Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe Gaming SDK Updated

We are pleased to announce the availability of Adobe Gaming SDK version 1.2, part of the Adobe Creative Cloud. This latest update to the Adobe Gaming SDK enhances this essential collection of frameworks, code samples, and learning resources that work together to help game developers create and deliver ActionScript games across multiple Devices.

Some of the latest editions to version 1.2 include:

  • Away Builder Workflow Tool – Streamline and simplify the creation of 3D scenes with this open source visual workflow tool created for both designers and developers. Away Builder is a companion application for the Away3D framework. Import and stage 3D assets like models, materials, effects, and more.
  • Game controller input APIs – In addition to the OUYA game controller support, we’ve added Flash Player and AIR Gamepad support for desktop and XBOX 360 controller library for ActionScript developers.

Learn more about these new features as well as ActionScript concurrency (workers), LZMA SWF support, 4096×4096 and rectangle texture support plus more in the Flash Player 11.8 and AIR 3.8 release notes.

Download the Adobe Gaming SDK

10:43 AM Permalink

Open Source Flash C++ Compiler, CrossBridge

We are excited to announce that the Flash C++ Compiler (FlasCC) has been contributed to open source as CrossBridge and will be delivered through GitHub.  FlasCC has become the standard technology to bring C/C++ content to the unparalleled reach of the web.  As CrossBridge, it will enjoy the speed of innovation and improvement that the open source community can bring.

FlasCC was previously delivered as part of the Adobe Creative Cloud.  As CrossBridge, it is available to everyone and we invite you to join with us to improve it.  Adobe will continue to invest in CrossBridge, contributing to and managing the project.  CrossBridge has been released as 1.0.1, containing all the original source of FlasCC 1.0 plus several improvements to the product.  In addition, we have contributed all current, on-going development work of CrossBridge 1.1, which includes an upgrade to LLVM and the front end, Clang to enable advanced C++ syntax support.  We look forward to collaborating with the community to complete this exciting release.

To get started with CrossBridge, please visit adobe-flash.github.io/crossbridge and, to find out more about our Game Developer Tools and the Adobe Creative Cloud, visit gaming.adobe.com/getstarted.

11:54 AM Permalink

The Magic Bullet of Web Gaming

There are plenty of reasons to come to MAX, and at the top of the list are the outstanding sessions led by the most innovative minds in the industry. This year at Adobe MAX, don’t miss legend Richard Hilleman, Chief Creative Director at Electronic Arts and his session  The Magic Bullet of Web Gaming where he talks about the importance of controller design for game play learning curves and how it affects a audience size of a game.  He’ll also explore the links between positive reinforcement in a game and a games audience size with emerging innovations in various platform technologies. See our latest Q&A with Richard here.

Join Adobe evangelist Andy Hall and Enrique Duvos as they talk about how game developers and publishers around the world push the limits of what’s possible on the web and on mobile devices with Adobe Game Developer Tools during their session “Best of the Best:  International Flash Games Showcase

Learn more about the game developer session

Register Now: https://www.adobe-max.com/portal/newreg.ww?trackingid=KDCBO

10:59 AM Permalink

Girl Gamers are on the Rise! All Female Team of Developers from Arizona State University Follow their Dreams and Create Maia

Under guidance from Graphic Information Technology (GIT) professor Arnaud Ehgner, a team of female students from Arizona State University (ASU) has been working tirelessly on a school project to develop a one-level game on par with those created by industry professionals.

Maia, a 2D side-scroll action game for portable devices, is a magical jungle adventure that leads the player through a series of mysterious temples and ruins where the priestess—Maia—tries to head off an attack and keep peace in the village of Kuma.

The game is developed using 3D models for a 2D game. While the scenery is 2D, the characters are created first in 3D, and then transplanted into a 2D world. The team chose to develop the game using Adobe solutions including Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Flash Professional because of the compatibility across platforms. Illustrator is used for the game’s concept art; Photoshop to finalize artwork with shading, touch-ups, and closing up texture seams; and Flash Professional for creating an engaging game with consistency across platforms.

“Adobe Photoshop also helps us play with the different perspectives by easily letting us translate and rotate the 3D models onto a 2D plane,” said team leader Rachel Ramsey.

The game targets female players with a strong leading female character. “I am so excited to be a part of Maia, as it has been one of my childhood dreams to create a video game with a strong female protagonist,” notes team member Jennifer Davidson.

Maia, now being expanded to three levels, will officially launch at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2014 for the Independent Gaming Competition and be available as a free demo for a limited time on iOS and Android tablet and mobile devices.

