Adobe Systems Incorporated

Moleskine + Creative Cloud: Create without Confinement

The Moleskine Smart Notebook and Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app: The raw beginning of putting pencil to paper. The precision of digital composition. From paper to vector in an instant.

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Sure, Adobe has a bunch of mobile, digital drawing apps for people to capture and create whenever they’re away from their desks. However, we also know there are people who love the tactility of drawing on paper… It’s why we’re so jazzed that paper heavyweight Moleskine has taken advantage of our Creative SDK to make it easier to move creative ideas from paper to screen.

From an analog start in the Moleskine Smart Notebook, to a digital transformation by the magic of the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app (powered by Adobe’s Creative SDK), comes a condensed creative process that turns hand-drawn sketches into workable digital files—accessible from Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Here’s how it works:

Draw: Creative journeys start with a line

Sure, it could happen at a desk, but inspiration and creativity usually spark when creative thinkers are distracted from the task at hand. The Smart Notebook provides the blank space to capture the flickers of inspiration, wherever and whenever they spark. How the pages get filled depends on the person.

So draw. Sketch. Jot. Take notes. Preferably with broad strokes (as opposed to shading) on any page. Using any tool (black ink and markers work best).

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Capture: From paper to screen

If Moleskine’s Smart Notebook is the place to collect the flares of inspiration then its Creative Cloud connected app is the bridge to move them into the digital realm.

Download the Moleskine app for iPhone then use the phone’s camera to capture what’s been put on paper. Page markers in the Smart Notebook detect the orientation of the image as well as help correct perspective and alignment distortion before saving JPGs as SVGs. Filter settings help correct poor lighting or too-light drawing lines.

Not satisfied with the result of the JPG file, before converting it to SVG? Simple. Change the settings or reshoot.

Sync & Refine: Expand the ideas

Sync with Creative Cloud to store both files (JPG and SVG) in the Creative Cloud Assets folder. Then open and edit in Photoshop or Illustrator CC (or refine and use the JPG files in other CC desktop and mobile apps). When the work is complete, step back and see how far the idea has traveled. (Give Illustrator and Photoshop CC a try. Free.)

Start drawing outside the box

Ideas are born at all times of day. In the most unexpected places. Capture them before they’re lost:
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  • Order and carry a Moleskine Smart Notebook, to capture ideas when inspiration strikes.
  • Use the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app to photograph the concepts on paper and transform them to digital files.
  • Then, sync to Creative Cloud, and import them into Illustrator or Photoshop CC to refine them and bring them to life.

Creating without boundaries. It’s that easy.

12:10 PM Comments (8) Permalink

An Illustrator Goes Hollywood

The anticipation and excitement of attending his first Adobe MAX inspired the art; a band and a human rights movement inspired its title. Behind Orlando Arocena’s Brave Leon art.

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It’s a certainty that anyone who’s visited the Adobe Illustrator CC Facebook or who uses Illustrator CC is familiar with Orlando Arocena‘s vector art. But when we asked him to attend Adobe MAX as a MAX Insider (someone who would share personal insights about the conference), he remembered his mother’s advice about being a good guest: “Never show up empty-handed.”

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Coupled with a bit of restless energy and a traffic jam, her advice led to a “mental sketch” just one day before he was scheduled to be in Los Angeles. Sketching in his mind is the only type Orlando does; he explained his process during a recent lecture at Pratt Institute: “Although I do a significant amount of research regarding my mental sketches, over time I realized that I wanted to eliminate the stiff rigors of the standard process of sketch, scan, trace; so I rarely do any pre-sketching on paper. I’m a big fan of energy and confidence and running with them from start to finish, harnessing the excitement of starting a project.”

Pop culture meets Hollywood icon

Fueled by music, Orlando sat down at his computer and began to draw. Six hours later his art, part pop culture icon and part Hollywood homage, emerged…

In it was a connection to location (Hollywood), and the band (Kings of Leon) he learned would be playing at the Adobe MAX Bash: “I wanted my vector to be a pop-icon parody, leveraging established elements synonymous with Hollywood that, when composed, would also represent a Kings of Leon-at-Adobe MAX-in LA gig poster.”

