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From Adobe Ideas to Adobe Illustrator Draw: Making The Switch

For quite some time, designer/illustrator Brian Yap has integrated mobile art applications into his professional creative workflow… His mobile app of choice? Adobe Ideas. He’s used the full-featured vector app to capture illustrative concepts, develop them, and later move them to Adobe Illustrator CC for fine-tuning. It’s led to a successful creative process and an identifiable Ideas-to-Illustrator illustration style.

Like many Adobe Ideas users, Brian recently made the switch to Adobe Illustrator Draw. After Brian’s Adobe MAX sessions (What’s New in Adobe Ideas and Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps), we asked him to share some of his initial thoughts about making the move. Here’s what he had to say:

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

Adobe Ideas was the most powerful vector drawing tool for the iPad, and it changed the way I thought about the device as a professional tool. Adobe Illustrator Draw is a continuing evolution of Ideas, and proves that the development team is listening and reacting to the community in way unheard of when it comes to graphics applications. Use it. Love it. Become part of its future development.

Of course I always have the immediate reaction, “Why does this thing I love need to change?” But it didn’t take long to fall in love again; besides some amazing enhancements to the drawing engine that I’ve grown to love, the UI has been totally designed with a lot of user feedback taken into account.

Overall, pretty much every time I panicked a bit because a feature I depended on seemed to be taken out, I not only found it a few seconds later, but quickly realized the thinking that went into the redesign. A few thoughts:

While the tools are generally the same, the icons are way more descriptive of what the tools actually do (something I always wondered about with Ideas). As an example, I always thought it was a bit confusing to have a pencil icon for a tool that didn’t have a pencil texture.

There were some cuts made to the tools but with a little trial it’s easy to see why: The “long press” while using a tool was always the same as the paint bucket so the paint bucket tool itself was somewhat unnecessary. Although I was always in the camp of the “long press” I imagine people who relied heavily on the paint bucket will find that change a bit tricky at first.

I like that the Gallery interface is in line with the other new apps that take more advantage of the connection to Behance and the Creative Cloud.

By far the biggest change is in the layers options; Draw is much more focused on the options for each layer. In Ideas, I was constantly merging layers I didn’t mean to merge. Now that the options are reached through touching the layer options icon on each layer, it’s always clear which layer is being affected. One tip: The merge down button is now under the icon that covers flipping the layer.

Finally, based on what I’ve heard, there is some concern about the lack of PDF export… I’ve been told that the option will be added back in a future update.

 

We’ve asked Brian to keep us updated about his Draw discoveries, so stay tuned to Adobe Drawing on Twitter and Facebook. And for a few tips about syncing Adobe Ideas files to Creative Cloud, Adobe Ideas: A Transformation is a quick read.

10:22 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Creative Cloud Libraries—Seamless Access to Creative Assets

Yesterday, in Los Angeles, during the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote we announced the best versions yet of our Creative Cloud desktop apps and services and new mobile apps… making your creative workflow across apps and devices easier than ever.

We also introduced Creative Cloud Libraries, a design system that provides seamless access to your creative assets across Creative Cloud’s desktop tools and its companion mobile apps and services (such as Creative Cloud Market).

Creative Cloud Libraries uses your Creative Profile to connect your favorite desktop tools, mobile apps and services to each other. Unlocked by your Adobe ID, your Creative Profile is a personalized hub that connects your favorite tools and content in one fluid creative experience.

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Creative ingredients

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Great content that moves and inspires is built on a foundation of creative ingredients (assets like colors, text styles, logos, icons, patterns, brushes and images) that you reuse and remix. Today, these ingredients are stored all over the place: on a laptop, on a file server, in cloud storage, or scribbled on a notepad or whiteboard. Finding them when you need them is always more difficult than it should be.

There’s something we learned from a professional chef’s kitchen—where all the ingredients necessary to prepare menu items are laid out and ready to use. In a pro kitchen, chefs prepare dishes quickly and efficiently without pausing to seek out an important ingredient right in the middle of the preparation. This setup even has a fancy name, “mise en place.’

Mise en Place by Charles Haynes.

Mise en Place by Charles Haynes.

