Adobe Systems Incorporated

Designing Tomorrow’s Cycling Trends

Market-leading bicycle distributor, Accell North America, improves collaboration with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

DesignCycling_1Bicycling has surged in popularity in the United States. According to a report from the US Census Bureau, the number of Americans biking to work jumped by about 60% between 2000 and 2014. Accell Group, widely known as one of the strongest players in the mid-range and high-end segments, serves the fast-growing bicycle market. After acquiring well-known brands such as Raleigh and Seattle Bike Supply, Accell North America serves the North American market with fun and functional bicycles, bike parts, and accessories.

“At Accell, we’re always drawing inspiration from the latest trends,” says Josh Podolske, associate art director and designer at Accell North America. “We try to predict what customers will be looking for in the upcoming months or year. That means we need to stay ahead with the most cutting-edge software and technologies to support our designs.”

DesignCycling_2 Designing for a fashionable market
Since the merger, designers for the Seattle Bike Supply and Raleigh brands have worked closely from their respective offices in the United States using Adobe creative tools to produce professional designs. The brands’ colorful bike, helmet, and glove designs are redesigned regularly in Adobe Illustrator CC to reflect current fashion trends and capture customers’ attention.

In addition to product designs, the designers also create the catalogs and flyers that provide vendors with clear and accurate product information. For the most complicated document, a 150-page parts and accessory catalog, character and paragraph styles in Adobe InDesign CC go a long way to improve consistency and designers can easily import assets from other Adobe apps, such as photographs edited in Adobe Photoshop CC or graphics created in Illustrator CC.

To consistently create high-quality content, the designers share and reuse brand logo and product images throughout their designs.

“Before we merged companies, Seattle Bike Supply worked on a private server while Raleigh worked with Egnyte cloud sharing services,” explained Podolske. “The IT department for Accell operates out of Holland, so it’s not easy for IT to just pop over when we need them.”

Rather than consolidating, Accell kept each brand on its own design server. Although the separation didn’t affect most daily design tasks, inefficiencies occurred when trying to share assets. If a designer for Seattle Bike Supply needed a brand logo on Raleigh’s servers, the designer needed to request the file from a colleague. As a result, designers could spend a lot of time waiting for a response—time that could be better spent adjusting artwork or layout.

In addition, designers from the two brands had previously worked with slightly different versions of Adobe Creative Suite. After the merger, it made sense for everyone to be on the same version of Adobe tools to improve their ability to collaborate across the team.

Connecting through Creative Cloud Libraries
While the designers continue to work on separate servers, brand assets are shared through libraries accessible through Creative Cloud for teams. Designers can quickly search for assets they need, easily bring those assets into projects, and continue work. The result is greater brand consistency and productivity.

“Adobe Creative Cloud Libraries saved the day by helping us work around our file-sharing challenges,” says Podolske. “We share color palettes or campaign graphics for more consistency across projects. It’s a wonderful alternative to integrating our servers, but without needing to invest resources in a server migration.”

DesignCycling_3Inspiring the latest trends
The Accell designers are constantly looking around for inspiration and trends that will influence their next product designs. “We never know what will inspire us,” says Podolske. “A billboard may use colors that would look great on a bike. A graphic on someone’s bag could be transformed into a cool pattern on a helmet. We’re used to finding inspiration on the go and working with our phones to capture that inspiration.”

The Adobe Creative Cloud mobile apps tie work done on smartphones directly into the creative workflow. When working on a new glove, a designer might start out with a physical sketch. Rather than scanning the sketch and trying to recreate the shape in Illustrator CC, the designer can simply take a picture; Adobe Shape CC turns the sketch into a vector image and uploads it to Creative Cloud Libraries.

To achieve a unique, organic design on a glove, designers may use Adobe Brush CC on a found shape or fun sketch, turning a picture into a custom brush in seconds. For the final step, Adobe Color CC turns a photograph into a fashionable color palette.

