Adobe Systems Incorporated

Show Marvel Your Best Work

Are you a student looking to showcase your talent, get advice from top-tier professionals, gain invaluable real-world experience, and build your portfolio? If so, Adobe has the perfect opportunity for you:

We’ve teamed up with Marvel to make comic book history and give you a chance to apply your cutting-edge skills.

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What’s the deal?

We’re looking for four (4) students with four (4) distinct styles to team up with Marvel pros to create a limited-edition Avengers comic, powered by Creative Cloud, to debut during San Diego Comic-Con.

If chosen, you’ll contribute to the comic, get a ticket to San Diego Comic-Con, and a one-on-one portfolio review with the Marvel pros. Your comic will also be printed and distributed in comic stores across the United States. (You may also be featured on the Adobe Students social channels to help your portfolio stand out to future employers.)

Who we’re looking for

Students (in or outside the USA) aged eighteen (18) and over, who are passionate about illustration, digital media, animation, and comics.

How to be considered

Tag your best original non-Marvel work on your Behance portfolio with #madethis #Marvel. If you don’t have a Behance portfolio, you can make one by simply signing up on Behance and uploading your work.

Submission deadline

Work must be tagged on Behance no later than April 13, 2015 for consideration.

Some questions and answers

  • Who’s eligible to participate? Currently enrolled students from all majors and backgrounds. You must be over the age of eighteen (18).
  • I don’t live in the US, can I participate? Yes. The opportunity is available globally.
  • Will I be paid for my work? Yes. Each selected student will receive a cash payment.
  • Will hotel and accommodations be taken care of at San Diego Comic-Con? Yes. The selected students traveling to San Diego Comic-Con will have transportation and hotel accommodations planned and paid for by Adobe, as well as a daily stipend.
  • I’m from outside the US, will my visa be taken care of? If you’re chosen, you will be responsible for applying for your visa. It can be completed by visiting esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta and following the application directions. We will reimburse you for any costs needed to obtain your visa.
  • Do I need Creative Cloud to participate? You will need a Behance portfolio and Creative Cloud skills.  If you aren’t already a Creative Cloud member, download free trials of the Creative Cloud apps.
7:53 AM Comments (2) Permalink

HaZ Goes Hollywood with Sci-Fi Teasers

Turning proof-of-concept shorts into feature film deals with Adobe Creative Cloud.

HaZ_1Soon after its release, Project Kronos was an Internet hit on YouTube and Vimeo. Viewers loved the gritty documentary feel of the fifteen-minute short created on a budget of just £3000 by Hasraf “HaZ” Dulull entirely with Adobe Creative Cloud applications, including Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC. Hollywood loved it, too. So much so, that HaZ was able to win his first feature film deal for a full-length version of the space exploration drama.

Hollywood is a long way from the buzzing streets of central London where HaZ grew up. As a boy, his interest in cinema was first piqued by VHS videos of Blade Runner and Alien. Fascinated by the special effects, the youngster carefully reviewed scenes, trying to discern how they were created. Meanwhile in school he started playing around with an early version of the Paint application. “The school computers wouldn’t let you save files, so day after day I would create the same image, improving it as I went along,” he recalls. “I got pretty good at pushing pixels that way.”

At sixteen, he got his first computer and was soon a keen gamer. His interest in pursuing a career in game design led him to choose Computer Science, Technology, and Design for his A Level exam subjects. As part of his schoolwork, he created and animated a film using 4-bit images. From there HaZ went on to study media communications and for his dissertation on video games he created a simple horror game.

From game cinematics to cinema

That helped him land his first video game job creating cinematics, the short films that serve as introductions to video game narratives and as “cut scenes” between levels. “By now I was working with the first wave of digital tools, including Alias Wavefront for animation, Photoshop for painting, Combustion for compositing, and Avid for editing,” says HaZ.

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“After a few years, I asked myself: ‘Why am I doing this?’ Why not work on actual films,” he continues. “So I got my first film job at the Moving Picture Company in London.” Starting in 2003, he worked his way up from compositor to lead compositor, finally becoming VFX supervisor on broadcast series such as America: The Story of US (History Channel) and Planet Dinosaurs (BBC), both of which earned him award nominations in 2011.

As a VFX supervisor he was soon working shoulder to shoulder with directors. “That became my film school,” he says. “I was helping filmmakers plan their productions in a way that avoided problems in post-production. This didn’t just teach me about the process of filmmaking, it deepened my understanding of storytelling and how each aspect of a film, if done right, supports the larger narrative.”