Creative Cloud Libraries is like managing your own professional kitchen, helping you organize and prepare creative ingredients (assets) so that they are where you need them when you need them—in your apps, on the desktop, on your mobile devices, and on the web.


What can you put in your library? Lots of things!

  • Text Styles: In Photoshop and Illustrator CC collect and use all the text settings, from the basics (font size and font family) to the more advanced (OpenType discretionary ligatures). It’s a great way to use consistent text styling across applications which has, for some time, been a frequently requested feature from designers.
  • Layer Styles: In Photoshop CC, you can use layer styles to define graphic effects such as drop shadows, glows, bevels, strokes, and fills. And now they can be stored in your Creative Cloud Libraries and reused in other documents.
  • Brushes: With the new Adobe Brush CC app we make it incredibly easy to create new brushes right on your iPhone, which you can then use in Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC or on a tablet with Adobe Illustrator Draw. You can also find some beautiful brushes created by members of the Behance community. A part of your Creative Cloud membership, we’ve made a few available in Creative Cloud Market.
  • Graphics: There are all sorts of graphic elements you can store in your Creative Cloud Libraries—icons, logos, photos, textures, patterns. Some may be bitmaps, others vector-based; regardless of their original format, you can use them anywhere you can use graphics, and they will be automatically translated to the right format as needed.

Stay in sync

Creative Cloud Libraries are stored on your local device and automatically sync (the power of your Creative Profile) whenever you’re online. While you’re offline you can continue to use, add, remove or modify assets, and the next time you’re connected all of your changes will get synchronized automatically and any necessary updates merged to your local version.

Stay organized

There are many ways to use Creative Cloud Libraries, and you can create as many Creative Cloud Libraries as you’d like. Some suggestions:

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  • Collect the “go to” assets that you like to reuse across projects
  • Make a separate library for each project you’re working on, and group all related assets
  • Keep all of your branded assets in one library—like having your own brand guidelines with ready-to-use assets
  • Create a “kit” of user interface elements to quickly whip out screen prototypes
  • Keep a set of ingredients in a library to use for a campaign you’re working on
  • Gather a set of inspirational assets to build a virtual “mood board” for your next project

We’re sure you’ll come up with more ways to use them. Let us know in the comments below how you plan to use Libraries.

Connected creativity

Inspiration can strike anytime, anywhere. It doesn’t wait until you are conveniently sitting at your desk. With our new mobile apps, Adobe Brush CC, Adobe Shape CC and Adobe Color CC you can grab inspiration with your mobile device no matter where you are. Using your device’s camera, turn what you see around you into color themes with Adobe Color CC, create shapes and vector objects with Adobe Shape CC, and unique brushes with Adobe Brush CC.

Once stored in one of your Creative Cloud Libraries, you can use these assets in other mobile apps—such as Adobe Illustrator Draw or Adobe Photoshop Sketch, and you can use in your desktop apps, such as Photoshop CC or Illustrator CC.

To jump start your creativity, we have curated thousands of high-quality assets in Creative Cloud Market. These were created by members of the Behance community, and include useful icons and vector shapes, beautiful patterns, brushes and more. Available from the Creative Cloud desktop app, select any asset as well as the library you want it in, and the asset will appear right where you need it, through your Creative Profile, whether on a desktop or mobile.

Now it’s easy to start a project with your iPhone, continue on your tablet and finish on the desktop. Your creation process is moving effortlessly and fluidly between applications and locations. This is truly connected creativity.

What’s next?

To get started with Creative Cloud Libraries, download our new mobile apps for iOS today from the iTunes App Store. They’re free. Use them on their own or with our completely new Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC, available today as part of your Creative Cloud membership.

And don’t forget, if you’re attending Adobe MAX join us in our session How Creative Ingredients Fuel Creativity and Productivity to learn more about Creative Cloud Libraries.

Video tutorials

11:56 AM Permalink

Surface Design: The Art of Jenean Morrison

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When we asked painter/illustrator/textile designer Jenean Morrison to join us at Adobe MAX this year as a MAX Insider, we knew that she’d been using our mobile drawing apps to supplement her drawing/doodling/sketching habit. We had no idea, however, how often she used them nor how prolific she is.