DesignCycling_4“When I’m out on the street, I can use Creative Cloud mobile apps like Adobe Color to take pictures that inspire me and have the palette waiting for me when I get back to work,” says Podolske. “We even use Adobe Color to instantly identify colors from our manufacturers’ swatch books. It saves us a ton of time that we used to spend physically comparing colors.”

With Adobe Creative Cloud mobile apps, designers no longer need access to bulky scanners. A picture from a smartphone automatically turns photographs into usable assets.

A recipe for success
Accell North America designers love the frequent software updates through Adobe Creative Cloud for teams and  take advantage of it to experiment with software. Rather than relying on outside resources, designers try editing video themselves with Adobe Premiere Pro CC, or redesigning the website with Adobe Muse CC. “Adobe Creative Cloud apps all use similar interfaces, which makes it easy to pick up new software,” says Podolske. “With access to all of the apps in Adobe Creative Cloud, we’re expanding our skillsets and bringing more creative work in-house, making better use of company resources and expertise.”

Adobe Creative Cloud for teams also helps Accell’s remote IT team in Holland manage software halfway around the world. It now spends 50% less time managing licenses and eliminated the need to store software serial numbers. “With Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, we’re collaborating easier and working more efficiently as designers,” says Podolske. “I don’t have to wait for IT to enable certain software. I can just download and update what I need in Creative Cloud. The smooth workflow helps us concentrate on shaping our ideas into great designs that reach a growing audience for cool biking gear.”

 
Read the Accell North America case study.

7:36 AM Comments (0) Permalink

A Cultural Icon, A Centennial Celebration, An Emerging Illustrator

The signature curves of Coca-Cola’s iconic bottle were introduced November 16, 1915. That centennial milestone is being marked with a year-long celebration and a global campaign. And nascent Belgian illustrator Bert Dries is taking part.

CulturalIcon_3When Coca-Cola calls
The assignment came by email. It was Coca-Cola Belgium asking if he’d take part in an art exhibition for which every piece would incorporate the unmistakable bottle as the primary subject. Soon after, client and illustrator met; but the meeting was little more than a formality: “There wasn’t a lot to discuss because they were giving me carte blanche.

They did, however, talk about the details of the partnership. Part exhibition and part celebration, Bert’s participation would also include live drawing (at an expo at Coca-Cola headquarters) with a permanent marker on a six-foot-tall, whited-out replica of the iconic bottle, and a workshop demonstrating his design/illustration process using Adobe Illustrator CC.

By the end of the meeting, they’d asked him to create three pieces. An assignment Bert took on more like a personal art project.

CulturalIcon_1The color(s) of artistic freedom
Consisting primarily of “These are the colors we use. Create some art for us.” the creative brief was, to state the obvious, brief.

Bert got busy thinking in red, white, and black: “I did make some initial sketches, but after sending them, I went in a completely different direction. So, in the end, they weren’t even a representation of the final art.”

But Coca-Cola Belgium liked them. And the works were printed. And hung at the expo (along with the work of other artists/designers). Interestingly, Bert’s first piece was printed incorrectly serendipitously giving it a pink hue and a pop art vibe that capture the bottle’s pop culture status.

About that six-foot high bottle? It was sent to Bert a few days before the event so he could take some time to consider its dimension. Not wanting a fully-fleshed-out idea, he composed just a general outline of what he wanted to draw: “I made a few lines ahead of time, but once I got there, there were people watching and asking questions and I just drew.”

CulturalIcon_4CulturalIcon_2That same audience, interested in his process, participated in the creation of Bert’s fourth piece when, armed with nothing more than a blank canvas in Illustrator CC, he asked the audience what they wanted to see him create. They made suggestions. He designed. They asked questions. He explained. And so it went until the illustration was complete.

A stark white bottle and a blank canvas
In the end, the four-piece assignment was much more of an art exercise for Bert: “Usually when you work for a big client they provide a lot of direction and have a lot of concrete ideas; but this time I had a lot of freedom.”