The role of VFX supervisor is an interesting one and tells us a lot about the evolution of filmmaking today. Originally, the VFX supervisor was brought on set to bridge the gap between filming and post production. They ensured that shots were captured correctly for efficient post-production and high-quality visual effects. Sometimes VFX supervisors even directed segments themselves. But the role has grown as the place for visual effects in filmmaking has matured. “As a VFX supervisor, I’m working with writers actors, directors, producers, executives,” says HaZ. “We’ve become very influential in the storytelling process and we’re usually brought in now during development, before the script is even green lit.”

Pitching feature films in Hollywood

Meanwhile, HaZ himself was also evolving and the idea for Project Kronos was born. “Project Kronos was the right thing at the right time,” he explains. “Gravity was hitting theaters and Interstellar was in production. Space stories were hot.” Project Kronos was picked up by Armory Films and Benderspink to turn into a full-length drama with HaZ attached to write and direct. All of a sudden, he was being asked to pitch ideas for other films.

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“Now I go into the meetings as a director and a writer,” he says, “and I don’t just bring a script with storyboards. I cut a short teaser of the film to show the studio execs what the film will look like. And I’m not just showing them the story, I’m showing them how it can be made.”

The approach has worked. In short order HaZ had three films in development with a fourth in the works. “It really helps that I can knock out the videos fast,” he explains. “Once I even cut a pitch trailer on the plane, on the way to Los Angeles. It’s so easy now: boot up the laptop, open the Creative Cloud apps and just get to work.”

The process itself is not new to him, just the ease with which he can do it. “I’ve been doing proof of concept stuff for a long time, but it used to be with disconnected tools,” he says. “With Creative Cloud I don’t have to deal with that anymore. I just bring everything into Premiere Pro CC and then connect the pieces. It makes it so much easier to sell an idea when you can show it already visualized.”

Building pitch trailers with Creative Cloud

One of the new projects is called Sync. Unlike Project Kronos, which is styled like a documentary, Sync is a sci-fi thriller. “I wanted to show I could create the kinds of action films that studios are often looking for from young first-time filmmakers,” he says.

HaZ_4_Sync01

He even created a kind of pre-teaser to show potential collaborators what he wanted to make, including grading with Adobe SpeedGrade CC, to create atmosphere, and VFX created in Photoshop CC and After Effects CC. “That worked,” he smiles. “My test shots generated interest and I found my crew and actors just by showing it around.”

While shooting the Sync teaser, HaZ and his team were already doing rough assembly, which was easy, since Premiere Pro CC supports the native files right out of the camera. From there the short film was built stem-to-stern in Creative Cloud. “Adobe isn’t just creating tools, they’re creating workflows,” says HaZ. He is proud of this project, which he feels includes elements of Blade Runner, one of his first movie loves.

I.R.I.S, a third feature film project, combines the documentary storytelling style of Project Kronos with the sci-fi thriller genre of Sync. In this story, the globe is surrounded by miniature drones which, using sophisticated artificial intelligence, monitor and police human activity.

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I.R.I.S. was created using the same workflow as Project Kronos and Sync. As with those shorts, HaZ made extensive use of After Effects CC for compositing CG elements into the live action, as well as augmenting stock footage. HaZ created I.R.I.S. before Sync but it was released afterwards. “It was a project I developed with another production company in Los Angeles to pitch as a feature film,” explains HaZ. “We never intended to release this one as a short film, but after all the buzz around Sync it made sense to make this public, too.

“I asked my DP on I.R.I.S. if he could find some guys who could help out as marines in the film. When I turned up on set these guys were fully kitted out with enough weaponry to start a small war—all replicas of course! They were awesome to work with and totally loved films like Aliens, so directing them was a blast. Naturally, I used them again on Sync for much bigger action scenes.”

A playground for developing ideas

As all of these short film projects show, Creative Cloud gives HaZ a digital playground for developing ideas. The result in each case is not just a story idea, but clear ideas for how to make it efficiently and cost-effectively. For example, HaZ has made extensive use of Adobe Audition CC to map out audio for his projects. “Sound studio time is really expensive, so it helps a lot if I can show exactly how I want the audio to be done, and the audio people end up using many of the original sound elements I created,” says HaZ. “And I’m not even an audio guy!”

