features you want to see.

Shared Libraries: You asked. We delivered.

We heard what our customers were saying. So we got to work. And… we have an early holiday gift for you: brand new collaboration and management features in Creative Cloud Libraries.

Creative Cloud Libraries connects to your Creative Profile, making your favorite images, colors, text styles (and more) available to you and your creative team anywhere and anytime. Easily maintain consistency with standardized and branded project assets or style guides. Create and collaborate with a library of shared assets in Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and mobile apps, and easily organize your libraries and rename move and copy individual assets in them.

Watch Paul Trani demonstrate the new collaboration and management features in Share assets in Photoshop and Illustrator using Creative Cloud Libraries then give Creative Cloud Libraries a roll and let us know what you think.

For more information about Creative Cloud Libraries, check out these resources:
Shared Libraries in Photoshop
Shared CC Libraries in Illustrator
Creative Cloud Help / Creative Cloud Libraries
Creative Cloud Help / Collaborate on folders and libraries

11:59 AM Comments (6) Permalink

Jones Knowles Ritchie, Turning Heads with Design

A leading design agency takes a brand first approach to working with clients using Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

JKR_1 From Boddington’s and Budweiser, to Heinz, Penhaligon’s, and Unilever, Jones Knowles Ritchie’s (jkr) clients are a who’s who of the hottest companies. The firm’s designers are experts in packaging and visual brand articulation—and they often work with brands globally through offices in London, New York, and Singapore.

“If a brand has visual equity, we unlock it,” says Stuart Colledge, IT consultant for jkr. “We’re brand champions and recognize that a brand is not a slogan, it’s a promise that our clients are making to their customers, and Adobe creative tools have always helped us communicate that effectively.”

Adobe creative tools have been a mainstay throughout the jkr enterprise for all phases of packaging design, from initial artwork creation to the application of that artwork on physical packaging. When the jkr IT team heard about Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, they were enthusiastic and wanted to adopt the new model to provide company-wide access to Adobe tools. The cloud-based option would allow them to equip everyone with the latest versions of the software and provide enhanced scalability and flexibility while simplifying IT administration and maintenance.

“We’re great fans of Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise—it’s a very welcome model that will make it easier for us to deploy and manage the software that our designers use to serve our clients,” says Colledge.

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Streamlined administration and the ability to scale

The IT department anticipated the significant advantages of Creative Cloud for enterprise in terms of time savings and service improvement. Setup and deployment of software throughout the company is simplified, and it’s easy for IT to add new users. In addition to jkr’s internal teams, the company occasionally works with freelancers when project quantities and demands warrant; those designers need to be working with the same software so they can integrate easily with existing teams.

The ability to provide quick and easy access to Creative Cloud supports internal growth and also gives IT the flexibility to add and immediately equip freelancers with a full set of creative tools to meet project needs. Once the freelancer’s job is complete, the license can be reassigned to another artist.

The streamlined license management enabled by Creative Cloud for enterprise means IT can concentrate on more strategic, value-added tasks rather than manually maintaining licenses and day-to-day administration. “In the past, we had to audit every machine and track licenses on a spreadsheet, which was time consuming and challenging to keep current,” says Colledge. “With Adobe Creative Cloud, we know what we paid for, who is using it, what is needed, and what we will pay for in the next round of licenses. It helps us scale as needed.”

In terms of the financial benefits of Creative Cloud for enterprise, budgeting is simpler because jkr knows precisely what it will cost to add more creative talent. IT and finance can rely on a set cost in the budget for a specified period of time. On the administration front, IT can readily deploy the products and report in to finance with exact expenses, unit costs, staff usage and turnover, as well as a justification for adding more licenses when needed.

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Creativity and productivity unleashed

Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise also benefits end users by delivering both collaboration and productivity enhancements. Designers can access just the software they want and need. The issue of having different software and incompatible file versions that disrupts the exchange of files, slowing projects and frustrating teams, is virtually eliminated for jkr’s teams using Creative Cloud.

Having access to a broader creative toolset means that users can try new things and expand their creative repertoire to provide new types of services for clients eager to engage consumers with interactive content. For IT, it is gratifying to be able to unleash new forms of creativity, without going through the process of licensing a new standalone software package.

