Adobe Systems Incorporated

Download and Share: Market Assets and Creative Cloud for Desktop

Get a headstart on projects with Creative Cloud Market and ensure that you and your team can access your favorite assets anytime, anywhere with Creative Cloud Libraries.

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Creative Cloud Market

Creative Cloud Market is a collection of professionally crafted and curated vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, brushes, and more from the best creatives on Behance. Already there are thousands of assets available on Market and the number grows with each passing day. With Creative Cloud paid subscription (except the photography plan), you are entitled to download up to 500 free, unique, ready-to-use, and royalty free assets every month. Once downloaded, you can use them freely in your creative projects, and modify or build upon them according to your needs.

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Access Market

Creative Cloud for desktop app is a gateway to Creative Cloud Market. Using Creative Cloud for desktop, you can browse, search, sort, or download Market assets.

To access Market from Creative Cloud for desktop, choose Assets > Market. Then search assets by specifying a keyword, category, tag, or creator in the search box. You can further refine or sort results from the options available in the All Categories dropdown.



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Download assets from Market

To download an asset, click the asset thumbnail, click Download, and choose an existing Creative Cloud library or create a new library where the asset will be downloaded. Downloaded assets are also saved in the Market Downloads folder in your main Creative Cloud Files folder.



CCMarket_4In addition to the information like the asset name and the creator, the asset page also shows tags applied to the asset. You can click any tag, to search for other assets that are tagged with the same keywords, to find related and similar assets. For example, clicking the “pen” tag in the above example will search and display other assets tagged with pen.



CCMarket_5Downloaded assets are now available for use across all desktop and mobile apps and devices. Note: Creative Cloud for desktop must be running for downloaded assets to sync and become available for use. You can view downloaded assets in Creative Cloud for desktop by clicking the dropdown menu next to Market and selecting Downloaded under the Sort category.



For more information about downloading and using Market assets, see Creative Cloud Market.

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Share assets and collaborate using Creative Cloud Libraries

While you can access downloaded Market assets in all apps and on all devices, in some situations you may want to share assets with your team, so that everybody is in sync. You can achieve this by sharing the Creative Cloud Libraries where assets are downloaded. It allows you to collaborate while maintaining consistency in your designs.

You can share a library from Creative Cloud Assets or the Libraries panel in Adobe Photoshop CC or Adobe Illustrator CC.

In addition to downloading Market assets, you can add more assets to Libraries using mobile apps and Creative Cloud Assets. For more information about working with Libraries, see Creative Cloud Libraries.

Helpful resources

Creative Cloud blog
Creative Cloud help

11:55 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Broadway Malyan, A Return on Design

A distinguished architecture firm applies experience, skills, and cutting-edge Adobe Creative Cloud applications to exceed client expectations.

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Distinguished by its global reach with 16 studios across world centers, unrivaled diversity with over 500 design experts, and distinctive client focus with more than 75% of its income from repeat business, Broadway Malyan creates world-class, fully integrated cities, places, and buildings to unlock lasting value and deliver “return on design.”

Unlike most firms, Broadway Malyan’s myriad of projects often extend beyond traditional architecture. In addition to its architectural focus, the firm’s designers visualize and shape many different aspects of their design with a holistic approach resulting in a level of detail that can extend to branding and equipment design. Both architects and designers at Broadway Malyan depend on Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise and Adobe Acrobat Pro, purchased through an Enterprise Term License Agreement (ETLA), to delight clients with their imaginative, useful, and beautiful creations, tailored to meet customer needs.

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Broadway Malyan’s priority is to excel for the benefit of clients through a focus on quality, collaboration, and delivery. To achieve superb results, employees rely daily on a variety of Adobe applications; Adobe Illustrator CC, Photoshop CC, and InDesign CC are mainstays for designing buildings, collateral materials, and finessing client proposals and presentations. Acrobat Pro is essential to both designers and architects for combining multiple file types and sharing them as universally accessible PDF files with clients, as well as internally among staff collaborating on projects across the company’s global offices.

Enabling business expansion and flexibility

Equipping its 550 users worldwide with the most up-to-date versions of Adobe software was an ongoing challenge for the IT department. The sheer number of users, geographic diversity, and varying needs and skill sets within the firm made software provisioning complicated and time consuming.