It’s a love affair that began this year, in late spring, when Jenean, a long-time Adobe Illustrator CC user, picked up an iPad Air, a stylus, and started using Adobe Ideas to sketch wherever and whenever the mood struck. She was hooked. The artist, as she’s mentioned on her blog, likes to start her mornings making art: “If I’m in the middle of a painting, I like to jump right into it first thing with a cup or two of coffee. If I’m not working on a painting, then I usually sketch or make some patterns—or both.”

From Ideas to Illustrator CC:

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By July, Jenean was “head over heels” about her newly adopted creative process and had added Adobe Line and Adobe Ink & Slide to her creative toolkit. She began experimenting more and more with the potential of the apps and has become particularly fond of Line. Although designed for precise drawing and drafting, Jenean appreciates “the organic results from loosely playing with shapes and color.”

Sketching on her iPad has become a daily occurrence that she attributes to being enamored with her new drawing tools. In a July 24 blog post she wrote, “It’s so interesting how sometimes new tools—be they apps, devices, or something as simple as a new paintbrush or pen—can inspire you to do new things with your art.”

Using Adobe Line along with Ink & Slide:

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Jenean continues to use Line’s in-app tools to experiment with drawing techniques—erasing work she’s already done or putting a lighter color on top of a darker one—that she “could never do on paper.”

And, appreciating the freedom that comes with designing on a mobile device, she’s begun creating versions of images that before now she’d created using Illustrator CC. Experimenting with various combinations of freehand drawing, Ink & Slide, and the drafting templates in Line, she gets a pleasant mix of freeform lines and digital details.

Jenean’s new way of working gives her patterns, designs, and geometric prints new dimension and a new look:

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Jenean wasn’t an early adopter of drawing digital on mobile; now it sounds as if she wishes she hadn’t waited so long… “I resisted buying an iPad for the longest time. I just didn’t see the need for it in my life. When I finally got one several months ago, I realized I’d been missing out on a whole new wonderful way of creating art! I had no idea how much I would enjoy this.”

See so much more of Jenean’s work on her Instagram along with occasional insights into her inspiration and her process:

"Watching The Great Gatsby—what a gorgeous movie! Here's a pattern I'm working on inspired by Daisy's scarf. #ipadsketch #adobeline #surfacedesign"

“Watching The Great Gatsby—what a gorgeous movie! Here’s a pattern I’m working on inspired by Daisy’s scarf. #ipadsketch #adobeline #surfacedesign”

"Creating a palette for my next #ipadsketch. This is how I start most of my sketches. Once I get the colors just right I erase the scribbles and start the design! #adobeline #surfacedesign"

“Creating a palette for my next #ipadsketch. This is how I start most of my sketches. Once I get the colors just right I erase the scribbles and start the design! #adobeline #surfacedesign”


This article was compiled from a series of posts on Jenean Morrison’s website and Instagram.

12:54 PM Permalink

Building A World-class Infrastructure with Creative Cloud for Teams

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Prestige Group, India’s leading real estate developer, delivers superior quality design content using Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

One of the leading real estate developers in the southern states of India The Prestige Group (Prestige) works across the residential, commercial, retail, leisure, and hospitality sectors. Since its inception in 1986, Prestige has completed 177 projects which include apartment enclaves, shopping malls, and corporate structures.

A long-time Adobe customer, Prestige has used Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator for various stages of project execution; during the initial stages of idea creation and project conceptualization, the design team creates concept presentations: “It’s a collage of various photos and ideas to depict the overall project,” says Aditya Muley, business development and design manager at Morph Design Co., part of the Prestige Group. “In this stage, we use Photoshop extensively to edit multiple photos from the inventory and also from the Internet; Illustrator is useful when there is a requirement to create wallpaper and other designs of interior items,” says Muley.

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Once the concept is approved, the property floor plan and the layout is developed using AutoCAD or 3ds Max software. At this stage of concept development, the Prestige design team would once again use Photoshop extensively. “We use Photoshop to import or edit photos, provide multiple textures to the layout, add special effects, and finally to design different views, such as a top view or side view,” says Muley.