“With Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise we can make more apps available so employees can produce more work, including digital content such as animation and video, in ways they’ve never done before,” says Colledge. “Expanding our teams’ capabilities with additional tools in Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise supports both our client acquisition and retention efforts.”

If artists have questions or issues, they can simply access online training resources or schedule an Expert Services session as part of Creative Cloud for enterprise. This ability to speak one-on-one with an Adobe product expert can provide exceptional value add for artists, and enables them to expand their skill sets quickly.

“Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise delivers services and products that not only ease our administrative burden, but they also provide a direct value add to our users,” says Colledge. “Adobe Expert Services will help our teams figure out shortcuts and achieve certain effects and outcomes that enable them to use the software more effectively.”

An obvious choice

For Colledge, and head of IT Leon Bentham, there was never a need to justify a move to Creative Cloud for enterprise. They both recognized the benefits it offered in terms of both creativity and efficiency. “Our choice of Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise was a no-brainer,” says Bentham. “Adobe creative software is our bread and butter. We need to stay current and on the cutting edge. We’ve been in this industry for 24 years, and we know a good thing when we see one—Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise is just that.”

Read the Jones Knowles Ritchie case study.

12:10 PM Comments (0) Permalink

Getting Familiar with Adobe Muse

Five feature tips for Adobe Muse CC that Joseph Angelo Todaro couldn’t NOT share.

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Designer Joseph Angelo Todaro began using Muse CC about two years ago. Not long after, he started helping other designers get up to speed with the application, first with tutorial videos on YouTube and later with Muse Resources, a library of, well, resources to use in Muse… tutorials, graphics, templates, widgets and Tips & Tricks.

MuseTips_Logo_2 We asked Joseph, also a software instructor with more than 5,000 hours of teaching under his belt, what tips he’d pass along to other designers who were using Adobe Muse for the first time. He had more ideas than we had space, but finally narrowed down his selection; what follows is his Adobe Muse feature insight and advice.

So, open Muse CC, (grab a free 30-day trial), follow along, and see how easy it is to create websites with little or no development experience.

Getting the most out of Master Pages

Websites share elements between pages—navigation, background, and branding typically remain consistent, sitewide. With Adobe Muse, these elements don’t need to be created on each page individually; in fact they don’t even need to be copied and pasted to each page individually (which would make even the smallest changes tedious). For this purpose Adobe Muse has Master Pages.

When looking at your site map in Adobe Muse, Master Pages is at the bottom. Double click on the default “A-Master” to begin editing and adding global elements. You can create multiple different Master Pages and drag them onto any pages of your sitemap to which you want to apply that Master design.

What’s cool about this feature
One master page can be dragged onto another to combine globally repeating elements with sectionally repeating elements.

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As an example, let’s look at navigation (which needs to be on every single page): Let’s name the Master containing the navigation, “A-Master” and the Master we’ll use on the other fifteen pages of the site, that will have a banner at the top, “Banner.” At this point, most users would be inclined to duplicate A-Master, rename it Banner, then edit it. Instead, A-Master can be dragged onto Banner to apply its elements. Now when you need to change navigation, background, or branding you only need to do it in one place.

Leveraging Layers

The design canvas in Adobe Muse provides a lot of freedom and the ability to interact directly with objects (selecting, moving, and scaling couldn’t be any easier), but when it comes to organizing objects, Adobe Muse has a crucial tool: Layers.

MuseTips_4a By default, a new Muse project starts off with a single layer. Using the Layers Panel, which can be turned on and off from the Window menu, you can create or delete layers using the respective buttons at the bottom of the panel. Any new object on the canvas becomes part of the selected layer and both objects and layers can be dragged and dropped to rearrange. (Note: The Layers Panel can also be used to switch between images or slides in a slideshow or composition.)


MuseTips_4bWhat’s cool about this feature
When designing Master pages, you may find that elements from other pages, such as navigation, inadvertently end up on top of Master elements. To avoid getting caught in an impossible juggle of objects, I create three layers right off the bat and use the top layer for objects that should always float above the design; the bottom layer for background elements; and the middle layer for all other page design work.