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Keeping the subject matter rooted in Hollywood—by incorporating Art Deco embellishments and a color palette reminiscent of Hollywood’s Golden Age—he also kept it relevant to a modern audience (and specifically to Adobe’s creative audience), with tattoos. But not just ANY tattoos, but icons from Adobe’s tools palettes. “I decided to inject elements from the tools menus that, for me, represent customization and are found in practically every Adobe application: the Fill/Stroke, the Eye-Dropper and the Arrow (depicted as a piercing rather than a selection tool).”

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The essence of an illustration

During that initial drawing session, Orlando shared his progress on his Facebook. Despite the online support and encouragement of an audience hoping he was creating a vector Wizard of Oz tribute, he stopped just short of revealing the final illustration. Instead, he put the artwork aside, deciding to finish it up the next day, just hours before his flight.

After printing two artists proofs to “get a closer look at any errors or misalignment, and to make notes of questionable areas to address on the vector file,” he printed an 18 x 24 foil print (on his own giclée printer) and took off for the airport.

It wasn’t until after Lee Hirsch, the documentary filmmaker behind The Bully Project, took the stage and touched his heart that the circumstances surrounding this personal project and the fictional character in it, came together for Orlando. He realized, “What began as Kings of Leon-at-Adobe MAX-in LA gig poster was no longer just that; it had transformed into something more. The true spirit of the image was revealed and my vector had become the Cowardly Lion who had found courage at Adobe MAX—thanks to The Bully Project.”

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That’s the story of how Brave Leon came together for this gifted artist: An invitation, a band, a movement, and Illustrator CC.


Orlando_6_AiLogoAdobe Illustrator CC. Try it for 30 days. Free. On us. Make something.

10:05 AM Comments (0) Permalink

How The Gone Girl Post-production Team Helped Us Deliver Better Features in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

I’ve been the product manager for Adobe Premiere Pro CC for four years and have never been more excited to work with our product teams and customers than I am now.

Most of you know by now that Premiere Pro CC was used as the exlusive non-linear editing system (NLE) for David Fincher’s Gone Girl—the first Hollywood feature film shot in 6K. While you may already know how Premiere Pro CC helped the Gone Girl team work more efficiently, you likely don’t know how working with the Gone Girl post-production team helped us build a better product.

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At Adobe, we’re committed to making a product that reflects customer feedback and needs, and we love working closely with customers throughout product development cycles. We were offered the opportunity to work with editorial royalty—two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter, ACE, who we knew would push Premiere Pro CC to be an even better NLE. Considering he works with David Fincher, a director notoriously known for pushing technical limits while filmmaking, we felt that getting this right would mean a lot for our product and our users.

So what did we do? We parked our engineers in the same building—just doors away from Kirk, assistant editor Tyler Nelson, and post-production supervisor Peter Mavromates. The engineers lived-and-breathed the movie just like the production team (and I can’t even begin to tell you how proud I was when I saw their names in the credits), working very long days, helping with workflow questions, and fixing issues as they arose.

There were a lot of features that the Gone Girl team helped us create but the top three are Render & Replace, Multi-project Workflows, and Advanced Search in timeline (all of these were recently made public in the October 2014 release of Premiere Pro CC).

Because Gone Girl was super Adobe After Effects CC heavy—a good amount of the timeline was After Effects CC comps—Render & Replace was designed to help the team speed up performance by flattening completed After Effects CC compositions into video clips (in fact the feature was finished too late to be used on the movie, so they used preview renders, but we certainly built it alongside them). Thanks to Dynamic Link, intermediate rendering was eliminated between Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC. The original comps were always accessible if the assistant editor needed to make further changes to a comp, and he could do so while Kirk continued the edit. When the comp was done, it would show up in Kirk’s timeline.

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Multi-project Workflows allowed the Gone Girl team to work concurrently on different parts of the film in different project environments. Kirk Baxter was able to open multiple Media Browser panels for easy access to parts of the project that assistant editors were working on at the same time. The new Source Monitor Timeline—which allows users to open a second timeline for media and sequences from other projects, making it easy to bring existing clips, edits, comps and effects directly into the current project—was suggested by the Gone Girl team and although the feature wasn’t available during the editing of the film, it did make it into the October 2014 release.

We also added the ability to search bins so users can generate dynamic bins based on search criteria. This enabled us to include Advanced Timeline Search capabilities as well. Search bins are updated as new content is added, so users can keep projects organized, even as new footage is still coming in.

