Adobe Systems Incorporated

Learn Something New: The Latest Creative Cloud Tutorials

Creative Cloud Learn has hundreds of tutorials that help members get started, grasp essentials, learn how to use new applications, and take full advantage of a Creative Cloud membership.

This week the Learn team’s new tutorial content focuses (primarily) on the new features in Adobe Muse CC and helping experienced video professionals make the switch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC:

Switch to Premiere Pro CC

LearnNew_1_PPro

Switch from Final Cut Pro. In this 20-minute tutorial, learn the simple XML workflow for exporting projects from Final Cut Pro and importing them into Premiere Pro CC.

Latest tips for quick video editing. Learn the latest workflow shortcuts, file performance enhancements, scrubbing tricks, and dozens of tips that improve and quicken the video editing experience in Premiere Pro CC.

Export a Digital Cinema Package. Learn how to export a Digital Cinema Package (DCP), an industry-standard collection of digital files, directly from the timeline in Premiere Pro CC.

Work with text in Adobe Muse

LearnNew_2_MuseCC

Add self-hosted web fonts. Because no one can ever have too many typefaces, Adobe Muse CC just made it easier to use the fonts you already own: In this five-minute video, learn to add web fonts, licensed and downloaded from font foundries or services, to your Adobe Muse font menu.

Bullets and number lists. In this four-minute video, learn how to use the new Bullet, Bullet Styles, and Glyphs panels to easily add great-looking customized bulleted and numbered lists to website designs.

And a couple of extras

Access Creative Cloud Market design assets. Learn how to access and use Creative Cloud Market’s treasure trove of vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and for-placement images in design and web development projects.

Make selections based on focus. A three-minute how-to about making selections based on depth-of-field using Photoshop CC’s time-saving Focus Mask feature.

9:59 AM Comments (2) Permalink

Creative Cloud Tutorials: Better Than Ever

On June 18 2014, at a Creative Cloud launch event, Adobe introduced exciting new features to the applications in Creative Cloud, a newly reimagined Adobe.com, and hundreds of new Creative Cloud tutorials.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

I want to share with you the new design for Adobe.com and its integration with Creative Cloud’s Learn, Help and Support content, which is now accessible from any of the product pages, or from the Learn and Support landing page.

Hundreds of tutorials

A big focus of this redesign  was to make it much easier for everyone to find and access learn content. Another important focus was to provide richer content. The larger variety of learn content now includes single video overviews, multi-video step-by-step processes and longer project-based articles.

As much as possible, the Creative Cloud Learn team worked to provide content aimed at encouraging Creative Cloud members to get their hands on the products and try the new features and workflows themselves; the ability to download project files makes it easy to jump in quickly and start building solutions of your own.

From the home page

The menu sandwich icon appears on every page of Adobe.com and provides links to all of the Creative Cloud products as well as Learn & Support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

All product home pages can be accessed from the main page by clicking on the icon for any of the featured products or the All Products button. Learning opportunities are widely integrated throughout Adobe.com and some, such as the updated Live Design feature for Adobe Dreamweaver CC, have a feature preview that can be viewed from the main product page.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver's marquee image.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver’s marquee image.

Anywhere you see a See How It Works link, you can click it to get a new or updated tutorial to begin working with that feature. The See How It Works link on the Dreamweaver CC product page marquee image takes you to an in-depth, hands-on tutorial from which you can download the project files and begin working with the new feature.

Scrolling down from the marquee image reveals links to the next four new/popular product features from the current release and access to corresponding tutorials. Below each image is a See How It Works link.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

From the product pages

Click Learn and Support from any of the pages on Adobe.com. Dig deeper by going to the Learn and Support landing page to get access to all of the Learning, help and support content for the Creative Cloud products.

Each product's Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Each product’s Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Content tiles across the top provide access to the primary learning content for each of the learn categories as well as direct access to that product’s online help. Click the Show All tutorials link to reveal the navigation section to access all of the learn tutorials and click Hide All Tutorials to save space.

A variety of Learn content types

Creative Cloud Learn content now comes in a wider variety of content types:

Project-based tutorials
We’ve added a lot more in the way of project-based videos with downloadable project files so members can try the steps on their own. For example, the tutorials for Dreamweaver’s new and updated Live View, CSS Designer, Element Quick View, Modern Platform Support, Integration with Edge Animate, all now have project-based tutorials with project files. (Downloadable project files are accessible  by clicking the Get Files button in the What do I need? section at the top of the tutorial.)

Access a tutorial's project files and product cheat sheet.

Access a tutorial’s project files and product cheat sheet.

Single-video tutorials
Single-video tutorials, such as What Is Dreamweaver, demonstrate specific concepts or features. Just click the Play button directly in the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Multi-video tutorials
Multiple-video tutorials, such as How to Make and Style A Web Page in Dreamweaver, break a project down into logical steps. Many of these have project files that you can download and follow along with the presenter.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

In-app learning
Learn content is also available within the products themselves. Each product has an in-app feature tour and new feature videos—available from the Welcome screen and Help menus. In-app feature tours provide an animated overview of the new features along with videos introducing the new features and how they work.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

Project Hello in Adobe Illustrator CC and Adobe Muse CC

Project Hello, launched in Illustrator CC and Muse CC, delivers personalized learning content directly within the application. Keep checking these for new and useful content.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Leave feedback

Whether it’s something you like or some way we can improve our Learn content, we want to know… Each product tutorial has a feedback link at the bottom. Let us know what you think.