ASU

Comprised of six women, team ‘Femme Fatale’ as shown in photo left to right: Liza Gutierrez, Jennifer Davidson, Samantha Hannis, Marcella Martinez, Skylar Mowery (Rachel Ramsey not pictured.) Photo by GIT major, Tessa Menken

Find out more information: Maia on FacebookMaia on TwitterMaia on Tumblr

10:21 AM Permalink

Game On: The Present and Future of Game Development

The Adobe Gaming crew has been out and about a lot lately, participating in large, multisite events that inspire youth and young adults to explore game development for fun and even as a potential profession.

First, we participated in the Global Game Jam, Jan. 25–27. More than 11,000 developers from 319 sites in 63 countries spent 48 adrenaline-fueled hours working on more than 3,100 projects based on this year’s theme, sound of a heartbeat. It was an exciting intellectual and creative marathon for programming, iterative design, narrative exploration, and artistic expression.

On Feb. 6, Adobe visited schools around the United States to promote digital literacy as part of Digital Learning Day. Nearly 25, 000 teachers and millions of students participated in all 50 states. The national campaign spotlights successful instructional technology practices in K–12 public schools.

In the Global Game Jam (GGJ), participants gathered late Friday afternoon, watched a short video keynote with advice from leading game developers, and then received the contest’s secret “sound of a heartbeat” theme. All sites worldwide were then challenged to make games based on that theme, with games to be completed by Sunday afternoon. Although the event is heavily focused on programming, there are many other areas where people who don’t code contributed to game development.

Many of our Adobe colleagues attended the event at locations worldwide. For instance, Adobe evangelist Andy Hall, in Sydney, Australia, went to cheer on jammers programming with Adobe Flash. “Organizers loved it and were happy to let us speak, hang around and interview people, or do whatever we wanted really,” Hall says. “With that said, at the Sydney Jam, my presence as an evangelist was not really necessary. Everyone there knew their technology backwards and forwards.”

Sushi

For the GGJ, Adobe sponsored an award for the best game made with Adobe Flash, which went to Monster Sushi Train. It features a monster sushi chef who cuts hearts into shapes requested by other monsters at a sushi bar. Its programmers are Chris Suffern, Wayne Petzler, and David Kofoed Wind. Check it out at http://www.playgamespro.com/game/1844/Sushi-Monster-Train.html.

For the K-12-focused Digital Learning Day, Adobe Gaming used the opportunity to connect with students—many of whom had limited previous computer experience—tackle the task of building a game with Adobe Flash Professional. Besides introducing them to Adobe Flash Professional, Adobe helped kids from different backgrounds collaborate in ways that made the best use of each student’s unique skills and interests, whether those interests included zombies or American history.

Achieving digital literacy through game design is also one of the goals of Globaloria, an Adobe education partner. Globaloria is a turnkey academic curriculum that uses a social learning network and game design to promote computing knowledge and global citizenship. As part of Digital Literacy Day, the Adobe Foundation has committed to match all donations made to Globaloria up to $50,000. You can be a part of it by donating at http://www.globaloria.org/adobe. Besides funding Globaloria’s initiatives, your donations help fund the World Wide Workshop, Globaloria’s parent organization. The World Wide Workshop supports publicly shared, long-term projects that are complex, computational, immersive, and innovative, so children build long-term skills for learning and critical thinking.

10:15 AM Permalink

Adobe Gaming Powers International Racing Squirrels

This week we wanted to highlight independent studio Playniac in our ongoing series of Adobe Gaming customer snapshots.

IRSAdobe Game Developer Tools allowed the company to create and deploy International Racing Squirrels across multiple platforms and devices from one code base. Players manage a team of unruly squirrels racing on tracks around the world and with 25 levels of fun and an iOS version of the game, it is sure to keep you busy for a while. Squirrels has received several awards including, finalist status in IndieCade 2012, finalist in 2012 Develop Indie Showcase, 4.5/5 stars by Indie Game Reviewer and was featured in Kongregate’s Hot New Games in 2012

Learn how they produced their wild, colorful new title in our most recent post case study here. If you’re looking to build your own great games with Adobe Gaming technologies, check out our Gaming site for more information.

9:27 AM Permalink

2013: Full Speed Ahead for Adobe Gaming!

