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Swiss Radio and Television Produces Stunning Sochi Opener

Broadcaster uses Adobe Creative Cloud workflow to create opener promoting the winter games

The Winter Games are a chance for us to witness magic moments of incredible artistry and athleticism performed by the amazing athletes competing there. But in order for us to do so, broadcasters around the world spent months preparing for that short period of intense coverage. For Swiss Radio and Television (SRF), a publicly funded broadcaster serving the German-speaking part of Switzerland, the preparations included creating a stunning opener that builds excitement for audiences tuning-in to the games. Patrick Arnecke, head of design and promotion, leads the creative team responsible for design and production of the on air campaign.

Adobe: Tell us about the Swiss Radio and Television.

Arnecke: The SRF is a publicly funded broadcaster that serves the German-speaking part of Switzerland. We maintain two full-blown 24/7 TV channels, a TV repeat channel for news programs, seven radio channels, and an extensive online portal.

Adobe: What teams do you work with at the SRF and what do they produce?

Arnecke: I’m the head of the design and promotion team. The design team consists of 25 designers who do all corporate design, motion graphics and interaction design for SRF. Creatively they are responsible for channel branding, campaigns, image clips and labels as well as show packaging. We also do all of the 2D and 3D animation used for our TV magazines and news shows. The promotion team has eleven editors and promo producers who work on traditional on-air trailers as well as cross media campaigns.

Adobe: Tell us about the work you’ve done for the Winter Games?

Arnecke: Last year during the summer we started to rethink our overall sports design. We have various sports programs on air and wanted to repackage the whole set of shows for SRF zwei, our main entertainment and sports channel. We regularly cover huge events like the Winter Games for the Swiss audience, and we needed to come up with a solution for those events as well, and tie that into the overall design.

We decided to center our redesign around the core idea of the “magic moment”—those rare moments when extraordinary athletic performance seems almost supernatural. We then spent five days shooting all the necessary plates using RED Epic and Phantom Flex cameras, special camera rigs with a high speed camera carousel, and a huge 15m x 9m x 7.5m green screen area. Among other things, we staged ice hockey, alpine skiing, figure skating, snowboarding, ski jumping, and cross country skiing. Everything was conceptualized, directed, and pre- and post-produced by four in-house designers. From that footage we produced a 28-second opener for our Sochi coverage along with the show packaging, and the promo teasers that we used to ramp up the campaign in January.

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Adobe: What products are you using to produce your content?

Arnecke: Right now we have a mix of Adobe Creative Cloud and Creative Suite 6 software. On the design team we use Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Our main tool for 2D animation is After Effects, and we rely on Cinema 4D as our main 3D package. The closer relationship between Adobe and Maxon and the strong connection between Cinema 4D and After Effects comes in very handy for our pipeline.

At the beginning of 2013 we started using Edge Animate to create small, interactive HTML5 elements to give our online news articles more depth and interactivity. For our video content, we started to work with SpeedGrade to give content from different sources a uniform look. During the last months we switched to Premiere Pro as our main editing tool, which replaces Final Cut Pro.

Adobe: What was the workflow for creating the Sochi opener?

Arnecke: In pre-production the responsible designers Martin Bernhard (director) and Simon Renfer (co-director) used Photoshop, with Wacom tablets and screens, to create the storyboards. On set and after the shoot was completed, we used SpeedGrade to convert the Phantom material and then edited the content in Premiere Pro. Lead 3D Artists Jürg Dummermuth and Simone Nucci did all of the 3D CGI with Cinema 4D. In addition to using After Effects for previsualization and animatics, it was also used for 2D animation, keying, rotoscoping, retouching, compositing, and grading. We’ve done a lot of smaller projects such as show openers and image trailers using Premiere Pro, but the Sochi opener is one of the biggest projects we’ve done to date with the new workflow.

Adobe: Why did you make the switch to Premiere Pro?

Arnecke: After Apple didn’t continue Final Cut Pro, we were looking for alternatives. The pipeline efficiencies that let us easily switch between Premiere Pro and After Effects are important to us. Premiere Pro is especially useful if we shoot on RED cameras because thanks to the Mercury Playback Engine we don’t have to convert and we can edit right away. We usually like to edit on set to see if what we’ve shot is exactly what we need.

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Adobe: Tell us how you’re using Adobe Edge Animate CC?