The firm often combines teams with the most relevant talents from around the globe to work together on projects. Whether they’re located in Shanghai or Warsaw, people need the right software. In the past, the firm provided some applications on designated resource computers at each location. Users had to leave their desks to access applications like Acrobat Pro, which impacted their productivity.

To furnish all employees with what they need to do their best work, right at their fingertips, the team purchased Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, a solution that accommodates rapid growth while reducing IT complexity through an ETLA with Adobe. “The Adobe enterprise term license agreement is fantastic—it’s the way I like to work,” says Alexandre Vasconcelos, head of IT for Broadway Malyan. “We use a number of different types of software in the company, and I would rate Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise in the top three in terms of the way the licensing works.”

BroadwayM_3 Through the enterprise agreement, the firm can juggle the fluctuations of a project-based business. Employees can obtain and install Adobe software regardless of their location. As the company expands and morphs, it has the flexibility to add software licenses or move them to the other side of the globe as needed, without cumbersome, far-flung license deactivation and reactivation.

Simplified, fast IT

Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise has dramatically streamlined tasks for IT. The software installation process is fast and intuitive, and Creative Cloud for enterprise provides full visibility into what software each user has, simplifying license management.

To implement Creative Cloud for enterprise applications, Broadway Malyan used Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM); it made it easier and faster to distribute the new software worldwide via remote control.

The IT team set up company-wide Adobe software installation for Illustrator CC, InDesign CC, and Photoshop CC, which took only 15 minutes to install simultaneously on each computer—a process that previously required an hour and a half. “Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise has made a major positive change in the way we deploy software,” says Vasconcelos. “Employees can simply request specifi applications that they need and have them installed quickly and easily.”

Distribution of Acrobat Pro using SCCM was similarly fast and straightforward. “Using Microsoft SCCM, we installed Acrobat Pro in three offices a day and it took only five minutes per office, so there was no negative impact on productivity,” says Vasconcelos. “All of our offices were up and running with the software in just five days.”

Productivity on the rise

With Creative Cloud for enterprise, Broadway Malyan is bolstering productivity among employees. Architects and designers no longer have to find a computer with the proper software installed; instead, they can download and install precisely the right software applications to meet the most pressing needs for the project at hand.

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With a global team, the use of different software versions previously caused file incompatibility issues that could bring projects to a temporary halt. If one studio started on a file and sent it to another to finish off overnight, any issues with interoperability could cause difficulty in completing the project on time. With Creative Cloud, all studios are always on the most up-to-date software versions, eliminating interoperability issues or the need for time-consuming , manual file conversions.

In addition to creative applications, everyone now has the same version of Acrobat Pro. They can open files, combine multiple file types, convert PDFs to Microsoft Office applications if needed, and print and share them among clients and coworkers. “Now, everyone can take advantage of the file conversion and consumption benefits Adobe Acrobat offers without having to go to a dedicated computer to accomplish their work,” says Vasconcelos.

Agile and flexible

License forecasting and management are straightforward, and consume far less IT time. Budgeting is no longer a required exercise; instead, Broadway Malyan pays a fixed cost each year and adjusts it accordingly as the company grows. The number of software licenses can grow and be moved from location to location on an as-needed basis, without business disruption. As the business evolves, every machine in the firm can be adapted to the most current business requirements.

Next, Broadway Malyan plans to use the Enterprise Dashboard in Creative Cloud for enterprise to allow administrators to more easily manage user accounts. The firm is also tapping Adobe Expert Services to help users with quick installation or deployment questions and technical troubleshooting of individual products.

“Adobe is our go-to for creative software, and Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise has made us extremely agile and flexible company wide,” says Vasconcelos. “Our enterprise agreement with Adobe saves time and improves productivity.”

Read the Broadway Malyan case study.

11:27 AM Comments (1) Permalink

An Adobe Inspire Webinar with Designer Maria Grønlund

Designer Maria Grønlund will demonstrate her I speak fluid colors technique on January 14 during the inaugural session of Adobe Inspire’s new webinar series Inspire: Artists at Work.

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With its new series, “Inspire: Artists at Work,” the Adobe Inspire team wanted to provide something a bit different from a typical online tutorial. We envisioned events that would not only give participants new skills and teach them new techniques, but also spark their creativity and inspire them to try new things. We wanted to provide an over-the-shoulder look at an artists’ creative processes, as well as a peek at their inspirations.