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We also added other features such as assignable marker colors and a variety of timeline improvements that helped the team work better and faster. As we built the features for and with the Gone Girl team, we learned more about their incredibly challenging workflow than we ever considered.

All that learning and all those long hours (Thanks guys!) have helped us to build a better product, and we’re so proud of what we achieved with the input from the Gone Girl editorial and post-production team. There were some tough times—we knew there would be—but thanks to the dedicated professionals on their editing team and our engineering team, the project was a huge success, and the first of many more exciting things to come.

Last month, we hosted a panel of the team that worked on Gone Girl. Check out the Behind the Scenes on Gone Girl, which begins with a quick overview of how the tools were used.

10:18 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Adobe Ideas: A New Name, A New Look, A New App

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Recently, Adobe Ideas, our popular vector drawing app for iPad and iPhone, that’s been downloaded over 2.2 million times since May 2013, grew up and got better. Adobe Illustrator Draw is a transformation that means a newer, more modern version of the full-featured drawing app that people have come to rely on.

 

Not just an update; a complete reinterpretation

Instead of settling for just another update, we’ve created an entirely new version of Adobe Ideas. Based on Adobe’s new Creative SDK, the redesigned version of Ideas (Adobe Draw) matches the look and the connection to creative assets and community found in Adobe Photoshop Sketch and Adobe Illustrator Line. But it’s not just creating consistency across our mobile apps that has us so excited, it’s also the new features… which include new, completely rewritten, robust file syncing, and the ability to effortlessly bring files into Adobe Illustrator CC.

Still free. And with the features designers and illustrators love

For everyone who loves Adobe Ideas, don’t worry: Not only have we kept the core drawing elements and everyone’s favorite controls and preferences, but the app is still free.

What we’ve added is Adobe Ink & Slide support, as well as a software version of Slide (called Touch Slide) for drawing straight-lines, geometric shapes and French curves—without hardware. (No longer will it be necessary to create workarounds for drawing perfect circles.) We’ve also added Behance integration, including the ability to post works in progress to Behance and receive in-app feedback; the ability to view a gallery of content inside the app; and effortless Creative Cloud back-up and file syncing.

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Sign-up, sign-in and sync

What can you do to get going with Adobe Draw? Take the time to create an Adobe ID, sign in with it, and sync your Adobe Ideas files to Creative Cloud… because our new drawing app is here. And now that it is, existing Ideas files that are synced to Creative Cloud will be automatically migrated to Adobe Draw. (Files synced to Creative Cloud can be grouped together in folders that will be imported as projects in Draw.)

Brian Yap talked about Adobe Illustrator Draw at Adobe MAX in a session titled What’s New in Adobe Ideas. Give it a watch. Then go get Adobe Draw for iPad in the iTunes App Store. Sync those Adobe Ideas files. Then keep an ongoing listen to Adobe Drawing’s Facebook and Twitter.

11:28 AM Permalink

Typekit: New Fonts from Hamilton Wood Type Foundry

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Good news for your desktop (and your websites): We’ve added a boatload of new typefaces from Hamilton Wood Type Foundry to the Typekit library.

Hamilton Wood Type (HWT) is a partnership between the P22 type foundry and the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum, bringing 19th-century wood type designs into modern font formats. We’ve long been supporters of this cause at Adobe Type, conducting fundraisers and making donations, and helping with the digitization effort. Three of the designs in the HWT collection were digitized by members of our team: Gothic Round by me, Tuscan Extended by Frank Greißhammer, and Bulletin Script by Paul Hunt.

The bulk of the HWT Collection is comprised of digital revivals, but it also includes two original designs made by Erik Spiekermann (HWT Artz) and Matthew Carter (HWT Van Lanen).

We included just a couple of HWT fonts in our library prior to this release, but now we’re all caught up: All of the font families of the current HWT collection are now available at Typekit, and you can use any of them on your desktop (and, in most cases, on the web) with a Portfolio plan or higher.

This initiative not only helps the dissemination of fonts that were previously only available as wood type, but it also helps the preservation of wood type history since a portion of proceeds from all sales of the HWT digital fonts goes toward supporting the mission and operation of the The Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum.