Version consistency and license management

Although the firm has been using Adobe creative tools rigorously, there were multiple challenges in terms of using the latest versions of these tools and managing the licenses. “Our traditional approach was to install new versions one, two, or three seats at a time. As a result, we might have designers using one version and the architect team using another, which could cause IT administration issues associated with maintaining multiple software versions,” says Venkat Rao, general manager, IT, Prestige. “We wanted our employees to uniformly use the latest and leading-edge solutions.” The use of the latest versions of the creative tools was vital for Prestige also from a compliance point of view.

Prestige decided to adopt Adobe Create Cloud for teams. “For a rapidly growing firm like ours, the biggest challenge is giving everyone access to the latest software and then tracking application allocations,” says Rao. “That’s why we were excited when we heard about the automated administration in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.” Prestige also realized that the latest versions of Adobe’s creative tools offer incredible integration, more features, and a greatly advanced—yet familiar—user interface with which its designers can work with higher efficiency. “The incompatibility issue was automatically resolved,” says Rao.

A streamlined migration process

The migration to Creative Cloud for teams went smoothly; post-implementation, Adobe held multiple training sessions on using the tools in Creative Cloud.

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Now with simplified access to all of the components in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams and no lag time between versions or upgrades, the designers are always updated. Adobe Creative Cloud for teams gives Prestige upgrades of the software upon release of new versions, plus exclusive features between releases, enabling them to stay up to date on the creative tools integral to their daily workflow.

Multiple new features of Adobe Creative Cloud tools are of great value to Prestige. Adobe Photoshop CC features include effects such as sun glare or artificial light, the ability to edit background and insert images, and ease of obtaining multiple views, which are extensively used by Prestige. “With Photoshop CC, one can directly edit and import textures into AutoCAD or 3ds Max,” says Muley. With Adobe Illustrator CC, Prestige can create new images from scratch, which can then be enlarged and sent out for printing. “We are thrilled with the newly added features of Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC,” says Muley. “In fact, with access to the latest versions of the software, we are empowered to experiment and invent new ideas in project design and execution.”

Maintaining design integrity with Adobe Acrobat CC

During various stages of the project; from conceptualization and design to execution, multiple project designs are required to be shared with internal and external groups of users for review and acceptance. Ensuring the security and integrity of these designs is vital. Also, sharing AutoCAD or 3ds Max design files with a wide group of users created issues. “We wanted the final output to be secured and optimized in its size in order to share it with the internal or external users,” says Muley. Prestige effectively addressed these challenges by standardizing on Adobe Acrobat Pro.

Prestige collaborates on projects across teams and with clients more easily. “We have never faced compatibility issues and the overall workflow has greatly improved with Acrobat,” says Muley.

Simplified management, big savings

The streamlined deployment and administration in Creative Cloud for teams has greatly helped the IT team at Prestige to eliminate many time-consuming manual processes, such as installing packaged software or maintaining version consistency. “We no longer need to perform updates one-by-one on machines as we now have the flexibility to install software onto computers on demand and activate new subscriptions as needed,” says Rao. Creative Cloud for teams has helped Prestige raise the productivity of the IT team by simplifying software administration with license management, automatic tracking, and version upgrades.

Creative Cloud for teams eliminates the need to manage software upgrades. Every employee has automatic access to the latest versions of Adobe products, which not only supports compatibility between workers but enables the company to take advantage of new features without worrying about the cost of upgrades.

For Prestige, Creative Cloud for teams has significantly reduced the total cost of ownership for Adobe solutions by creating a standardized model for purchasing and deploying the most current versions of Creative Cloud tools. “We like paying annually for Adobe Creative Cloud for teams. It’s a much more effective approach to budgeting as it eliminates lump-sum software purchases,” says Rao.

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Scalable for future expansion

With better control and higher visibility on license utilization Creative Cloud for teams is a scalable solution. “As our design and architect teams expand, Creative Cloud for teams readily supports us as licenses can be added on-the-fly without major cost implications,” says Rao.

It supports the company’s rapid growth and its ability to efficiently manage the workflow of large and complex real estate projects. “Adobe Creative Cloud for teams helps us become more productive by simplifying software administration with license management and automatic tracking,” says Rao. “The predictable, easily managed model in Creative Cloud for teams allows us to budget for software purchases accordingly and grow as our team grows.”