So we were thrilled when Danish graphic designer Maria Grønlund agreed to join us for our first event. We’re big fans of Maria’s beautiful abstract creations—she is well known for her work’s vibrant colors and for her innovative methods.

During the one-hour event on Wednesday, January 14 (at 10:00am PST/6:00pm GMT), Maria will be demonstrating and discussing (in a conversation with Adobe worldwide design evangelist Rufus Deuchler) the Adobe Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC  techniques she employed to create her I speak fluid colors series.

An image from Maria Grønlund's I speak fluid color series was used as the visual identity for Adobe MAX 2014.

An image from Maria Grønlund’s I speak fluid color series was used as the visual identity for Adobe MAX 2014.

“I fell in love with Maria’s red, orange, and blue version of I speak fluid colors,” says Adobe creative director Kashka Pregowska-Czerw. “Very imaginative, great composition, and so visually appealing. I thought it was a perfect fit for Adobe MAX. The idea that it was digitally created from scratch was a nice bonus. I think our attendees agreed.”

Maria bases her images on organic shapes such as flowers, smoke, and ink suspended in water. She says, “These are digital drawings developed primarily for aesthetics. It’s a study in colors and Illustrator CC techniques…in principle, there’s no right or wrong way to interpret the drawings. It’s a bit like watching the clouds and finding rabbits and sheep in the shapes—though [they are] created with the intention of evoking a positive and light feel.”

The process by which Maria creates these images begins with an outline in Illustrator CC (based on a shape found in nature or even a simple doodle); she then employs blend shapes, gradients, and other Illustrator tools. The results are surprising forms with a 3D look.

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Formerly a classical musician, Maria made the switch to graphic design when she was in her mid-30s and describes herself as a self-taught designer. She has a unique approach to learning new software and has said that she simply sets herself the task of learning one tool each day. In that way, she wrote in a recent blog post, she “has no expectations as to what the outcome might be or what the tools are supposed to produce. The work method is pretty much driven by curiosity.”

Terri Stone, Adobe Inspire’s content director, explains, “Illustrator CC is a complex, powerful application, and that can be a little intimidating. But if we approach it like Maria—with a sense of curiosity, not fear—we’ll get unique results and a deeper understanding of the possibilities.”

We hope anyone with an interest in Illustrator CC will join Maria and Rufus for this inspiring hour. Register now for the free January 14 webinar.
 
Don’t worry if you can’t join us live on January 14; we’ll be posting a recording of the event on inspire.adobe.com (sign up for our free newsletter to stay informed about upcoming events).

12:22 PM Permalink

The 4K Production Workflow of Nippon Television Network

Japanese broadcaster, Nippon Television Network, implements a cost-effective solution based on Adobe Creative Cloud to create a dynamic and efficient workflow for ultra-high definition 4K broadcasts.

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When the first 4K channel in Japan, Channel 4K, began test broadcasts, it started by airing live musical performances, travelogues, and sports broadcasts provided for free by members of the Next Generation Television & Broadcasting Promotion Forum. Since then, broadcasters have started to produce their own 4K programming , but the equipment remains costly. In addition, transcoding and outputting programs takes a great deal of time.

Originally a format developed for feature-length films, 4K was not intended for television programming where high volume production is valued. To begin introducing original 4K content in the broadcast space, Nippon Television Network Corporation (Nippon TV) developed a 4K programming production workflow using Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

The benefits of enterprise licenses

Since 1953, when Nippon TV became the first commercial television broadcaster in Japan, Nippon TV has entertained audiences with excellent programming, from professional sports to scripted dramas. Nippon TV first deployed Adobe Creative Cloud for 4K productions in the technical operations department of the engineering & technology division. This department handles a wide variety of operations, including CG, data broadcasts, media conversion, and remote subsystems. The department’s office space is filled with computers—some loaded with Autodesk Softimage to create CG infographics, while others are used to develop other graphics displayed within programs.

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When deciding between teams or enterprise licensing, the technical operations department chose to work with Creative Cloud for enterprise. “For security reasons, our work computers are not connected to the Internet so the enterprise license was a better fit for us,” says Ayato Fujii, CG designer for the technical operations department, engineering & technology division. “Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise includes all of the design tools we need: Adobe Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, and After Effects CC.”