Not a bad way to help kick-off a year-long party.
 
Read Adobe Inspire’s “In Pursuit of Passion” to learn more about the burgeoning career of Bert (aka Musketon) Dries.

11:19 AM Comments (0) Permalink

What’s New in Creative Cloud Learn

Some curated highlights of new tutorials released by the Creative Cloud Learn team in March and April 2015:
 
CCLearn_ 1_ AcrobatAdobe Acrobat DC

  • Learn about the new features in Acrobat DC that help make it easy to work with PDFs and other documents—from anywhere.
  • See how the all-new Acrobat Tool Center assists with finding the right tool and completing almost any task with PDFs.



CCLearn_2_LightroomAdobe Photoshop Lightroom CC 2015



CCLearn_3_CompCCAdobe Comp CC



CCLearn_4_NicoleAdobe Comp CC and Adobe InDesign CC



CCLearn_5_TimothyAdobe Shape CC and Adobe Illustrator CC



CCLearn_6_LibrariesAdobe Photoshop CC and Creative Cloud Libraries



See our library of Learn tutorials for Creative Cloud products at helpx.adobe.com/support.

7:22 AM Permalink

From Critique to Collaboration: The Creation of Adobe Comp CC

Scott Belsky and Khoi Vinh‘s friendship precedes Scott’s tenure at Adobe, so when Scott approached him with an invitation to collaborate, it didn’t take long for Khoi to accept. In fact, in some ways, the collaboration, between the co-founder of Behance and VP at Adobe and the former design director of the New York Times, seemed pre-destined.

Since its introduction, Khoi had been touting the merits of the iPad as a creative tool: “I’ve always seen it as a really capable piece of hardware that at the same time imposes some really wonderful constraints. When you’re using your finger to manipulate things, you lose a sort of fine-grained ability to ‘get things absolutely perfect.’ I’ve always looked at that as a benefit.” He didn’t know it at the time, but the iPad environment he felt so strongly about (the one that forces people to focus on concept rather than execution) would become the foundation for Adobe Comp CC.

But it wasn’t Khoi’s appreciation of the iPad, or the fact that he’d built an app called Mixel in 2011, that prompted Scott to call him in the fall of 2013. It was, instead, Khoi’s skepticism about Creative Cloud. Khoi summed up the reason for Scott’s call in a recent blog post: “The perception at that time was that a CC subscription was a scheme to allow Adobe to charge repeatedly for software that previously users could buy just once. That’s what he wanted to discuss.”

From that conversation, things moved quickly forward.

By the end of 2013, Khoi was working as a consultant to Adobe with principal product manager Will Eisley and director of design Eric Snowden on what would become Comp CC. Khoi remembers, “Adobe assigned prototyping engineer Renaun Erickson to the project and for a couple of months it was just the two of us trying to figure out the fundamentals of the app, its basic concepts, what was important, what wasn’t.”

Critique_1Their ideas began taking shape when they realized that the key to the app’s success would be enabling people to get what’s in their heads onto the screen as quickly as possible. It meant they needed a “drawing engine.” One that would enable people to draw, move things around, and resize them—with familiar touch-screen gestures. Khoi explained it like this: “With Comp CC, you don’t access a different tool to get a box or crop a picture or create a block of text; you draw a box with an X in it and get a picture object into which you can put an image and crop it, or you draw several horizontal lines to generate a block of text. It’s much more natural. It’s much faster. And, most importantly, it’s much different than working on desktop software.”

Critique_2They intentionally kept the build media agnostic and with a focus on brainstorming. The canvases are familiar, but they are blank; there are no tools for pagination or trapping ink, and no library of interface widgets or pulldown menus. Because it keeps the focus on rapid-fire iteration, it’s a welcoming tool for conceptualizing juxtapositions of type and image for any medium.

It wasn’t long before it was time to share the build with an audience.