As we move into 2013, we’re excited to make investments that support the incredible, ongoing momentum in social and mobile gaming that Adobe has championed for more than a year. Flash technologies underpinned the success of many game developers from Fresh Planet to Zynga, both in the browser and on mobile, and you can see how Adobe Gaming technologies deliver the reach needed to improve game monetization in the graphic below.

numbers-inside-social-casual-gaming

In December, the Adobe Gaming team launched the first ever, packaged Adobe Game Developer Tools via the Creative Cloud. Within 2 weeks of their availability, we had over 20,000 downloads of the tools and more than 12,000 views of the Adobe Scout video! Today, we’re making it even easier for game developers by removing a key barrier to delivering games targeting Flash Player – from this point forward, the XC APIs are no longer classified as a Premium Feature for Flash Player, which means developers can use them royalty-free without a separate license from Adobe. Developers and publishers that have published content using the XC APIs do not need to make any changes to their content to reflect this change in status for the XC APIs, and we expect this adjustment to make it even easier for developers to use Flash and AIR as their cross-device game development workflow of choice. To find out more, check out the updated FAQ here.

In addition, we’re also announcing added funding for the Away Foundation, a non-profit Community Interest Company based in the UK, focusing on building and maintaining free and open source software resources for online and mobile games and applications. This funding will support the development and release of Away3D 4.1 and an exciting new open source project for Away Builder. Away Builder 1.0 is the first open source tool project for the foundation, and will provide a visual tool for designers that exposes and edits custom Away3D settings and object properties on 3D assets without the need for coding. And just last week, we updated the Gaming SDK, which includes the latest Away3D, Starling and Feathers frameworks as well as updates for the latest runtime releases. Working with Away has already produced several exciting advances for game developers using Adobe technologies and will continue to forward the delivery of rich games targeting mobile and the browser for years to come. Starforce Delta is a great example of a beautiful 3D RPG built with Away3D and now available on the web in open beta and coming soon as a mobile app. And if a touch of the 19th century is more your thing, check out Jane Austen Regency Dressup, as well as other games using the Away3D framework on the Away3D showcase.

IGFWe also wanted to highlight a handful of great games that really reflect the breadth of creativity using Adobe Gaming technologies and show off the skills and passion of the developers who made them. Four games using Adobe Gaming technologies were recently announced as Independent Game Festival (IGF) finalists! Incredipede, a beautifully illustrated browser-based game; Dys4ia, an autobiographical game about undergoing hormone replacement therapy as a trans woman; Intrusion 2, a sci-fi action platform game; and Super Hexagon, a fast-paced reflex game where you’ve gotta be great to survive 20 seconds.

And just in case you didn’t get your fill of zombies in 2012, check out GREE’s Zombie Jombie in the iOS App Store. GREE used PhoneGap Build – another Adobe Gaming technology – for this wildly addictive RPG card game that will surely have you selling for brains. It’s shaping up to be a wide open year ahead for Adobe Gaming, and we’re looking forward to conquering new worlds with you!

2:26 PM Permalink

Amazon Adds Free Adobe AIR Native Extensions for Game Developers

a_com_W_logo_RGBFor game developers who want to reach more customers, the Amazon Appstore for Android is a great marketplace to deliver games for Kindle Fire and Android devices. Today, Amazon announced the launch of free Adobe AIR Native Extensions (ANEs) for In-App Purchasing and GameCircle integration for the Amazon Kindle Fire, making it even faster and easier for Adobe Gaming developers to add these features into their mobile apps. With Amazon’s announcement yesterday that it’s extending IAP to cover games for Mac, PC, and Web platforms, ActionScript developers now have even more options to reach customers.

Each week, millions of customers play GameCircle-enabled games, comparing scores and competing against friends. We’ve seen a lot of popular Flash and AIR games in the Amazon Appstore, driving increased revenue for Adobe gaming developers. SongPop from Fresh Planet, Bingo Blitz from Buffalo Studios, Machinarium from Amanita and Stick Tennis from Stick Sports are just a few examples of great games in the Appstore built with Adobe Gaming Technology. The addition of AIR Native Extensions makes it simple for developers using Adobe AIR to quickly integrate GameCircle and IAP support into their creations.

As we announced in December, the Adobe Game Developer Tools – available via the Adobe Creative Cloud – give game developers and publishers access to a powerful set of resources in one central location. Designed to streamline the game development process from creation to deployment, the Game Developer Tools help game publishers and developers reach the broadest possible audience worldwide – over 1.3 billion connected Windows and Mac PCs and over 500 million smartphones and tablets – 20 times the reach of the bestselling Xbox 360 gaming console. The new ANEs from Amazon complement this offering, and continuing to expand the audience reach for new games.