“We have always used Adobe creative software, and now Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise offers us a cost- effective way to provide everyone with the applications they need,” adds Toru Fujihara, associate managing director of the technical operations department, engineering & technology division. Yasuo Tsutsumi, CG designer in the graphic design department at the Nippon Television Art Media Design Center adds, “With Adobe Creative Cloud, we can install a full range of creative software onto all of our designers’ computers, which has everyone very excited.”

Developing high-quality 4K content

The technical operations department deployed Creative Cloud for enterprise on the workstations of all designers. The Creative Cloud implementation provided an opportunity to also switch from EDIUS editing systems to Adobe Premiere Pro CC to reduce costs, add integration with After Effects CC, and support the Grass Valley HQ/HQX codecs. “We do a great deal of CG work for our TV broadcasts,” says Fujii. “By using the Grass Valley HQ codec with Adobe Premiere Pro CC, we can attach 4K monitors to our work computers to create true 4K machines that leverage Adobe’s support for cutting-edge hardware and standards.”

Designing a new environment

One of the first 4K programs Fujihara worked to develop for Nippon TV using Creative Cloud was a video art exhibit across three 4k screens recreating the famous stone garden at Ryoanji Temple in Kyoto. The video was displayed in the “Kyoto from Inside and Outside: Scenes on Panels and Folding Screens” special exhibit at Tokyo National Museum. Nippon TV designers used Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Photoshop CC to pull the footage together and give visitors a taste of Ryoanji Temple across four seasons.

Four Seasons of the Ryoanji Temple Rock Garden in 4K, from the special exhibition, “Kyoto from Inside and Outside: Scenes on Panels and Folding Screens."

Four Seasons of the Ryoanji Temple Rock Garden in 4K, from the special exhibition, “Kyoto from Inside and Outside: Scenes on Panels and Folding Screens.”

Shooting at Ryoanji Temple started one year before the exhibition. At the time, Nippon TV did not have an environment that could view 4K footage so the team decided to implement a turnkey system that supported 4K in native resolution. One of the deciding factors for the system was that it also needed to support 60 frames per second.

“We produced the Ryoanji Temple footage in 30p, so there was no need for 60p support for that project,” says Fujihara. “However, we knew that we would need 60p support for future broadcasts that may involve fast motion, such as sports programming. By deploying Creative Cloud on Windows workstations loaded with Epoch 4K Supernova cards from BlueFish, we achieved a system similar to turnkey systems.”

Pitching live baseball broadcasts

Another project driven by Nippon TV was a broadcast of the October 2013 professional baseball match between the Yomiuri Giants and the Yakult Swallows in Tokyo Dome recorded using four 4K cameras and one high-speed camera. Unlike other types of content, baseball broadcasts fill a very long slot in the schedule.

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First, Nippon TV shot the action in Tokyo Dome using five cameras, four of which recorded in SR-Lite mode on Sony’s Simple Studio Profile (SStP) codec. Next, the team edited the 4K footage on the Premiere Pro CC timeline and exported the final program in XAVC format. “When we started on our programs, Premiere Pro CC was one of the only applications that could output in XAVC format,” says Fujihara. “We knew we wanted to use XAVC output from the start, but being able to use Premiere Pro CC through final delivery really helped our workflow. We could not have produced the two 4K videos without Premiere Pro CC.”

Fujii concludes, “From a creator’s point of view, it’s a chance we couldn’t pass up. We’re glad to have Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise to help us continue to push the creativity limits of our production broadcasts.”

Read the Nippon Television Network case study.

9:59 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud and Microsoft Surface Pro 3

The new Touch workspace in the latest release of Adobe Illustrator CC is the long-awaited return of the artist’s canvas recreated on the Microsoft Surface Pro 3.

While Microsoft Surface Pro has had the power to run Adobe apps like Adobe Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC, small UI controls (which were optimized for desktop use), and a lack of touch support made using the apps a cumbersome experience. For over a year, Adobe and Microsoft have been collaborating to bring the full power of Creative Cloud to a mobile experience optimized for pen and touch.

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New Touch workspace in Illustrator CC

Illustrator CC has introduced a new workspace designed with Surface Pro 3 in mind. This Touch workspace lets designers create on the go what they could once only accomplish sitting at their desks. This new workspace exposes the core tools and controls for drawing and editing, optimized for multi-touch gestures and a pressure-sensitive pen.