When Khoi presented during Sneaks at Adobe MAX 2014, the application was about 60% done. He remembers, “Not all the gestures were in there, the history feature was still pretty fragile, and as far as exporting to the desktop apps, I think only InDesign CC worked at that time.”

By the end of 2014, however, Comp CC’s two most important features were in place.

The ability to export files to Adobe’s primary desktop design applications makes Comp CC a powerful addition to an ingrained workflow. Many mobile apps have great approaches to creative exploration, they’re just not as attuned to a designer’s needs. Khoi believes that’s Comp CC’s game-changing feature: “We put a lot of emphasis on building those bridges to Illustrator CC, InDesign CC and Photoshop CC; I’m willing to bet that the bridges we created, to what designers already use and what they’re comfortable with, will be really powerful for people.”

As for the history feature that saves every iteration of every layout… it’s the team’s acknowledgement that ideas flow continuously. People don’t come up with one idea, jot it down and move on to the next one. But since any need to “manage” brainstorming sessions runs counter to the course of creativity, the saved history relieves, entirely, the burden of worry about preserving concepts, while also giving people the ability to scroll back in time—maybe even to the point of rediscovery. (Note: The feature is demoed in Khoi’s Sneaks video beginning at 3:40) A similar history scrub feature, already in Adobe Photoshop Sketch and Adobe Illustrator Line, provided the perfect interface but Khoi mentioned a characteristic unique to Comp CC: “You can actually go back and mess around with something you worked on 20 minutes ago but then whatever you did between then and now is preserved (you won’t lose it just because you elaborated on something).”

That’s the condensed version of the Khoi Vinh-Adobe partnership and the launch of Comp CC.

Now that Comp CC is in the hands of the creative community, Khoi knows the collaboration isn’t over, “For it to succeed and for us to effect meaningful change to ingrained workflows, we have to listen to feedback and understand how people are using it.”

And about Khoi’s skepticism of Creative Cloud… it, ultimately, fell away: “It wasn’t until I collaborated on Comp CC that I truly understood why Adobe made this huge move to Creative Cloud. It’s not about ‘renting’ software that we used to buy; it’s about a connected ecosystem of tools that’s only possible with the cloud. I was won over to the strategy.”

9:04 AM Permalink

Marcus Thomas LLC, A Creative Union

An agency, with a long history of using Adobe creative software for all of its marketing and PR creative work, makes the move from Adobe Creative Suite to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

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Marcus Thomas LLC is the product of a union between two of Northeast Ohio’s oldest and largest independent advertising and public relations firms: Marcus Advertising, founded in Cleveland in 1946; and Ira Thomas Associates, founded in Youngstown in 1937. With decades of experience, Marcus Thomas recognized the importance of digital spaces early on and transformed into the fully integrated marketing agency it is today.

By upgrading to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, the agency simplifies licensing management while providing designers with access to a wider range of Adobe creative software.

“Our clients are on the latest software and it’s important that we are too. Working with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams keeps everyone on the same software version, from incoming interns to freelancers and clients,” says Amy Gressell, digital asset and creative systems manager at Marcus Thomas. “This eliminates the extra work that comes from constantly converting files and trying to manage multiple versions of software in house.”

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Opening doors to creativity

The Creative Cloud Packager also makes it easy for Gressell to package products and updates for designers depending on their software needs. For most of the active Creative Cloud for teams users at Marcus Thomas, Gressell delivers a standard package of applications including Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and Adobe InDesign CC. Those working with website design also use Adobe Flash Professional CC and Adobe Dreamweaver CC, while video editors work with Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

People don’t have time to learn something entirely new every time they want to use new software, so we appreciate the usability and consistency of the Adobe user interface across applications,” says Gressell. “Not only does it help our designers transition to new versions of software, but it also gives people a starting point when they want to experiment with other software.”