Saving and managing color

Good design is deliberate. With that comes a certain consistency. Colors, for example, should be consistent throughout the design of your site. That doesn’t mean you can’t use many different colors… it simply means you shouldn’t have 30 varying shades of blue by accident. Fortunately, Muse allows us to save colors to the Swatches Panel/Color Picker, so we can reuse the exact same color for graphics and text throughout our sites.

What’s cool about this feature
Have you noticed what happens when you double click on a color swatch? A Swatch Options box appears and enables you to name your color swatch; more importantly, though, it also lets you CHANGE the color, and every single instance of it, on the entire website. That’s huge!

Let’s say, for example, you’re designing a site for a company with an orange logo. You create a swatch of the company’s exact orange, using the eyedropper. You use this swatch all over the site for text, shape fills, and strokes. Then you get an email from the client with the subject line, “Updated Logo,” stating that they’ve changed the shade of orange. Since you’ve used the same color swatch for every orange object, you can simply double click on your swatch and use the eyedropper to pick up the new orange. When you click OK, every element connected to that swatch updates to the new color.

It’s as simple as this:

Syncing text between layouts and pages

Adobe Muse allows us to create desktop, tablet, and phone versions of our websites to be sure that our sites look great on every device. The difficult part is that it could mean designing and maintaining three different versions of the site. In a recent update to Muse, we gained the ability to synchronize the content of text boxes across pages and layouts by using the Content Panel.

The Content Panel allows you to create “Collections” (organizational groups that hold “Tags”). Tags hold individual text box content that can then be applied to other text boxes throughout your site(s). When changing the content of a text box linked to a Tag, it updates the content of every single text box connected to that Tag.

What’s cool about this feature
By adding web fonts that contain graphics as characters, graphics can be synced across your pages and layouts. My Icon Megapack Webfont is a great example; it contains 458 icons in the form of text characters.

To create a Tag, select an existing text box and click the + in the content panel beneath the Collection you’d like to add it to (you may create additional collections at the bottom of the Content Panel to help you stay organized). To apply that content to another text box, select the destination text box and simply click the name of the Tag. Boom! The content will appear in your text box and remain synced moving forward. You can also copy and paste a text box with tagged content and, since both will be connected to the same Tag, they will automatically be synced.

See how it’s done:

Recycle resources

As a professional web designer, you are most likely in the business of creating original designs for each and every client. While the overall design may need to be original, not every element of it needs to be bespoke. For example, a nice simple contact form, can be saved and reused in the future. For this, Adobe Muse has a Library Panel.

What’s cool about this feature
The Library Panel allows you to import and export your saved items right from the bottom of the Panel. Now you can begin sharing and downloading items for your Library on the Adobe Muse Exchange (or grab free content from Muse Resources).

To save something that you plan to reuse to the Library Panel, select that object on your design canvas, click the New button at the bottom of the Library Panel and give it a name. Be careful not to confuse the Library Panel with the “Widgets Library Panel” (where you’ll find the widgets that come preloaded with Muse CC). The Library Panel is persistent and the same content displays as you move between projects and the items in it can be dragged-and-dropped onto the design canvas of any site you build in the future.

How it works:

10:25 AM Comments (0) Permalink

PLP Architecture: An Innovative Practice and Creative Growth

A leading architecture studio equips its design professionals with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

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PLP Architecture’s, team of architects, designers, and thinkers value the transformative role of ideas and the capacity for architecture to inspire. The latest digital technologies, including parametric design, are integral to the creative process and the collaborative and enquiring design approach of the studio.

PLP Architecture has long worked with Adobe creative software as part of the varied range of creative software helping its design teams and specialist groups to evolve ideas and deliver successful presentations; from visualization artists who specialize in renderings and animations to 3D modelmakers and graphic designers who realize a wide range of communications material.

“Adobe software, particularly Photoshop CC, is at the center of our multiple creative workflows,” says Mark Shattock, IT manager at PLP Architecture. “Adobe software is an important tool used at all stages of the design process and to effectively present our innovative designs to existing and potential clients, consultants, planning authorities, and to both the architectural profession and the wider community.”