Enabling productivity in a touch environment with a complex desktop application like Illustrator CC meant rethinking it for the touch metaphor. In the Touch workspace, the user interface is streamlined to expose the most used/most needed tools and controls, with larger icons that can be easily targeted with a stylus or finger on a small screen. Common key commands, such as Ctrl-Z to undo, have been accommodated in a working environment where a keyboard may not be available, or only available as a digital keyboard that requires extra actions to open/close.

The usage data has been very encouraging with around 80% of first-time users becoming active users of the new Touch workspace. The tendency has been that once you try it, you continue to use it for creation. We are seeing exponential growth in the number of users using Illustrator CC on touch-enabled devices like Microsoft Surface Pro 3, and the Touch workspace allows users to get the most out of their investment in new hardware.

An illustrated presentation of how to draw in this new Touch workspace can be found here.

Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC: Optimized for touch and pen

With enhanced pen and stylus support in the latest releases of Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC, the user experience is better than ever, enabling users to create on the go, closer to their inspiration or while just kicking back on the couch at home.

The active stylus on Surface Pro 3 provides on hover functionality—a better user experience than what is possible via passive styli. Further, the very high-quality stylus allows creative professionals to draw directly on the device, with pressure sensitivity, thus freeing them from the typical, “look here, draw there” way of working.

Additionally, pen and touch can potentially eliminate the need to have your non-dominant hand on the CTRL, SHIFT, ALT, and Z keys on the keyboard as you use apps like Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC. The movements are now as natural as if you weren’t on a computer at all and were just doing brush strokes on a canvas.

More to come

The future offers very interesting possibilities for user interface innovation on touch- and stylus-enabled devices like Surface Pro 3 that are capable of running Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC. Watch these two videos to get a glimpse into what’s coming:

Adobe MAX 2014 Sneaks: Shaper Tool

The future of Adobe creative applications on Microsoft devices

Now, you can take that vacation in Paris and sit on the Left Bank of the Seine to create your masterpiece in an environment that allows your creative genius to roam freely and naturally.

9:06 AM Permalink

An Early Holiday Surprise: New Collaboration with Creative Cloud Libraries

Since the introduction of Creative Cloud Libraries at Adobe MAX in early October, we’ve been listening to your feedback and actively working to update the features you want to see.

Shared Libraries: You asked. We delivered.

We heard what our customers were saying. So we got to work. And… we have an early holiday gift for you: brand new collaboration and management features in Creative Cloud Libraries.

Creative Cloud Libraries connects to your Creative Profile, making your favorite images, colors, text styles (and more) available to you and your creative team anywhere and anytime. Easily maintain consistency with standardized and branded project assets or style guides. Create and collaborate with a library of shared assets in Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and mobile apps, and easily organize your libraries and rename move and copy individual assets in them.

Watch Paul Trani demonstrate the new collaboration and management features in Share assets in Photoshop and Illustrator using Creative Cloud Libraries then give Creative Cloud Libraries a roll and let us know what you think.

For more information about Creative Cloud Libraries, check out these resources:
Shared Libraries in Photoshop
Shared CC Libraries in Illustrator
Creative Cloud Help / Creative Cloud Libraries
Creative Cloud Help / Collaborate on folders and libraries

11:59 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud for Desktop: Powerful Design Using Fonts from Typekit

Typography can make or break a design. While many apps provide precise typographic controls, it’s important to start with the perfect font. Adobe Typekit opens the door to thousands of fonts for use on the web or in desktop applications.

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Every paid Creative Cloud complete membership includes the Typekit Portfolio plan, which provides access to the full library of web and desktop fonts. (If you have a free Creative Cloud subscription, you still get a selection of fonts as part of the Typekit trial plan.)

To access Typekit fonts, you just need to sign in to your Typekit account with the same Adobe ID and password you use for your Creative Cloud membership.


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Quick syncing

The Creative Cloud for desktop app syncs desktop fonts to your computer effortlessly. If the Creative Cloud for desktop app is not installed, you will be prompted to download it when you sync fonts using the Typekit account.

In the Creative Cloud app, navigate to the Assets tab and select the Fonts tab to see your current synced fonts and search for new fonts to add. While browsing the fonts library, you can narrow down the fonts for desktop use by enabling the Desktop Use filter in the filtering panel. You can then sync fonts and use them in any application installed on your computer. For more information, see Browse and add fonts from Typekit.