Marcus_3Web designers are starting to work with Adobe Muse CC to develop advanced website designs in a visual interface, while many designers have added Adobe Photoshop Lightroom to their workflows for its range of fast and simple photography editing features.

“We previously only offered a limited number of products to our design teams because it was too costly to buy separate full Creative Suite Master Collection licenses,” says Gressell. “The range of software in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams gives our designers a chance to experiment with new workflows to produce more creative work and meet our clients’ high standards.”

Read the Marcus Thomas LLC case study.

10:38 AM Permalink

Collaborate Using Creative Cloud Assets

At its heart, Creative Cloud is all about collaboration. It brings different creative professionals—designers, illustrators, video artists, web developers, and others—together and helps them work efficiently and spend more time being creative.

Collaboration_1

Sharing folders and Libraries; two primary ways to collaborate using Creative Cloud.

Collaborate with files

Real projects are seldom single files. Even the simplest project has multiple design assets: documents, fonts, graphics, illustrations, and so many more. Also, it seldom happens that you’re working in isolation. In the real world, you need to collaborate with other creatives, service providers, vendors, and, of course, customers.

Collaboration_2 You can use Creative Cloud Assets to collaborate on single files or a folder of files. All collaborators then have access to the actual files that they can view and work on. This collaboration greatly reduces the work of “zipping” files and folders and then having to keep track of the various versions. All collaborators synchronize these files on their computers; Creative Cloud for desktop app keeps all files in sync and makes sure that everyone has the latest and greatest copy.

Collaborate with Libraries

Creative Cloud Libraries are collections of creative assets and design elements that you can use across Adobe desktop and mobile applications. When you share a library, collaborators can contribute assets to it. Libraries are a great way of organizing team-level assets and artifacts, and maintaining consistency across large projects.

Once ready, you can share the library with other members of your team, so that everyone is using the same approved assets. Use Libraries to quickly transfer design assets across your team for use in a growing list of supported apps on both mobile and desktop. Your team can then work on projects whenever they feel inspired. You won’t have to worry about stray versions of assets and can rest assured that all deliverables adhere to and use the correct design elements.

Collaboration_3 You can invite someone to share files and Libraries using the Creative Cloud website or from within the Creative Cloud desktop applications that support this feature. At the time of writing this blog post, Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and Adobe InDesign CC are the Creative Cloud desktop apps that support library collaboration. In addition, you can access and use library assets from within several Adobe mobile apps. Collaborators are authenticated using their Adobe ID or Enterprise ID. If some collaborators don’t already have an Adobe ID, they’re given the opportunity to create one.

Useful resources

Looking for more information on collaboration in Creative Cloud? Check this list:

 

That’s our perspective on Creative Cloud collaboration; let us know how you’re using these features in your workflows.

7:46 AM Permalink

Adobe Comp CC, The Best Thing To Happen to Layout Ideation Since The Cocktail Napkin

The latest addition to our family of mobile apps is a powerful tool for visual thinking and a new connection between the mobile and desktop applications in Creative Cloud.

Announcing Adobe Comp CC, a free app for the iPad that enables the rapid creation of layout concepts for mobile, web, and print.

CompCC_1

The road to product launch

When we began adding connected mobile apps to Creative Cloud, we knew they would change the way people worked. We knew that enabling people to work (really work) away from their desks, capturing thoughts and ideas and concepts as they flew through their minds, that we could enhance the creative process.

Built on the Adobe Creative SDK, Comp CC couples intuitive iPad gestures, fonts from Typekit, and the personal assets stored in Creative Cloud Libraries to provide designers with the perfect mobile brainstorming and layout work surface. Then, with a single click, comps can be sent to Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, or Adobe Photoshop CC (where CC Libraries assets and fonts from Typekit are also synced) to fine-tune and finish the work. It’s this powerful connection back to the desktop, where designers do so much of their work, that makes Comp CC, and all of our mobile apps, so valuable.