With over twenty fonts new to the Typekit library from HWT, we’d be here all day if we profiled each one. Here’s a handful to give you a sample (be sure to check out the full list.)

HWT American

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HWT American Chromatic was the first design in the collection to be digitized (the term chromatic means that it’s made up of fonts that act as layers, to which different colors can be applied—resulting in rich, attention-grabbing headlines. The family has a total of eight styles that can be arranged in multiple combinations for an almost endless number of variations. Try layering the styles on a web page using CSS, or create interesting hues in print by letting the colors overprint. The Behance gallery from Hamilton Wood Type goes into more detail about the work that went into digitizing this one-of-a-kind font family.

HWT Gothic Round

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It’s hard to believe the contemporary-looking HWT Gothic Round was originally designed almost two centuries ago, in 1838. The round edges of this Gothic (or sans-serif) face give the design an undeniable warmth and bubbly quality—particularly noticeable in the lowercase letters. The design’s heavy weight provides plenty of impact in applications that demand a reader’s heightened attention, such as a magazine masthead or a store sign. This typeface was a 2013 Typographica favorite; see more about the work that went into digitizing it.

HWT Unit Gothic

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First shown in a magazine advertisement in 1907, the HWT Unit Gothic series includes a breadth of weight and width styles rarely seen in wood type designs. Seamlessly organized as a system of fonts, this family is believed to have been the predecessor of the neo-grotesque collections—Helvetica and Univers—released around 50 years later. Besides supporting extended Latin, HWT Unit Gothic also includes Greek and Cyrillic, thus providing broad language coverage for a wide range of applications, from newspaper headlines to logos. Read more about the digitization process for this typeface on the Hamilton Wood Type Behance page.

HWT Van Lanen

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In 2002, the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum commissioned typeface designer Matthew Carter to develop a new wood type design as a way to help promote the newly established facility. Part of the project included the fabrication of actual wood blocks. Named after Jim Van Lanen, the museum’s founder, this bold wedge-shape serifed design of HWT Van Lanen is reminiscent of the Latin Extended style popularized in the late 19th century. Included in the family is a reversed font style, called Streamer, that can be used on its own or in combination with the default style to create interesting chromatic effects. See the Hamilton Wood Type Behance page for more details about the making of Van Lanen.

Let us know what you make with these new fonts; we love seeing cool type in action. And if you’ve never tried Typekit, sign up for a free trial and take a look around… then upgrade to a paid plan when you’re ready.

Reposted from the Typekit blog.

12:59 PM Permalink

Premiere Clip Gives New Life to Personal Videos

Among all the new mobile apps and desktop product updates released on October 6, Adobe Premiere Clip stands out for me as a fun app that can be used to make something out of all the videos and photos you’ve already got on your iPhone or iPad—or both, actually, by syncing your project across devices and tapping into each device’s camera roll.

My editorial focus on the Creative Cloud Learn team is our digital video and audio tools. Until recently, I hadn’t seen any good mobile apps for making creative use of the videos and photos on my phone. There’s something compelling about making a movie soon after having shot some video at a family event or while traveling, and then sharing that edited movie with others or posting it to YouTube. Premiere Clip makes that task fun.

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Before Premiere Clip was launched at Adobe MAX 2014, I had recorded a couple of tutorials: Create and edit video with Premiere Clip and Refine a Premiere Clip video in Premiere Pro. For those demos, I went downtown (in San Francisco) and shot some relatively random videos of cable cars, which I then assembled into a movie using my iPhone and iPad. It was fun but somewhat familiar terrain for me. However, I recently used Premiere Clip “in the wild.”

While attending MAX, I went to a large outdoor party where there was lots of food, playfully interactive outlets for spontaneous creativity, and a concert by Kings of Leon. It occurred to me that I should record the event—and put Premiere Clip to the test.

I shot the following movie entirely with my iPhone 5 and edited it in Premiere Clip while flying back from Los Angeles. Before considering it ready for public consumption, I synced the project with my Creative Cloud profile and then imported it into Adobe Premiere Pro CC, where I did some minor trimming and audio adjusting.

Playing around with Premiere Clip is a lot of fun—and perhaps gives some meaning to all those times you hold up your phone and shoot something that seems important at the time but, you realize later, it’s too difficult to do anything with it.