For information about how to use synced fonts in various Creative Cloud applications, see Work with fonts from Typekit in Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Adobe After Effects CC.


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Offline use

Synced desktop fonts are available for use even when you’re offline, as long as the Creative Cloud for desktop app is running and you’re signed in. If you quit the Creative Cloud app, synced fonts become temporarily unavailable; signing out from the Creative Cloud app removes synced fonts from your computer. When you sign in again, the fonts are automatically re-synced from Typekit.


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Easy font management

You can view synced desktop fonts in the Fonts panel of the Creative Cloud for desktop app, or manage them through your Typekit account. You can also turn font sync on or off from the Preferences panel of the Creative Cloud for desktop app. For more information, see Manage synced fonts.


Go ahead, sync some fonts, and let us know how it goes. For additional help with Typekit and syncing Creative Cloud fonts, you might find the following helpful:

11:23 AM Permalink

Moleskine + Creative Cloud: Create without Confinement

The Moleskine Smart Notebook and Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app: The raw beginning of putting pencil to paper. The precision of digital composition. From paper to vector in an instant.

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Sure, Adobe has a bunch of mobile, digital drawing apps for people to capture and create whenever they’re away from their desks. However, we also know there are people who love the tactility of drawing on paper… It’s why we’re so jazzed that paper heavyweight Moleskine has taken advantage of our Creative SDK to make it easier to move creative ideas from paper to screen.

From an analog start in the Moleskine Smart Notebook, to a digital transformation by the magic of the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app (powered by Adobe’s Creative SDK), comes a condensed creative process that turns hand-drawn sketches into workable digital files—accessible from Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Here’s how it works:

Draw: Creative journeys start with a line

Sure, it could happen at a desk, but inspiration and creativity usually spark when creative thinkers are distracted from the task at hand. The Smart Notebook provides the blank space to capture the flickers of inspiration, wherever and whenever they spark. How the pages get filled depends on the person.

So draw. Sketch. Jot. Take notes. Preferably with broad strokes (as opposed to shading) on any page. Using any tool (black ink and markers work best).

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Capture: From paper to screen

If Moleskine’s Smart Notebook is the place to collect the flares of inspiration then its Creative Cloud connected app is the bridge to move them into the digital realm.

Download the Moleskine app for iPhone then use the phone’s camera to capture what’s been put on paper. Page markers in the Smart Notebook detect the orientation of the image as well as help correct perspective and alignment distortion before saving JPGs as SVGs. Filter settings help correct poor lighting or too-light drawing lines.

Not satisfied with the result of the JPG file, before converting it to SVG? Simple. Change the settings or reshoot.

Sync & Refine: Expand the ideas

Sync with Creative Cloud to store both files (JPG and SVG) in the Creative Cloud Assets folder. Then open and edit in Photoshop or Illustrator CC (or refine and use the JPG files in other CC desktop and mobile apps). When the work is complete, step back and see how far the idea has traveled. (Give Illustrator and Photoshop CC a try. Free.)

Start drawing outside the box

Ideas are born at all times of day. In the most unexpected places. Capture them before they’re lost:
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  • Order and carry a Moleskine Smart Notebook, to capture ideas when inspiration strikes.
  • Use the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app to photograph the concepts on paper and transform them to digital files.
  • Then, sync to Creative Cloud, and import them into Illustrator or Photoshop CC to refine them and bring them to life.

Creating without boundaries. It’s that easy.

12:10 PM Permalink

An Illustrator Goes Hollywood

The anticipation and excitement of attending his first Adobe MAX inspired the art; a band and a human rights movement inspired its title. Behind Orlando Arocena’s Brave Leon art.

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It’s a certainty that anyone who’s visited the Adobe Illustrator CC Facebook or who uses Illustrator CC is familiar with Orlando Arocena‘s vector art. But when we asked him to attend Adobe MAX as a MAX Insider (someone who would share personal insights about the conference), he remembered his mother’s advice about being a good guest: “Never show up empty-handed.”

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Coupled with a bit of restless energy and a traffic jam, her advice led to a “mental sketch” just one day before he was scheduled to be in Los Angeles. Sketching in his mind is the only type Orlando does; he explained his process during a recent lecture at Pratt Institute: “Although I do a significant amount of research regarding my mental sketches, over time I realized that I wanted to eliminate the stiff rigors of the standard process of sketch, scan, trace; so I rarely do any pre-sketching on paper. I’m a big fan of energy and confidence and running with them from start to finish, harnessing the excitement of starting a project.”