Imperial West Technology Transfer Building; White City, London, UK. Client: Imperial College London and Voreda Capital

Imperial West Technology Transfer Building; White City, London, UK. Client: Imperial College London and Voreda Capital

Mainstay software for an expanding design studio

Having typically purchased traditional Adobe creative software packages, PLP Architecture was faced with the issue of making sure everyone had the relevant software solutions to successfully fulfill their design activities.

The studio, limiting the number of software installations in relation to the number of licenses, had to track licenses for the software that moved from machine to machine while remaining aware of the specific applications to which the architects, interior architects, landscape architects, and urban designers had access. At the same time, the practice, having grown significantly since its inception in 2009, repeatedly acquired additional licenses that also needed to be tracked and managed.

Following a period of momentous growth in relation to a number of new UK and international commissions, Shattock considered this need for further software licenses as the opportune time to introduce a concurrent license model with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, rather than continuing to purchase earlier versions of the desktop software.

“The launch of Adobe Creative Cloud offers multiple advantages such as the ability to give everyone access to the necessary software,” says Shattock. “We upgraded the entire practice, at a key time, to Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.”

Customizable creative software packages

PLP Architecture realized that Creative Cloud for enterprise would provide the organization with simple and easy access to a broad range of creative desktop applications and services, along with license management tools and enterprise-level technical support. Creative Cloud for enterprise also allowed flexible license true-ups to simplify software-tracking and financial management tasks.

The Creative Cloud Packager allows the IT department to customize and make available software for various design groups depending on their requirements, responsibilities, and tasks while maintaining centralized control of and transparency into software licenses.

“The ability to use Creative Cloud Packager to customize software packages for different groups based on their needs is very convenient,” says Shattock. “From an IT perspective, Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise makes managing our practice systems much simpler.”

Broad access fuels creative success

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK.

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK.

At PLP Architecture, Adobe InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, and Photoshop CC are go-to tools for illustrating projects and design proposals and are used by the graphic design team to present project-specific and communications material, combining a wide range of digital and print media.

The visualization team frequently finishes renderings using Photoshop CC, and produces and edits videos and rendered animations using Adobe Premiere Pro CC (noted by Richard Woolsgrove, head of visualization, for the seamless referencing of After Effects CC files, which makes working with the two products particularly efficient) and Adobe After Effects CC.

Additionally, the software is immediately available through the enterprise license when individuals or a design team wish to explore new applications for particular activities, for example Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC. “When our graphic design team recently requested to work with Adobe Muse CC, we were able to provide the program without having to negotiate a new purchase or manually install the software,” says Shattock.

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK. Client: Victoria Circle Limited Partnership (Land Securities and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board)

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK. Client: Victoria Circle Limited Partnership (Land Securities and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board)

Promoting growth, controlling costs

The enterprise agreement has made it easier to set current costs and to forecast future expenditure on software. New members of staff may be equipped with the most suitable package and costs reconciled at the end of the financial year.

Everyone uses the same version of software, so there are no issues with collaborating and exchanging files, adding to the benefits. “The flexible license model provided with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise helps the studio respond to the different requirements of our projects and is much easier for the IT group to manage than traditional desktop software,” says Shattock. “With Adobe Creative Cloud, we always have the most current software versions and no longer have to purchase a piece of software and upgrade later. Ultimately with our enterprise agreement, we know what we spend on Adobe software each year and are able to budget in accordance with the studio’s current and projected workload and activities.”

Read the PLP Architecture case study.

5:01 PM Permalink

Moleskine + Creative Cloud: Create without Confinement

The Moleskine Smart Notebook and Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app: The raw beginning of putting pencil to paper. The precision of digital composition. From paper to vector in an instant.

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Sure, Adobe has a bunch of mobile, digital drawing apps for people to capture and create whenever they’re away from their desks. However, we also know there are people who love the tactility of drawing on paper… It’s why we’re so jazzed that paper heavyweight Moleskine has taken advantage of our Creative SDK to make it easier to move creative ideas from paper to screen.

From an analog start in the Moleskine Smart Notebook, to a digital transformation by the magic of the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app (powered by Adobe’s Creative SDK), comes a condensed creative process that turns hand-drawn sketches into workable digital files—accessible from Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Here’s how it works:

Draw: Creative journeys start with a line

Sure, it could happen at a desk, but inspiration and creativity usually spark when creative thinkers are distracted from the task at hand. The Smart Notebook provides the blank space to capture the flickers of inspiration, wherever and whenever they spark. How the pages get filled depends on the person.