Let me know in the tutorials’ feedback links what you think of Premiere Clip, and how you think it could help you with either personal, or professional, video projects.

11:52 AM Permalink

From Adobe Ideas to Adobe Illustrator Draw: Making The Switch

For quite some time, designer/illustrator Brian Yap has integrated mobile art applications into his professional creative workflow… His mobile app of choice? Adobe Ideas. He’s used the full-featured vector app to capture illustrative concepts, develop them, and later move them to Adobe Illustrator CC for fine-tuning. It’s led to a successful creative process and an identifiable Ideas-to-Illustrator illustration style.

Like many Adobe Ideas users, Brian recently made the switch to Adobe Illustrator Draw. After Brian’s Adobe MAX sessions (What’s New in Adobe Ideas and Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps), we asked him to share some of his initial thoughts about making the move. Here’s what he had to say:

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

Adobe Ideas was the most powerful vector drawing tool for the iPad, and it changed the way I thought about the device as a professional tool. Adobe Illustrator Draw is a continuing evolution of Ideas, and proves that the development team is listening and reacting to the community in way unheard of when it comes to graphics applications. Use it. Love it. Become part of its future development.

Of course I always have the immediate reaction, “Why does this thing I love need to change?” But it didn’t take long to fall in love again; besides some amazing enhancements to the drawing engine that I’ve grown to love, the UI has been totally designed with a lot of user feedback taken into account.

Overall, pretty much every time I panicked a bit because a feature I depended on seemed to be taken out, I not only found it a few seconds later, but quickly realized the thinking that went into the redesign. A few thoughts:

While the tools are generally the same, the icons are way more descriptive of what the tools actually do (something I always wondered about with Ideas). As an example, I always thought it was a bit confusing to have a pencil icon for a tool that didn’t have a pencil texture.

There were some cuts made to the tools but with a little trial it’s easy to see why: The “long press” while using a tool was always the same as the paint bucket so the paint bucket tool itself was somewhat unnecessary. Although I was always in the camp of the “long press” I imagine people who relied heavily on the paint bucket will find that change a bit tricky at first.

I like that the Gallery interface is in line with the other new apps that take more advantage of the connection to Behance and the Creative Cloud.

By far the biggest change is in the layers options; Draw is much more focused on the options for each layer. In Ideas, I was constantly merging layers I didn’t mean to merge. Now that the options are reached through touching the layer options icon on each layer, it’s always clear which layer is being affected. One tip: The merge down button is now under the icon that covers flipping the layer.

Finally, based on what I’ve heard, there is some concern about the lack of PDF export… I’ve been told that the option will be added back in a future update.

 

We’ve asked Brian to keep us updated about his Draw discoveries, so stay tuned to Adobe Drawing on Twitter and Facebook. And for a few tips about syncing Adobe Ideas files to Creative Cloud, Adobe Ideas: A Transformation is a quick read.

10:22 AM Permalink

Introducing Adobe Premiere Clip

Ever felt intimidated by the prospect of putting together a video project? With Premiere Clip, Adobe wants to make video accessible to all creative professionals.

Adobe Premiere Clip is our brand new (and free!) app that lets you, in a few quick steps, turn clips and images from your iPhone or iPad into polished videos, and then share them with friends, family, clients, and the world at large. It’s a powerful tool for creative pros; and for established video pros, the app makes it easy to create edits on-the-go and draft a project for further refining in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Watch the Premiere Clip demo from the mobile apps keynote at Adobe MAX:
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With its simple editing workflow, it’s easy to work with assets  already on your device or those you have stored on Adobe Creative Cloud. You can also shoot new video from within Premiere Clip: Just grab clips and still images, drop them into the order you like, trim out the bits you don’t want. Set the mood by using one of the included music themes or by adding your own audio file.  Add cinema-quality color treatments to your video with a single tap. Adjust lighting or add slow motion effects and other finishing touches like fades or transitions.

Dave Werner’s Made With Clip video of Adobe MAX:

You can even work on your project across devices (starting on your your iPhone and then switching to your iPad, for example) thanks to automatic syncing of projects and media through your Creative Cloud Creative Profile.

Once you’ve completed a video, share it with your audience through social media, your website, or any number of other platforms.