Pop culture meets Hollywood icon

Fueled by music, Orlando sat down at his computer and began to draw. Six hours later his art, part pop culture icon and part Hollywood homage, emerged…

In it was a connection to location (Hollywood), and the band (Kings of Leon) he learned would be playing at the Adobe MAX Bash: “I wanted my vector to be a pop-icon parody, leveraging established elements synonymous with Hollywood that, when composed, would also represent a Kings of Leon-at-Adobe MAX-in LA gig poster.”

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Keeping the subject matter rooted in Hollywood—by incorporating Art Deco embellishments and a color palette reminiscent of Hollywood’s Golden Age—he also kept it relevant to a modern audience (and specifically to Adobe’s creative audience), with tattoos. But not just ANY tattoos, but icons from Adobe’s tools palettes. “I decided to inject elements from the tools menus that, for me, represent customization and are found in practically every Adobe application: the Fill/Stroke, the Eye-Dropper and the Arrow (depicted as a piercing rather than a selection tool).”

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The essence of an illustration

During that initial drawing session, Orlando shared his progress on his Facebook. Despite the online support and encouragement of an audience hoping he was creating a vector Wizard of Oz tribute, he stopped just short of revealing the final illustration. Instead, he put the artwork aside, deciding to finish it up the next day, just hours before his flight.

After printing two artists proofs to “get a closer look at any errors or misalignment, and to make notes of questionable areas to address on the vector file,” he printed an 18 x 24 foil print (on his own giclée printer) and took off for the airport.

It wasn’t until after Lee Hirsch, the documentary filmmaker behind The Bully Project, took the stage and touched his heart that the circumstances surrounding this personal project and the fictional character in it, came together for Orlando. He realized, “What began as Kings of Leon-at-Adobe MAX-in LA gig poster was no longer just that; it had transformed into something more. The true spirit of the image was revealed and my vector had become the Cowardly Lion who had found courage at Adobe MAX—thanks to The Bully Project.”

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That’s the story of how Brave Leon came together for this gifted artist: An invitation, a band, a movement, and Illustrator CC.


Orlando_6_AiLogoAdobe Illustrator CC. Try it for 30 days. Free. On us. Make something.

10:05 AM Permalink

Purcell: Preserving The Past, Designing The Future

A top heritage and conservation architectural firm gains competitive edge with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

The Hyde Dillington House, Somerset. © Will Pryce

The Hyde Dillington House, Somerset. © Will Pryce

Proud heritage, cutting edge

For more than six decades, Purcell has been involved in the care and development of some of the best-loved buildings and places in the United Kingdom and abroad. Its team of expert architects, heritage consultants, and surveyors share a passion for the thoughtfully designed evolution of buildings, places, and communities. From start to finish, the company’s expertise includes funding and planning advice, heritage consultancy, conservation, and architectural design, delivered from sixteen offices in the United Kingdom and one in Hong Kong.

Whether marketers are generating eye-catching proposals for winning new business or technical staff are crafting and visualizing intelligent, sustainable, and creative architectural solutions, employees at Purcell turn day in and day out to Adobe creative software. Providing employees with the latest Adobe applications is now easier with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, purchased through an Enterprise Term License Agreement (ETLA).

“Our specialty is heritage architecture and conservation, and we’re at the top of the game,” says Gary Dalton, head of ICT for Purcell. “We have more of an edge because we are now all using Adobe Creative Cloud.”

Adobe from start to finish

Adobe creative software is widely used throughout the firm, from project bidding through to reporting with clients during the course of each project to completion. Marketers use Adobe InDesign CC to generate three to four 50- to 200-page project proposals weekly, replete with graphics generated in Adobe Illustrator CC and imagery finessed in Adobe Photoshop CC. Graphic designers rely on Illustrator CC to create posters, advertisements, and other marketing materials.

Once a project is awarded and underway, architects employ Photoshop CC to color hand-sketched mockups of buildings and environments. Administrators, architects, and other professionals at the firm collaborate using a combination of Adobe software to generate image-rich progress reports. All of these materials must be visually beautiful and feature impeccable quality to reflect positively on Purcell as a design and architecture leader with an eye for aesthetics.