So draw. Sketch. Jot. Take notes. Preferably with broad strokes (as opposed to shading) on any page. Using any tool (black ink and markers work best).

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Capture: From paper to screen

If Moleskine’s Smart Notebook is the place to collect the flares of inspiration then its Creative Cloud connected app is the bridge to move them into the digital realm.

Download the Moleskine app for iPhone then use the phone’s camera to capture what’s been put on paper. Page markers in the Smart Notebook detect the orientation of the image as well as help correct perspective and alignment distortion before saving JPGs as SVGs. Filter settings help correct poor lighting or too-light drawing lines.

Not satisfied with the result of the JPG file, before converting it to SVG? Simple. Change the settings or reshoot.

Sync & Refine: Expand the ideas

Sync with Creative Cloud to store both files (JPG and SVG) in the Creative Cloud Assets folder. Then open and edit in Photoshop or Illustrator CC (or refine and use the JPG files in other CC desktop and mobile apps). When the work is complete, step back and see how far the idea has traveled. (Give Illustrator and Photoshop CC a try. Free.)

Start drawing outside the box

Ideas are born at all times of day. In the most unexpected places. Capture them before they’re lost:
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  • Order and carry a Moleskine Smart Notebook, to capture ideas when inspiration strikes.
  • Use the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app to photograph the concepts on paper and transform them to digital files.
  • Then, sync to Creative Cloud, and import them into Illustrator or Photoshop CC to refine them and bring them to life.

Creating without boundaries. It’s that easy.

12:10 PM Permalink

An Illustrator Goes Hollywood

The anticipation and excitement of attending his first Adobe MAX inspired the art; a band and a human rights movement inspired its title. Behind Orlando Arocena’s Brave Leon art.

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It’s a certainty that anyone who’s visited the Adobe Illustrator CC Facebook or who uses Illustrator CC is familiar with Orlando Arocena‘s vector art. But when we asked him to attend Adobe MAX as a MAX Insider (someone who would share personal insights about the conference), he remembered his mother’s advice about being a good guest: “Never show up empty-handed.”

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Coupled with a bit of restless energy and a traffic jam, her advice led to a “mental sketch” just one day before he was scheduled to be in Los Angeles. Sketching in his mind is the only type Orlando does; he explained his process during a recent lecture at Pratt Institute: “Although I do a significant amount of research regarding my mental sketches, over time I realized that I wanted to eliminate the stiff rigors of the standard process of sketch, scan, trace; so I rarely do any pre-sketching on paper. I’m a big fan of energy and confidence and running with them from start to finish, harnessing the excitement of starting a project.”

Pop culture meets Hollywood icon

Fueled by music, Orlando sat down at his computer and began to draw. Six hours later his art, part pop culture icon and part Hollywood homage, emerged…

In it was a connection to location (Hollywood), and the band (Kings of Leon) he learned would be playing at the Adobe MAX Bash: “I wanted my vector to be a pop-icon parody, leveraging established elements synonymous with Hollywood that, when composed, would also represent a Kings of Leon-at-Adobe MAX-in LA gig poster.”

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Keeping the subject matter rooted in Hollywood—by incorporating Art Deco embellishments and a color palette reminiscent of Hollywood’s Golden Age—he also kept it relevant to a modern audience (and specifically to Adobe’s creative audience), with tattoos. But not just ANY tattoos, but icons from Adobe’s tools palettes. “I decided to inject elements from the tools menus that, for me, represent customization and are found in practically every Adobe application: the Fill/Stroke, the Eye-Dropper and the Arrow (depicted as a piercing rather than a selection tool).”

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The essence of an illustration

During that initial drawing session, Orlando shared his progress on his Facebook. Despite the online support and encouragement of an audience hoping he was creating a vector Wizard of Oz tribute, he stopped just short of revealing the final illustration. Instead, he put the artwork aside, deciding to finish it up the next day, just hours before his flight.

After printing two artists proofs to “get a closer look at any errors or misalignment, and to make notes of questionable areas to address on the vector file,” he printed an 18 x 24 foil print (on his own giclée printer) and took off for the airport.