The app made its first appearance at Adobe MAX in October 2014 when Khoi Vinh, former design director of the New York Times, revealed it, and his collaboration with Adobe, during the Project LayUp Sneak. He said of that collaboration, “The company’s deep expertise in creative software plus the comprehensive power of their Creative Cloud platform were essential to this product—only Adobe could have brought Comp CC to life.”

From brainstorm to layout

As energetic as sketching with pencil and paper, Comp CC, amps up the ideation phase of the design process. Then it enables designers to add polish to the quick-gesture comps with custom type and personal creative assets.

CompCC_4But the true beauty is in how those ideas, achieved rapid-fire no-holds-barred, are managed. No need to save ideas that may or may not make the cut. A single source file and a rich history feature mean that every iteration—that’s every single version of every single layout—is saved. No need to distinguish between creative genius and creative missteps; a quick drag of a few fingers left or right on the screen move through the file backward or forward in time, to view every comp.

What’s more, at any point it’s possible to pause. And export. Not just a .jpeg or .png, but an InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, or Photoshop CC file with live, native objects. So… Comp CC moves effortlessly between quick-sketching brainstorms on mobile, to our desktop application, to refined output. All without ever leaving Creative Cloud.

Scott Belsky, vice-president of products at Adobe sums up its power: “Comp CC takes advantage of the iPad’s advanced touch screen with an intuitive interface and makes the beginning of the design process integral to the finished result. Doing creative work on a mobile device is only useful if the results can be opened on the desktop, where the project can be perfected in a precise, professional-grade tool like InDesign or Photoshop.”

A family of connected apps

Comp CC joins Adobe’s family of Creative Cloud mobile apps: Adobe Illustrator Draw, Adobe Illustrator Line, Adobe Photoshop Sketch, Adobe Premiere Clip, Adobe Photoshop Mix, Adobe Shape CC, Adobe Brush CC, Adobe Color CC and Lightroom mobile for iPhone, iPad and Android.
 

Capture a layout wherever. Capture a layout whenever. Capture a layout now. Download Comp CC.

Adobe Creative Cloud. Where innovation is ongoing. Give it a try. It’s free.

9:01 AM Permalink

Aaron Draplin and The Collaborative Poster Project

Draplin_2

Aaron Draplin is joining Adobe at HOW Design Live.

And, in collaboration with Adobe and boutique printer Mama’s Sauce he’s also fronting Draplin in The Cloud—part commemorative poster design, part portrait of a new work process, and part collaborative art project—using Adobe Shape CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Draplin, along with Adobe evangelist Paul Trani will be presenting a lunchtime session titled Draplin Takes Mobile to Desktop about capturing shapes in Adobe Shape and taking them into Illustrator CC. He’ll also be presenting in the Adobe booth, a sort of reenactment of his design process.

He had a few things to say about this uniquely-challenging creative collaboration:

Draplin_1 From shape to design. We know you’ve used Adobe Shape a bit. Tell us how you see it fitting into your design process long term? I’ll sketch something and take a shot of it, let the thing show up in my Library, and will have vectors to refine. From paper to digital, a little quicker. Then I’ll grab that vector, lock it on the art board, and draw over it, refining the idea. It’s another fun way to capture an idea. But mainly, it eliminates steps for me. Instead of having to shoot it with my phone, load the shots to my machine, let the cloud grab it, and then place the shot? From four steps to one.

The assets for this poster will be a compilation of vector icons solicited and gathered from other people’s Adobe Shape CC captures. Tell us a bit about how you think that will work. The world’s moving faster and faster. I’m having to learn new ways of capturing my thoughts, based on what’s within an arm’s reach—paper, steamy shower glass, my desktop computer and, more and more, my phone. Using these new mobile apps, you can bridge that gap. Quick and clean. And I’m starting to rely on it in my process.

It will be fun to see stuff come flying in, out of my control. And then, making new out of it all. That randomness sounds fun. I’ll be at their mercy. Out of my element.