The design tools have also proven useful in fleshing out concepts. “For one project I was asked how I thought it could be marketed, so I grabbed some stills and designed a poster for the film,” he says. “Typekit is a lifesaver for me, too—not just for making posters, but for titling and design elements within the films. I also used Creative Cloud Assets to create graphics in Sync. I don’t want to be thinking about tools when I’m doing my work. Everything I need I already have in Creative Cloud.”

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After a year of polishing the script, HaZ is now gearing up for his feature film directorial debut on Project Kronos, which will go into production in 2015. While this will bring new experiences, he feels very much at home in the process. “I don’t need to worry about post, or editorial, because I know I have all the tools to get the job done.
 

In case you missed it… from October 2013, Creating a Great Pitch Trailer for your Feature Film, an Ask A Pro session with HaZ Dullul.

(HaZ is represented by manager Scott Glassgold of IAM Entertainment.)

3:10 PM Comments (0) Permalink

Aaron Draplin and The Collaborative Poster Project

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Aaron Draplin is joining Adobe at HOW Design Live.

And, in collaboration with Adobe and boutique printer Mama’s Sauce he’s also fronting Draplin in The Cloud—part commemorative poster design, part portrait of a new work process, and part collaborative art project—using Adobe Shape CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Draplin, along with Adobe evangelist Paul Trani will be presenting a lunchtime session titled Draplin Takes Mobile to Desktop about capturing shapes in Adobe Shape and taking them into Illustrator CC. He’ll also be presenting in the Adobe booth, a sort of reenactment of his design process.

He had a few things to say about this uniquely-challenging creative collaboration:

Draplin_1 From shape to design. We know you’ve used Adobe Shape a bit. Tell us how you see it fitting into your design process long term? I’ll sketch something and take a shot of it, let the thing show up in my Library, and will have vectors to refine. From paper to digital, a little quicker. Then I’ll grab that vector, lock it on the art board, and draw over it, refining the idea. It’s another fun way to capture an idea. But mainly, it eliminates steps for me. Instead of having to shoot it with my phone, load the shots to my machine, let the cloud grab it, and then place the shot? From four steps to one.

The assets for this poster will be a compilation of vector icons solicited and gathered from other people’s Adobe Shape CC captures. Tell us a bit about how you think that will work. The world’s moving faster and faster. I’m having to learn new ways of capturing my thoughts, based on what’s within an arm’s reach—paper, steamy shower glass, my desktop computer and, more and more, my phone. Using these new mobile apps, you can bridge that gap. Quick and clean. And I’m starting to rely on it in my process.

It will be fun to see stuff come flying in, out of my control. And then, making new out of it all. That randomness sounds fun. I’ll be at their mercy. Out of my element.

And about that… People on the Internet, whom you’ve never met, sending in submissions for you to design around; that’s a broad collaboration. Nothing can go wrong there, right? Not one thing. Ha! I mean, if it’s weird or mean or creepy, I reserve the right to hit the “delete” button. But for the most part, I anticipate the stuff being submitted with good spirit behind it. Let’s make something cool.
 

Mama’s Sauce: From Shape CC to Illustrator CC to screen print

This project wouldn’t have been possible without the participation of Mama’s Sauce, an incomparable boutique printer. Because their knowledge of hand-done print processes is profound, we dragged them into a conversation about this project and a larger one about vector-to-handmade printing:

When we said, “We want you to screen print a project that got its start on a smartphone with a mobile app,” did you want to run for the hills? No way. Screen print, letterpress, foil printing—they’ve all come a long way from painting on emulsion, moveable-type, hand carved blocks, chemical etching… you know, the historical processes of putting graphics in a form able of being printed on paper. While all of those are super viable still, each with their own purpose and/or aesthetic, these days, 100% of what we print in our shop comes from a digital or raster file. Considering that the average smartphone has more computing power than the spacecraft that brought us to the moon (you may want to fact check me), there isn’t much a phone can’t do these days. They’re certainly smart enough to produce vector and raster files. I mean, I do it all of the time with Adobe’s mobile apps. It’s crazy how I’m needing my computer less and less.

How do you feel about the concept now that you know a bit more about Adobe Shape and its integration with Illustrator CC? A light went off. I’m ashamed to admit it, but I didn’t realize that you could send files so easily right into our pre-press workflow. The idea of moving in that direction for receiving files is super appealing.