It wasn’t until after Lee Hirsch, the documentary filmmaker behind The Bully Project, took the stage and touched his heart that the circumstances surrounding this personal project and the fictional character in it, came together for Orlando. He realized, “What began as Kings of Leon-at-Adobe MAX-in LA gig poster was no longer just that; it had transformed into something more. The true spirit of the image was revealed and my vector had become the Cowardly Lion who had found courage at Adobe MAX—thanks to The Bully Project.”

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That’s the story of how Brave Leon came together for this gifted artist: An invitation, a band, a movement, and Illustrator CC.


Orlando_6_AiLogoAdobe Illustrator CC. Try it for 30 days. Free. On us. Make something.

10:05 AM Permalink

How The Gone Girl Post-production Team Helped Us Deliver Better Features in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

I’ve been the product manager for Adobe Premiere Pro CC for four years and have never been more excited to work with our product teams and customers than I am now.

Most of you know by now that Premiere Pro CC was used as the exlusive non-linear editing system (NLE) for David Fincher’s Gone Girl—the first Hollywood feature film shot in 6K. While you may already know how Premiere Pro CC helped the Gone Girl team work more efficiently, you likely don’t know how working with the Gone Girl post-production team helped us build a better product.

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At Adobe, we’re committed to making a product that reflects customer feedback and needs, and we love working closely with customers throughout product development cycles. We were offered the opportunity to work with editorial royalty—two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter, ACE, who we knew would push Premiere Pro CC to be an even better NLE. Considering he works with David Fincher, a director notoriously known for pushing technical limits while filmmaking, we felt that getting this right would mean a lot for our product and our users.

So what did we do? We parked our engineers in the same building—just doors away from Kirk, assistant editor Tyler Nelson, and post-production supervisor Peter Mavromates. The engineers lived-and-breathed the movie just like the production team (and I can’t even begin to tell you how proud I was when I saw their names in the credits), working very long days, helping with workflow questions, and fixing issues as they arose.

There were a lot of features that the Gone Girl team helped us create but the top three are Render & Replace, Multi-project Workflows, and Advanced Search in timeline (all of these were recently made public in the October 2014 release of Premiere Pro CC).

Because Gone Girl was super Adobe After Effects CC heavy—a good amount of the timeline was After Effects CC comps—Render & Replace was designed to help the team speed up performance by flattening completed After Effects CC compositions into video clips (in fact the feature was finished too late to be used on the movie, so they used preview renders, but we certainly built it alongside them). Thanks to Dynamic Link, intermediate rendering was eliminated between Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC. The original comps were always accessible if the assistant editor needed to make further changes to a comp, and he could do so while Kirk continued the edit. When the comp was done, it would show up in Kirk’s timeline.

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Multi-project Workflows allowed the Gone Girl team to work concurrently on different parts of the film in different project environments. Kirk Baxter was able to open multiple Media Browser panels for easy access to parts of the project that assistant editors were working on at the same time. The new Source Monitor Timeline—which allows users to open a second timeline for media and sequences from other projects, making it easy to bring existing clips, edits, comps and effects directly into the current project—was suggested by the Gone Girl team and although the feature wasn’t available during the editing of the film, it did make it into the October 2014 release.

We also added the ability to search bins so users can generate dynamic bins based on search criteria. This enabled us to include Advanced Timeline Search capabilities as well. Search bins are updated as new content is added, so users can keep projects organized, even as new footage is still coming in.

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We also added other features such as assignable marker colors and a variety of timeline improvements that helped the team work better and faster. As we built the features for and with the Gone Girl team, we learned more about their incredibly challenging workflow than we ever considered.

All that learning and all those long hours (Thanks guys!) have helped us to build a better product, and we’re so proud of what we achieved with the input from the Gone Girl editorial and post-production team. There were some tough times—we knew there would be—but thanks to the dedicated professionals on their editing team and our engineering team, the project was a huge success, and the first of many more exciting things to come.

Last month, we hosted a panel of the team that worked on Gone Girl. Check out the Behind the Scenes on Gone Girl, which begins with a quick overview of how the tools were used.

10:18 AM Permalink