Want to take a project further? Sending it to Premiere Pro CC is easy too. Through the app’s Edit in Premiere Pro sharing feature, send everything in your project as a group of files to the Creative Cloud Assets folder on your desktop. Once the files have been synced to your desktop, simply open the XML file with Adobe Premiere Pro, and open the sequence with the project name.

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Still not sure where to begin? Try one of our Reviewer’s Guides to help you get started. These guides breakdown some of the conventions of different types of videos and can kickstart your pre-production with pointers on creating a narrative and suggestions for shot composition. All you need to do is fill in your content.

What will you create with Premiere Clip? We can’t wait to see!  Include #MadeWithClip when sharing on social media. Check out the Community Videos page in the app for inspiration and publish your projects as “Public” for a chance to be featured. And, make sure to follow the Premiere Clip Twitter feed and blog for news, highlights, tips, and tricks.

Premiere Clip is available now in the iTunes App Store for most iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch devices with iOS 7 or later, including iPad 2 or later (mini and retina), iPhones 4S and later, and iPod Touch 5th generation and later. (Unsure of your device model? Check the model number on the back and consult Apple’s guide for iPads, iPhones, and iPods.)


Learn more about Premiere Clip
Download Premiere Clip from the App Store
Follow Premiere Clip on Twitter
Watch Meagan Keane’s demo and see what all the buzz is about

11:15 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud for Desktop: The Smart Tool for New Creatives

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Bring the goodness of Creative Cloud right to your desktop.

Creative Cloud for desktop is a lightweight, configurable app that lets you manage Creative Cloud apps, sync assets, receive notifications, and connect to powerful Cloud functionality and services—all from the comfort of your desktop.

Creative Cloud for desktop enables your Creative Profile. An effective way of managing your creative assets across apps and devices, Creative Profile connects you to everything you need for your creative work—files, pictures, colors, brushes, shapes, fonts, text styles, graphics, and any other creative assets you care about—and puts it all at your fingertips, by simply signing into Creative Cloud for desktop.

Let’s take a closer look at the feature-rich technologies and powerful Cloud services that Creative Cloud for desktop offers:

Apps

Creative Cloud for desktop makes it easy to discover, download, and install the newest Creative Cloud desktop apps to your computer. In addition to the latest versions, you can also find previous versions of apps, and receive notifications about updates as soon as they’re available.

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Creative Cloud for desktop is also now a one-stop shop to launch apps, manage updates, and even uninstall older apps that you no longer need.

Assets, libraries, and more

Creative Cloud comes with online storage that lets you access your work from anywhere and share your work with others in any location. Creative Cloud for desktop connects your Creative Cloud online storage to your computer, keeping all your files in sync, across all your computers.

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With Creative Cloud for desktop, you’ll never run into a “missing font” scenario. Use the Creative Cloud for desktop app to sync fonts from Typekit on your desktop; synced fonts continue to be available on your computer, as long as the Creative Cloud for desktop app is running. Use the synced fonts in your favorite Adobe apps, as well as any other apps installed on your computer.

Your creativity can reach greater heights with Creative Cloud Market, a collection of high-quality assets, created and curated by professionals like you. You can build on these assets, modify them, and use them without worrying about attribution, licensing, usage tracking, or royalty payments. Simply use the Creative Cloud for desktop app to browse through the assets, add to a Library, and download the assets to your computer.

During the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote, we announced availability of Creative Cloud Libraries which provide seamless access to your creative assets across Creative Cloud’s desktop tools and all-new connected mobile apps. Creative Cloud for desktop helps to keep your Creative Cloud Libraries in sync, so that any brushes, shapes, colors, graphics, or assets you save to a Library, are instantly available on your desktop from within Adobe Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC.

Community

How can a creative experience be complete without a community? Use the Creative Cloud for desktop app to dig in to the vast collective of creative talent on Behance. Remain inspired and keep ahead of the curve by following other creative people. You can browse through projects, share and seek feedback about your work, and take a closer look at a project that piques your interest all from within the Creative Cloud for desktop app.

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Get started with Creative Cloud for desktop

Creative Cloud for desktop is your interface to Creative Cloud on the desktop!

Always stay up to date with what’s happening in your creative world by using notifications in Creative Cloud for desktop. If you don’t have it running already, download Creative Cloud for desktop now and get the most out of your Creative Cloud experience.