And about that… People on the Internet, whom you’ve never met, sending in submissions for you to design around; that’s a broad collaboration. Nothing can go wrong there, right? Not one thing. Ha! I mean, if it’s weird or mean or creepy, I reserve the right to hit the “delete” button. But for the most part, I anticipate the stuff being submitted with good spirit behind it. Let’s make something cool.
 

Mama’s Sauce: From Shape CC to Illustrator CC to screen print

This project wouldn’t have been possible without the participation of Mama’s Sauce, an incomparable boutique printer. Because their knowledge of hand-done print processes is profound, we dragged them into a conversation about this project and a larger one about vector-to-handmade printing:

When we said, “We want you to screen print a project that got its start on a smartphone with a mobile app,” did you want to run for the hills? No way. Screen print, letterpress, foil printing—they’ve all come a long way from painting on emulsion, moveable-type, hand carved blocks, chemical etching… you know, the historical processes of putting graphics in a form able of being printed on paper. While all of those are super viable still, each with their own purpose and/or aesthetic, these days, 100% of what we print in our shop comes from a digital or raster file. Considering that the average smartphone has more computing power than the spacecraft that brought us to the moon (you may want to fact check me), there isn’t much a phone can’t do these days. They’re certainly smart enough to produce vector and raster files. I mean, I do it all of the time with Adobe’s mobile apps. It’s crazy how I’m needing my computer less and less.

How do you feel about the concept now that you know a bit more about Adobe Shape and its integration with Illustrator CC? A light went off. I’m ashamed to admit it, but I didn’t realize that you could send files so easily right into our pre-press workflow. The idea of moving in that direction for receiving files is super appealing.

Talk a bit about how screen printing is the perfect complement to vector art and a digital process. It’s powerful when vector meets makers; and digital designers have embraced hand-made output in a big way. I don’t think anyone is forcing it either. It’s a natural fit. The more digital we get in our processes, the more people want to stay connected, not to fight progress, but to keep more options on the table. It’s happening in a multitude of ways too: People are scanning old wood type, exaggerating halftones in their designs, and creating aesthetics based on old production techniques that were once solely practical in nature. And when people wanted more out of the old presses, not just their type and halftone aesthetics, but rather the rest of their printing capabilities for their vector art… polymer plates came along. Modern plate-making for letterpress and modern film-making for screen print—these processes make old world printing the perfect complement for designers wanting to print work on a traditional press.

For anyone who might want to use a mobile-to-desktop-to-screen-print process, what’s most important for them to know?  Begin where you are. If you see something inspiring and want to know how it would look 1-color, how it would vectorize, you can snap a pic and see that nearly instantly. Gone are the days where you have to email yourself a file, drag to the desktop, open the asset and then get to work. You work can begin wherever.

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Cloud Life: Adobe x Mama’s Sauce x DDC x You

From almost 200 online submissions… Aaron’s commemorative collaborative poster. Printed by Mama’s Sauce, in a limited run of 1,000, it’s being handed out this week at HOW Design Live.

Not attending the conference? No worries. We’ve got it as a digital download.

And, one last thing: A huge THANKS to everyone who submitted a shape.


Check our microsite to see what else Adobe’s got going on at HOW Design Live.

9:03 AM Permalink

A Small(er)-Screen(s) Version of Adobe Illustrator Draw

Optimized for the large (and larger) screens of the iPhone 6 (and 6 Plus) Adobe Illustrator Draw for iPhone works on any iPhone running iOS 7.1 or later.

iPhoneDraw_1

Yep, that’s right. Adobe’s popular freeform vector drawing iPad app, is now available in an iPhone version. And it’s in the iTunes App Store… along with an update for Adobe Illustrator Draw for iPad (more on that further down).

Different. But the same.