Arnecke: We have a small team of designers who work on infographics for our daily news shows. We use graphical content created for on-air programming, add interactivity and repackage that content for our news articles online. For example, for the election of Pope Franziskus or the 50th anniversary of the President Kennedy assassination we created interactive explanatory pieces with Edge Animate. These interactives give more depth to our news articles online and typically take us one to three days to produce—last year we did more than 150 of these.

See examples of the infographics here

Adobe: What’s next for your team?

Arnecke: We’re planning a seven day shoot that will take place in March for our summer sports. With the success of the winter sports workflow, we’ll be using a similar setup.

Read more about the use of Maxon Cinema 4D

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud

12:52 PM Permalink

New MacBook Pro Retina Display Support

Adobe’s product teams are keenly aware of a creative professional’s desire to experience the highest quality creation experience. That is why I am delighted to announce our plans to optimize a selection of our products to display your content and creations on HiDPI displays, including the Retina Display available on the new MacBook Pro. Over the next few months, key Adobe products will deliver HiDPI display support to all customers on current releases.

HiDPI displays allow for a dramatic improvement in image fidelity and resolution. Naturally, designers, photographers and creative professionals want to take full advantage of this new technology. Software that is not native to HiDPI display uses interpolation to duplicate pixels to fill the screen, meaning text is not as sharp and images don’t have as much detail. The increased resolution of these displays requires that each product update the interface of the application and ensure that the content or the creation itself is displayed accurately with the appropriate level of fidelity. As an example, to enable HiDPI display support in Photoshop requires the replacement of 2500 icons and cursors and other engineering work which will be complete and ready for customers this Fall. This resolution shift in the new display technology presents unique challenges to teams that support bitmap, vector or video content. Therefore each product team will be releasing support for HiDPI display for Apple’s Retina Display as soon as the development is complete and tested for each individual product.

We expect to update the following products with HiDPI support, free to all CS6 and Creative Cloud customers, over the next few months:

Dreamweaver

Edge Animate

Illustrator

Lightroom

Photoshop

Photoshop Touch

Prelude

Adobe Premiere Pro

SpeedGrade

We are currently evaluating the roadmap for when other products may support HiDPI displays, and we will announce those plans as they are finalized.

At Adobe we work hard to support the latest innovations. We will continue to release security patches, bug fixes and support new hardware changes, like HiDPI display support, to all of our customers outside of our regular development cycles just as we have always done.  Additionally, with Creative Cloud we now have the opportunity to release new features as they are ready, outside of major release cycles. On August 28, Illustrator released several features exclusively to Creative Cloud members. I am excited to announce that beginning this Fall, even more our flagship products, including Photoshop, will begin to release features exclusively to Creative Cloud members. Creative Cloud members will be able to enjoy the latest product enhancements as they are ready without having to wait for major product releases.

This is an exciting time. Stay tuned over the next few months for more exciting developments to come.

10:44 AM Permalink

Adobe Edge Animate, Preview 7 and Muse Updates Now Available in Creative Cloud

For our Adobe Muse and Adobe Edge users, we have some exciting updates to share – and if you’re a Creative Cloud member, consider it good news times two with the applications available to all Cloud users!
edgeAdobe Edge Animate, Preview 7 

First up, Adobe Edge – a next generation tool for creating content with motion and interactivity for the web, using web standards like HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript – is now Adobe Edge Animate with the release of Preview 7. We’re thrilled to announce that the latest preview of Adobe Edge is now available in the Creative Cloud.

Edge Animate Preview 7 is a major update, with significant new features like resizable layouts, which can adapt to different screen sizes, rulers and guides, shadow effects, timeline and keyframe improvements, enhanced text features, and much more. Watch Preview 7 in action below, and for more about this release and for a complete list of features, visit the Adobe Edge Blog.

You can also check out Edge Animate in action over at the Edge Showcase.

 

Muse

Adobe Muse Updates 

Today, Adobe Muse announces new features and updates available to Adobe Muse subscribers and Creative Cloud members, including availability in Japanese, and new built-in support for contact forms.

Find out how to easily add, configure, and style contact forms into website designs without having to embed HTML code from third-party online form providers in the video below.

This is just the beginning of a longer-term effort to bring more extensive content management capabilities to Adobe Muse users through tighter integration with the Adobe hosting solution, Adobe Business Catalyst. Get the complete list of other great Adobe Muse features and enhancements, including the ability to add HTML5 animations created with Adobe Edge Animate here and in this post, What’s New in Adobe Muse 2.0, by Evangelist Terry White.

9:13 AM Permalink