While Creative Cloud for desktop works behind the scenes to bring your Creative Cloud Profile to your computer, you can also use it actively to access Creative Cloud products and services. To learn more about what you can do with Creative Cloud for desktop, read through these resources:

10:31 AM Permalink

New Features, and A Mobile App, for Creative Cloud’s Pro Video Tools

Updated desktop features, born from a collaboration with David Fincher’s Gone Girl team, and Adobe Premiere Clip, a new mobile app.

On Monday, at Adobe MAX 2014, the world’s leading creativity conference, Adobe announced the availability of new and updated free mobile apps, like the all-new Adobe Premiere Clip for iOS, and 2014.1 updates to Creative Cloud applications, including all of the video tools:

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC
Adobe After Effects CC
Adobe SpeedGrade CC
Adobe Prelude CC
Adobe Audition CC
Adobe Media Encoder CC
Adobe Story CC Plus
Adobe Anywhere

Adobe previewed the new video features at IBC 2014 last month. Key themes for the updates include: new project and media management capabilities, such as Search bins and Destination Publishing; support for cutting-edge technologies, like HiDPI Windows 8.1 displays and devices and read/write support for the GoPro CineForm intermediate codec; and more streamlined workflows, including Curves adjustments and a refined new Look workflow in SpeedGrade CC.

Introducing Adobe Premiere Clip

The MAX announcements also included the release of Adobe Premiere Clip, a brand new iOS app that makes it easy to turn footage on an iPhone or iPad into great-looking videos. The app allows users to edit and enhance video with professional looks, effects, and audio. Premiere Clip uses Creative Cloud to automatically sync projects between devices, so that users can shoot whenever they have an opportunity—and edit later when they have time. Users can also move Clip projects into Premiere Pro CC via their Creative Profile, which provides access to their rich desktop toolset.

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“With Premiere Clip we’re making editing a function that is always in your hands. Our goal is to bring the tools to the media,” explained Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “This allows people to ‘just do it’ and start making their own beautiful videos, completely on device, or to use it as a kind of sketchbook for video pros who want to rough out ideas to bring into Premiere Pro.”

Adobe Premiere Clip for iPhone and iPad is available as a free download in the iTunes App Store.

The Influence of Gone Girl

Coinciding with the recent theatrical release of Gone Girl—directed by David Fincher and edited on Premiere Pro CC by Kirk Baxter, ACE—the new updates include a number of features developed in collaboration with Team Fincher. These include larger features, like Multi-project workflows and Advanced Timeline search, workflow enhancements like EDL improvements and Render & Replace, and important details of the UI and workspace refinements, such as ripple label colors and definable marker colors, the way in- and out ranges are displayed.

In Gone Girl Rosamund Pike portrays Amy Dunne, whose mysterious disappearance turns her husband into a possible murder suspect.

“I believe this was the first major Hollywood film shot at 6K so the scope of the project was huge.” said Al Mooney, senior product manager. “We were working with an artistically-driven and incredibly technical team at the top of their game. It was an inspiring experience for us and we’re immensely proud to have been part of it.”

Fully 80 percent of Gone Girl ended up as some form of After Effects CC composition on the final Premiere Pro Timeline for the project. This gave rise to the request for the Render & Replace feature from Team Fincher. Render & Replace ensures fast playback of projects with lots of visual effects by substituting comps with rendered clips—without losing Dynamic Link integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects. “It’s exciting for us to be releasing features for all of our users that have evolved out of a collaboration with one of the best filmmakers in the business,” added Mooney.

 

Along with a significant update to Premiere Pro CC, all of the video tools received enhancements and new features with the 2014.1 release. For more information watch this overview video by Al Mooney.

To learn more about Adobe’s collaboration with David Fincher and his team on Gone Girl, read Gone Girl Marks Yet Another Milestone for Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Learn more about Adobe Premiere Clip and the rest of Adobe’s new and updated mobile apps.

Watch the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote and learn more about all of the great new fall releases.

Pricing and availability

Today’s updates to Creative Cloud are available to Creative Cloud members as part of their membership at no additional cost. To join Creative Cloud, special promotional pricing is available to customers who own Adobe Creative Suite 3 or later and membership plans are available for individuals, students, photographers, teams, educational institutions, government agencies and enterprises.

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