The Adobe Game Developer Tools include Adobe Scout, an advanced profiling tool that helps developers unlock significant performance optimization, and the Adobe AIR SDK, which enables developers to package ActionScript code into native apps for Kindle Fire along with other devices. Developers can find out more and sign up for a free membership at http://gaming.adobe.com.

Developers can access the free Adobe ANEs and read the blog from Amazon here.

We’re looking forward to seeing new games take advantage of these exciting new ANEs, and how game developers blaze new trails on Amazon!

10:06 AM Permalink

Video Recap: Adobe Game Developer Tools Launch Event

More than 200 developers packed Town Hall in the Adobe San Francisco office on Monday night for our Game Developer Tools launch event. Fun and excitement poured from every part of the room with remote-controlled Angry Birds, vintage arcade games and new iPad AIR apps. It was a great time with great partners – Zynga, Rumble, KIXEYE, Kabam, GREE, EA and Milkman Games – and really amazing responses from the game developer community. All of the announcement information can be found in the blog post from Adobe Gaming director Emmy Huang, but we also wanted to share the recap video below for those who couldn’t make it in person.

Thanks for showing your continued support for Adobe Gaming technologies and check out the new Adobe Game Developer Tools in the Creative Cloud.

1:42 PM Permalink

Adobe Delivers New Game Developer Tools in Creative Cloud

We are thrilled to announce the release of our first Game Developer Tools in the Adobe Creative Cloud, giving developers and publishers access to a powerful set of resources in one central location. Adobe’s Game Developer Tools are designed to streamline the game development process from creation to deployment, and help game publishers and developers reach the broadest possible audience worldwide – over 1.3 billion connected Windows and Mac PCs and over 500 million smartphones and tablets – 20 times the reach of the bestselling Xbox 360 gaming console.

The gaming community is already buzzing about Adobe Scout, an advanced next-generation profiling tool that uncovers granular internal information in ActionScript-based mobile and browser content to unlock significant performance optimization opportunities. We’ve received rave reviews from developers who have been using pre-release versions of Scout to gain powerful insights and who are already enhancing their development processes with our Game Developer Tools.

As a special promotion, we’re including this first release of Scout in a free membership to Creative Cloud, along with the rest of our Game Developer Tools, including the Adobe Gaming SDK, Adobe Flash C++ Compiler, and trial versions of Flash Professional CS6 and Flash Builder 4.7 Premium:

–          The Adobe Gaming SDK provides the essential building blocks developers need to create and monetize amazing ActionScript games across browsers and mobile devices, including open source 2D and 3D frameworks (Starling, Feathers, and Away3D), and is a simple starting point for both new and experienced game developers.

–          The Adobe Flash C++ Compiler is a new tool chain that allows game developers to take native games and game engines for PCs, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and iOS and compile them to run directly on the web across browsers on over 1.3 billion connected PCs using Adobe Flash Player.

–          Adobe Flash Professional CS6 is an authoring tool to create engaging animation and games, including support for delivering animated assets ready for use with Starling and many other popular frameworks, and Adobe Flash Builder 4.7 Premium is an advanced ActionScript development environment that can be used to develop high-performance mobile and browser-based games. Flash Builder 4.7 Premium also improves productivity and time to market with support for the new ASC 2.0 compiler and the ability to test and debug apps directly on Apple iOS devices through USB or on the iOS simulator.

Creative Cloud paid membership includes full versions of Flash Professional and Flash Builder and will also include future versions of Scout following the introductory promotion. Of course, paid members also get access to all of the Creative Suite 6 apps, including other popular tools for game design, such as Photoshop and Illustrator.

The Adobe Flash Player has been at the forefront of online gaming for years and is used to power the 10 most popular games on Facebook including SongPop, FarmVille2, and Diamond Dash. Adobe’s latest Gaming technologies are the leading choice for social game studios like Zynga, Wooga and KIXEYE and are used by AAA game developers like Ubisoft as well as indie developers like Northway and Damp Gnat to help minimize the cost of targeting multiple platforms and mobile devices – including games for iPhones and iPads. Today’s release of Game Developer Tools makes it much easier for developers to maximize productivity, game quality and reach across PCs and mobile devices.

We’ll be celebrating this launch at our San Francisco office this evening with many local developers and publishers. Please feel free to stop by, or keep an eye out for a recap video in the next few days on Adobe’s Gaming YouTube channel. And, to find out more about the new Game Developer Tools and the Adobe Creative Cloud, visit gaming.adobe.com/getstarted.

6:18 PM Permalink