Talk a bit about how screen printing is the perfect complement to vector art and a digital process. It’s powerful when vector meets makers; and digital designers have embraced hand-made output in a big way. I don’t think anyone is forcing it either. It’s a natural fit. The more digital we get in our processes, the more people want to stay connected, not to fight progress, but to keep more options on the table. It’s happening in a multitude of ways too: People are scanning old wood type, exaggerating halftones in their designs, and creating aesthetics based on old production techniques that were once solely practical in nature. And when people wanted more out of the old presses, not just their type and halftone aesthetics, but rather the rest of their printing capabilities for their vector art… polymer plates came along. Modern plate-making for letterpress and modern film-making for screen print—these processes make old world printing the perfect complement for designers wanting to print work on a traditional press.

For anyone who might want to use a mobile-to-desktop-to-screen-print process, what’s most important for them to know?  Begin where you are. If you see something inspiring and want to know how it would look 1-color, how it would vectorize, you can snap a pic and see that nearly instantly. Gone are the days where you have to email yourself a file, drag to the desktop, open the asset and then get to work. You work can begin wherever.
 

Draplin in The Cloud: The collaboration

Aaron will select shapes from online submissions and incorporate them into a commemorative poster which will be printed in a limited run of 1,000 and given away at HOW Design Live. (Not attending HOW? Don’t worry, the poster will also be available as a digital download.)

Wondering how to get a shape on Aaron’s poster? It’s pretty simple. Open Adobe Shape. Capture a shape. Submit it to Aaron through the app. Get more details from Collaborate with Draplin… as an alternative, the process in the words of Aaron Draplin:


 

Check our microsite to see what else Adobe’s got going on at HOW Design Live.

9:03 AM Comments (1) Permalink

Google’s Mobile-Friendly Test and Adobe Muse CC

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Google recently announced a change in their site-ranking algorithm to include mobile-friendliness criteria for mobile search results, that will go live on April 21.

If your Adobe Muse site isn’t yet built to support mobile, it’s time to consider creating a tailored experience for your site visitors, whether they’re viewing on a desktop, tablet, or smartphone. Adobe Muse has the tools you need to prepare your site for this change, and ensure Google search queries continue to drive maximum site traffic, leads, and new business.

Get started with this step-by-step tutorial How to create a mobile website with Adobe Muse.

For an in-depth understanding of this change, and recommendations for creating a mobile-friendly site, read Mobile-Friendly Sites and Google Webmaster Tools on the Adobe Muse engineering team blog.

8:07 AM Comments (1) Permalink

Creative Cloud and Business Catalyst

Beginning May 1, 2015, Business Catalyst will no longer be included as part of Creative Cloud for new members. This change has no impact on current members, who will continue to have access to the service as part of their membership for as long as their membership remains active. Preview functionality from Muse will continue to be available for all Creative Cloud members.

We are continuously looking for opportunities to update our Creative Cloud offerings in order to focus on the features and functionality most requested by members. This includes adding new desktop and mobile apps, new features and services, as well as adjusting and changing the existing services and offerings. This change allows both the Creative Cloud and Business Catalyst teams to better focus their efforts on features for their respective members.

 

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An Update: Creative Cloud and Support for Mac OS X

We’re hard at work on the next major release of Creative Cloud, and wanted to share some information on updated operating system requirements for members using Mac OS X.

In order to take advantage of the latest operating system features and technologies, the next major release of Creative Cloud will require Mac OS X 10.9 or higher.

If you’re running an older version of Mac OS X, such as 10.7 or 10.8, you can continue to run and install current and previous versions of the Creative Cloud applications, but will not be able to install or run the next major release of the Creative Cloud desktop applications until you upgrade to a supported version of OS X. Apple provides a free update to the latest version of OS X (10.10).

Creative Cloud Desktop, which manages application installs, will continue to be supported on OS X 10.7 and above.

In addition, the next major release of Lightroom will be supported on OS X 10.8 and above.

Focusing our efforts on more modern versions of Mac OS X allows us to concentrate on developing the features and functionality most requested by members.

11:01 AM Comments (0) Permalink

This Week’s Creative Challenge: Explore The Blues

This month, we’re celebrating the vital role colour plays for all creatives; we kicked things off last week with our post, The Importance of Colour for Creatives.

The truth is there’s so much you can explore around it that nailing down just one colour at a time can be the true challenge. That’s why we’re big advocates of smart colour palettes and the right tools to bring them to life wherever you go, like Adobe Color CC which is available in the iTunes App Store.