This initial release of Draw for iPhone differs from Draw for iPad in only two (minor) ways: There’s no stylus or Touch Slide support and no integration with Adobe Shape CC. Other than that, Draw for iPhone consists of the same vector drawing tools and controls organized in the same UI as Draw for iPad. Which means, a whole long list of features:
iPhoneDraw_2

  • Five expressive vector pens and an eraser.
  • The ability to customize drawing tools for opacity, size, and color.
  • One photo layer and up to ten drawing layers for each drawing.
  • Layer controls with the ability to duplicate, merge, flip and scale, and define layer opacity.
  • Up to 6400% zoom for finessing details.
  • The ability to send drawings as vectors to Adobe Illustrator CC, or incorporate them into designs in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator CC.

And, because we’re trying to keep this short, that’s not even a complete feature list. Get the whole story about Draw for iPhone by giving our pocket-sized drawing app a try: Download it free from the iTunes App Store.

Or, stick with the big(ger) screen.

If the iPhone provides what seems a scant drawing surface, there’s still Adobe Draw for iPad. And, although it may be hard to believe, we’ve made it even better with the inclusion of an often-requested feature: an Eyedropper to quickly and accurately sample colors.

We’ve also added support for Pencil by FiftyThree and Wacom’s Intuous Creative Stylus for iPad, (along with Adobe Ink and Adonit Jot Touch). And, now, not only are drawings automatically saved to the Projects folder (so even work you’re-not-yet-sure-you-care-about can’t be lost) but now that there’s also Draw for iPhone, drawings will automatically sync between the two devices when someone is using both versions of the app.

Get the update in the iTunes App Store and get drawing with a better-than-ever version of Adobe Draw for iPad.

And what about Adobe Ideas?

Been using Adobe Ideas and worried about getting projects out of that app and into Adobe Draw? Don’t. Import all of them or bring in just a few: Included in both the Draw for iPad update and the Draw for iPhone release is the ability to do a speedy batch import of existing Adobe Ideas files saved to Creative Cloud.
 

Our mobile apps are even better with a Creative Cloud membership. Haven’t tried it yet? Give it a trial. Free.

10:19 AM Permalink

Nature’s Path Organic Foods: Healthy Food, Impactful Packaging

This leading maker of organic foods supports consistent creative by implementing Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

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Nature’s Path Organic Foods is the largest independent manufacturer of organic breakfast and snack foods in North America. Making tasty organic, sustainable food is the family-run company’s passion. The Nature’s Path team loves finding new superfoods and developing delicious, new recipes that pair healthy eating with social responsibility.

Making delicious organic food allows Nature’s Path to take care of people and the planet. In everything they do, from sourcing ingredients to designing packaging, the Nature’s Path team strives to leave the earth better than they found it. The company’s design team supports that mission by doing what they can to make the packaging as environmentally friendly as possible.

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Worldwide brand consistency

Highlighting the company’s drive and commitment, Nature’s Path offers hundreds of products for sale in more than 40 countries. For the in-house graphics team, this translates to the need to create a wide range of packaging designs that are fresh and eye-catching, while conveying a consistent brand worldwide.

“We work closely with each other and our vendors to develop packaging we’re proud of,” says Jeff Deweerd, creative team lead at Nature’s Path. “We’re always sending files back and forth, which means that standardizing on the latest and greatest design software with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams streamlines workflows and reduces incompatibility issues.”

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Time well spent

With Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, the graphics team at Nature’s Path gains access to all of the creative software it needs.

Printed materials and artwork are designed using Adobe InDesign CC. Designers can easily bring in visuals from other Adobe software, such as photographs edited in Adobe Photoshop CC or logos developed in Adobe Illustrator CC to enhance designs. Designers also rely heavily on Illustrator CC for signage, promotional graphics, and flexographic packaging designs for plastic or metal wraps and pouches. And, everyone working on the same up-to-date versions of Adobe creative software means smoother collaboration, less time spent exporting and repackaging files, and more on developing ideas.
 

Read the Nature’s Path Organic Foods case study.

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