Read the Prestige Group case study.

1:31 PM Permalink

Creative Cloud Tutorials: Better Than Ever

On June 18 2014, at a Creative Cloud launch event, Adobe introduced exciting new features to the applications in Creative Cloud, a newly reimagined Adobe.com, and hundreds of new Creative Cloud tutorials.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

I want to share with you the new design for Adobe.com and its integration with Creative Cloud’s Learn, Help and Support content, which is now accessible from any of the product pages, or from the Learn and Support landing page.

Hundreds of tutorials

A big focus of this redesign  was to make it much easier for everyone to find and access learn content. Another important focus was to provide richer content. The larger variety of learn content now includes single video overviews, multi-video step-by-step processes and longer project-based articles.

As much as possible, the Creative Cloud Learn team worked to provide content aimed at encouraging Creative Cloud members to get their hands on the products and try the new features and workflows themselves; the ability to download project files makes it easy to jump in quickly and start building solutions of your own.

From the home page

The menu sandwich icon appears on every page of Adobe.com and provides links to all of the Creative Cloud products as well as Learn & Support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

All product home pages can be accessed from the main page by clicking on the icon for any of the featured products or the All Products button. Learning opportunities are widely integrated throughout Adobe.com and some, such as the updated Live Design feature for Adobe Dreamweaver CC, have a feature preview that can be viewed from the main product page.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver's marquee image.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver’s marquee image.

Anywhere you see a See How It Works link, you can click it to get a new or updated tutorial to begin working with that feature. The See How It Works link on the Dreamweaver CC product page marquee image takes you to an in-depth, hands-on tutorial from which you can download the project files and begin working with the new feature.

Scrolling down from the marquee image reveals links to the next four new/popular product features from the current release and access to corresponding tutorials. Below each image is a See How It Works link.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

From the product pages

Click Learn and Support from any of the pages on Adobe.com. Dig deeper by going to the Learn and Support landing page to get access to all of the Learning, help and support content for the Creative Cloud products.

Each product's Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Each product’s Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Content tiles across the top provide access to the primary learning content for each of the learn categories as well as direct access to that product’s online help. Click the Show All tutorials link to reveal the navigation section to access all of the learn tutorials and click Hide All Tutorials to save space.

A variety of Learn content types

Creative Cloud Learn content now comes in a wider variety of content types:

Project-based tutorials
We’ve added a lot more in the way of project-based videos with downloadable project files so members can try the steps on their own. For example, the tutorials for Dreamweaver’s new and updated Live View, CSS Designer, Element Quick View, Modern Platform Support, Integration with Edge Animate, all now have project-based tutorials with project files. (Downloadable project files are accessible  by clicking the Get Files button in the What do I need? section at the top of the tutorial.)

Access a tutorial's project files and product cheat sheet.

Access a tutorial’s project files and product cheat sheet.

Single-video tutorials
Single-video tutorials, such as What Is Dreamweaver, demonstrate specific concepts or features. Just click the Play button directly in the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Multi-video tutorials
Multiple-video tutorials, such as How to Make and Style A Web Page in Dreamweaver, break a project down into logical steps. Many of these have project files that you can download and follow along with the presenter.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

In-app learning
Learn content is also available within the products themselves. Each product has an in-app feature tour and new feature videos—available from the Welcome screen and Help menus. In-app feature tours provide an animated overview of the new features along with videos introducing the new features and how they work.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

Project Hello in Adobe Illustrator CC and Adobe Muse CC

Project Hello, launched in Illustrator CC and Muse CC, delivers personalized learning content directly within the application. Keep checking these for new and useful content.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Leave feedback

Whether it’s something you like or some way we can improve our Learn content, we want to know… Each product tutorial has a feedback link at the bottom. Let us know what you think.

Enjoy learning!

I’m very excited about the new Learn offering available in conjunction with the Creative Cloud 2014 launch: Not only do the designs of the marquee images and tutorial assets, by our talented design team, really show the potential of what can be done with the Creative Cloud products but the content is richer than ever before, and the variety of tutorials will definitely appeal to a range of learning styles.

2:05 PM Permalink