BlueBlog_1 Last week we challenged you to bring a new lens to your home and find interesting or exciting uses of yellow.

This week we’re turning our attention to blue—here are a few interesting “blue” facts to get you going: blue is the eye colour of 8% of the world’s population, and from a historical point of view we didn’t speak of “light blue” up until 1915, when it was first recorded as a colour term in English. But perhaps most importantly, research has shown that blue rooms tend to make people more productive, which is why you see so much of it in offices.

So your challenge this week is to find interesting uses of blue around your workplace. We’ve included an example of how that might look, but use your imagination… photograph a colourful mug, a notebook or a simple pencil, your boss’s jacket or just a nice overall frame.

Show us that you also get the blues (in a good way) by sharing your own photos on Twitter and Instagram, and using the hashtag #InspiredByColour​.

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Colour Masterclasses in March

If you’re a designer or visual creative, colour is an important element in making your work stand out.

We discussed our own fascination with colour in a previous post, The Importance of Colour for Creatives, but now we’re taking it a step further: We’re hosting a series of masterclasses during March to explore how exciting uses of colour, powered by Adobe Creative Cloud tools, can help you to achieve amazing results.

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Let’s start with the basics

On March 18, Creative Cloud expert Stéphane Baril explored the theory of colour. Through Stéphane’s masterclass, attendees learned about principles of colour theory and how to apply them to their work with Adobe design tools, in a practical way:

Stéphane’s full masterclass is available on YouTube.

Let your colours flow

On March 25, Danish designer Maria Grønlund, who bases her images on organic shapes such as flowers, smoke and ink suspended in water, will outline the process by which she creates her amazing work through various tools in Adobe Illustrator CC during her masterclass I Speak Fluid Colours.

Maria is passionate about inspiration from colour, stating that “these are digital drawings developed primarily for aesthetics. It’s a study in colours and Illustrator CC techniques… in principle, there’s no right or wrong way to interpret the drawings. It’s a bit like watching the clouds and finding rabbits and sheep in the shapes—though [they are] created with the intention of evoking a positive and light feel.”

Register for her March 25 masterclass and listen firsthand to her amazing insights on colour.

Let’s get practical

Then, on April 1, we’re inviting worldwide design evangelist Rufus Deuchler to talk about Real-world Colour Inspiration Workflows and how to leverage mobile devices and shared Creative Cloud Libraries in desktop applications such as Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop CC.

Colour defines our world, and our designs, so be on the lookout for this exciting overview of what you can do with the power of Adobe’s creative tools. Don’t miss out on Rufus’ April 1 masterclass… Register.

What a great time to be #InspiredByColour!

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At SXSW 2015: Twice As Many Films Cut with Adobe Premiere Pro

Over 120 films at this year’s SXSW Film used Adobe Creative Cloud video applications, including 60 edited on Premiere Pro.

What a difference a year makes.

Last year at the 2014 SXSW Film Conference & Festival, a respectable 23 films had been cut with Premiere Pro CC, including gems like Evaporating Borders, by Iva Radivojevic, and The Immortalists, by Jason Sussberg and David Alvarado.

THE BOY, helmed by Craig McNeill,  premiering at SXSW 2015.

THE BOY, helmed by Craig McNeill, premiering at SXSW 2015.

This year the total has more than doubled with 60 films showing this year edited in Adobe’s professional NLE. Similar growth in Premiere Pro CC and Creative Cloud usage was seen at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and 2014 ended with a bang with the release of David Fincher’s Gone Girl, edited entirely in Premiere Pro CC with over 80% of the film’s effects assembled in Adobe After Effects CC.

“We’re really excited to see our growth at SXSW, especially given how this event cuts across genres to showcase artistry in so many different disciplines,” said Al Mooney, product manager for Premiere Pro CC. “The application is increasingly becoming the go-to NLE, both for established and up-and-coming filmmakers,” he explained. “Editors tell us they feel right at home very quickly and Premiere Pro CC’s  tight integration with other Creative Cloud applications, like After Effects CC and Adobe Photoshop CC make this an incredible creative environment in which to work.”

Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015

For filmmakers attending SXSW, Adobe will be hosting Creative Camp on Friday, March 13 and Saturday, March 14 with two sessions focused on video content creation and storytelling.

Below is a listing of films showing at the 2015 SXSW film Conference & Festival that incorporated Premiere Pro CC in their post-production workflow.