Leighton House Museum, London. © Will Pryce

Leighton House Museum, London. © Will Pryce

Wowing potential clients

For decades, Purcell has been the go-to firm for the heritage and conservation segment of the architecture market in the United Kingdom and abroad. In recent years, the firm has seen increasing competition from larger firms offering lower prices, but lacking the specialized expertise and quality Purcell offers. To win against these larger players, Purcell redoubled its bidding and communication efforts to rise above the crowd. That required upping the ante on bids to put the right information in the right format and make proposals exceptionally striking.

“Although the building market has picked up over the last few years, we still have to outdo ourselves to win business,” says Emily Seldon, bid manager at Purcell. “We must create bids that are beautiful and make potential clients feel special. This points to the need to have the latest features and functionality in Adobe Creative Cloud so we can push our creativity limits.”

Moving to the cloud

Until recently, Purcell was using various versions of Adobe Creative Suite software, and needed to upgrade Adobe software across all offices. The ICT team struggled with figuring out how to move and track software licenses as offices and teams expanded.

In one instance, ICT needed to install more Creative Suite licenses for new users in a particular office to accommodate expansion. Facing budgetary limitations, purchasing new upgraded licenses for the entire department was not an option. But purchasing the most current version of Creative Suite for just a few users meant that ICT had to set up a dedicated machine to back-save files to earlier versions, causing productivity losses because staff found it difficult to collaborate on files.

With the availability of Creative Cloud, the firm had several priorities in mind. ICT wanted better flexibility to equip employees with the right software to deliver their best work in the context of business growth and employee additions. Additionally, putting everyone on the same version to avoid the cumbersome process of back-saving files to earlier versions for sharing was a top priority.

“We need to be leaders, especially in the ability to work collaboratively,” says Dalton. “Overall, any type of efficiency is worth it to us—it’s about working smarter, not harder.”

When he saw Adobe’s ETLA for purchasing Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, Dalton realized it would allow Purcell to manage company growth spurts in a very straightforward way. “The flexibility of the Adobe enterprise agreement helps us plan for now and the future,” says Dalton. “It’s straightforward, as we now know who is using what and I can just add licenses as we go—everyone is always on the most current version.”

Streamlined implementation

Purcell deployed licenses of Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, starting with the communications group, where Seldon and seven others in marketing tested the new software. The team was tasked with discovering new features and potential stumbling blocks before initiating a company-wide deployment across seventeen offices. After one month, the communications team had found many advancements in functionality.

After the successful pilot, ICT rolled out Creative Cloud for enterprise company-wide. The ICT team used Creative Cloud Packager to deploy applications based on different languages and operating systems. Dalton put together a custom software package for Purcell that includes the firm’s core applications: Illustrator CC, InDesign CC, Photoshop CC, and Adobe Acrobat XI Pro. He created another package tailored for a smaller team that required a specific feature set.

“The Creative Cloud Packager is truly brilliant in terms of easily pushing out software,” says Dalton. “I can take all the applications and features people need and deploy everything as an update to help ensure consistency.”

Stowe House, Buckinghamshire. © Jerry Hardman-Jones

Stowe House, Buckinghamshire. © Jerry Hardman-Jones

Feature-rich, easily learned

The move to Creative Cloud for enterprise has benefited staff seeing projects through from bidding to completion. For creative and technical teams, Creative Cloud for enterprise offers the ability to access the latest features in the context of a familiar interface and tools.

The marketing team especially appreciates new features in Acrobat Pro such as the ability to save PDF files to Microsoft PowerPoint for presentation to clients, or to convert images in PDF files to a format suitable for editing in Photoshop CC. Within InDesign CC, they appreciate the ability to create alternate page sizes without requiring extra plug-ins.

“We’ve found Adobe Creative Cloud easy to learn and use,” says Seldon. “With productivity gains and new features available through Adobe Creative Cloud, we are now able to generate proposals that are more image-rich and engaging, and that’s a big differentiator for us.”

Trouble-free for ICT

In the future, Purcell plans to tap Adobe Expert Services to help end users delve into new features and get their own questions answered and to use the Creative Cloud Enterprise Dashboard to administer and manage user accounts.
“Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise has a tremendous positive impact on our ability to present ourselves professionally, remain competitive, and continue growing our business,” says Dalton.

Read the Purcell case study.

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