Narrative Feature Competition

  • THE BOY: Craig Macneill, director; Craig Macneill and Clay McLeod Chapman, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • Creative Control: Benjamin Dickinson, director; Benjamin Dickinson and Micah Bloomberg, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • KRISHA: Trey Edward Shults, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • Uncle John: Steven Piet, director; Erik Crary and Steven Piet, screeenwriters (World Premiere).

Documentary Feature Competition

  • Peace Officer: Scott Christopherson and Brad Barber, directors (World Premiere).
  • Twinsters: Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, directors (World Premiere).

Narrative Spotlight

  • The Frontier: Oren Shai, director; Webb Wilcoxen and Oren Shai, screenwriters (World Premiere).

Documentary Spotlight

Uncle John, directed by Steven Piet, premiering at SXSW 2015 in the Narrative Competition.

Uncle John, directed by Steven Piet, premiering at SXSW 2015 in the Narrative Competition.

Visions

  • Ava’s Possessions: Jordan Galland, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • The Nymphets: Gary Gardner, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • Planetary (UKUK/USA): Guy Reid, director; Steve Watts Kennedy, screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • A Wonderful Cloud: Eugene Kotlyarenko, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).

Midnighters

  • The Diabolical: Alistair Legrand, director; Alistair Legrand and Luke Harvis, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • Excess Flesh: Patrick Kennelly, director; Sigrid Gilmer and Patrick Kennelly, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • The Nightmare: Rodney Ascher, director.
  • Pod: Mickey Keating, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).

24 Beats Per Second

SXGlobal

  • Free Entry (Hungary): Yvonne Kerékgyártó, director/screenwriter (North American Premiere).

Festival Favorites

  • Being Evel: Daniel Junge, director; Daniel Junge and Davis Coombe, screenwriters.

Special Events

Narrative Shorts

Documentary Shorts

Animated Shorts

  • Butter Ya’Self : Julian Petschek, director.
  • Half Wet (UK): Sophie Koko Gate, director.
  • PALM ROT: Ryan Gillis, director.
  • Pig: Steven Subotnick, director.
  • teeth (UK/Hungary/USA): Daniel Gray and Tom Brown, directors.
Twinsters, directed by  Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, a documentary premiering at SXSW 2015.

Twinsters, directed by Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, a documentary premiering at SXSW 2015.

Midnight Shorts

Texas Shorts

Texas High School Shorts

Music Videos

Learn more about the pro video tools in Creative Cloud.

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The Importance of Colour for Creatives

As designers, photographers and creative professionals, we all know the importance of visual impact in our work. It is, after all, essential to communicating a message in a way that’s exciting but also effective.

During March, we’ll be exploring this topic a bit further, with a particular focus on the importance of colour for creatives.

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Colour curiosities

Colour is a fascinating subject. Not only does it bring our work to life through inspiring and balanced themes and palettes, but also helps make our lives easier by allowing us to associate complex ideas in simple and subtle ways; for example, when you see red on a street sign, it’s a signal to stop as there might be cars coming… That’s colour in action.

Even more interesting is exploring the science and psychology behind color: Did you know that research suggests men and women actually see the colour red differently? Or that colours are responsible for at least 62% of our first impressions? Or that seeing yellow and orange can actually make you hungry? It’s not hard to find these and many other curiosities around colour, which illustrates its potential to help us create amazing work with Creative Cloud.

We want to celebrate colour in a vibrant way, and invite you to join us throughout March. Here’s how:

  • Talent Tuesdays
    We’ll be actively looking for interesting artists and projects on Behance that explore colour in exciting ways. We’ll highlight one artist per week, each Tuesday. Expect a lot of interesting talent and amazing work getting the attention it deserves
  • Weekly colour challenge
    We love a good creative challenge and know you do too, so in these next few weeks we’re exploring a different point of view around colour. Each week, we’ll pick one colour, tie it to a specific environment, and challenge you to take your best shot (pun intended) in a creative way that brings that colour and environment to life.

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Let’s get started with yellow!

The first challenge is now live: We’re looking for inspiring uses of yellow around your home (like the image on the right).

Why yellow? Well, yellow is commonly associated with warmth, happiness, fun or friendship, which all sound like great things to have around the house. So time to create!
 

So, show us what you’ve got by sharing your own photos on Twitter and Instagram and using #InspiredByColour.
 
Have a colourful week!

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