Enjoy learning!

I’m very excited about the new Learn offering available in conjunction with the Creative Cloud 2014 launch: Not only do the designs of the marquee images and tutorial assets, by our talented design team, really show the potential of what can be done with the Creative Cloud products but the content is richer than ever before, and the variety of tutorials will definitely appeal to a range of learning styles.

2:05 PM Permalink

Illustrating Instruction: Tad Carpenter Creative

Tad_CCLogo

When the Creative Cloud Learn team decided to create in-app tutorial content for Creative Cloud members (a highly visual audience with equally high expectations), it knew that the accompanying imagery would have to be as compelling as the instruction.

The team turned toward its long-standing relationships with the designers, illustrators and artists who use Creative Cloud and asked a group of them to illustratively-interpret a handful of the features in Adobe’s applications—content that would tell the story of what was being taught but that would also stand on its own. They were staggered by the results. This five-part series is a close-up look at the artists and their approach to crafting this conceptual art:

First up is Tad Carpenter, a Kansas City, Missouri-based illustrator and designer who runs design and branding studio Tad Carpenter Creative.
Tad_Logo

Tell us a bit about your studio and what you love most about being in a creative profession.
I’ve been working professionally as a designer for ten years and opened the studio five years ago—with a focus on creating brand identities, packaging and illustrative-based design. We bring messages to life through smart, strong and honest work for a wide range of clients. What I love most about what we do: Our work is our play, and our play is our work.

Illustration often involves the conceptual interpretation of a concrete idea (a story, a product, an event); was it any different creating art to define a feature in an application?
No. I actually approached this project very much as an editorial-based job. I was given several feature topics and my job was to interpret them, in literal or abstract ways, in design form. It was a blast. Some of our concepts I think are easier to piece together with the topic and others take some thought…but that’s what made this project so fun.

Do you remember the art direction you received from the Learn team? Was it hands-off? Or hands-on?
Very hands off. They showed great trust in my ideas and overall concepts. They of course had input and ideas but ultimately they allowed me to paint the picture that supported their product.

Were you aware of the Creative Cloud Learn content before starting this project?
I’m embarrassed to say I wasn’t. But since working on it I’ve watched and read a lot of content in the Learn section. Adobe’s tools are so deep and keeping up with upgrades and additions can be difficult but Adobe’s made it easier than ever to learn new tricks and pick-up on things you’ve never used before.

What features were you commissioned to illustrate?
For Adobe Illustrator CC: New Document, Auto-trace and Resolution, and Arrowheads. For Adobe Muse CC: Master Pages, Hyperlinks, and Site Set-up.

Master Pages in Adobe Muse

Master Pages in Adobe Muse

Of the illustrations you created, which is your favorite? Why?
That’s a hard choice but I have to say the image for Master Pages in Adobe Muse. When I think about developing interactive content and how best to illustrate that, it starts to hurt my head: Designing a website entails creating an entirely new experience for someone, with the involvement of a lot of moving parts, structures, and collaborators all working toward one common goal. Looking at it that way, Adobe Muse starts to sound a little like a musical conductor… leading a group that’s working together to create one beautiful experience, but not just musicians create this experience… shapes, colors, abstract thought, ideas, are what it takes to build and make an interactive experience. It’s what designers and developers do everyday.


Hyperlinks in Adobe Muse

Hyperlinks in Adobe Muse

Of the topics you created illustrations for, which was the most problematic? How did you solve it?
For sure the Hyperlinks in Adobe Muse was the most difficult. My approach was to show a whimsical vehicle that takes people where they need to go. It’s a very literal approach to what a link actually does but the vehicle has lots of wires and buttons and a space-age look—as if it were traveling through tubes and wires inside a device.


Where does  your creative process begin? On paper? Or screen?
Every single project I work on starts out with pencil and paper. I start by creating a bunch of thumbnails. I move quickly with a bunch of scenarios for the illustration. I don’t worry about accuracy, or anything else for that matter, and focus purely on concept and idea generation. I then pick out a couple I think are the most successful and refine them as sketches.

Technically speaking I scan in my final pencil sketch and use that as a guide by placing it on a layer and using it as a guide to start creating my final piece. I include a lot of hand-painting textures, lines and splatters but make those separately based on the project and bring them into Illustrator CC.

Tad_6_SiteSetupMuse_S

In one word describe how you feel when staring at that blank canvas.
Anxious.

Do you feel like your art could change how people perceive the features in Creative Cloud and/or aid their interpretation of how to use them?
Ultimately what I hope is people see my interpretation of each CC feature and it inspires them to dig deeper into the content—either because they responded to my piece, hated my piece, or were just interested in the content. Regardless I hope my illustration intrigues users enough to keep learning about the features in Creative Cloud.

Did the Learn content entice you to try applications you’d never used before?
Absolutely. After watching and reading content in the Learn section I immediately began exploring and playing with applications I’d used before and others for the first time.

Spoiler Alert: Like reading the last page of a book, hearing how a movie ends, or learning the answer to a hard-to-solve puzzle… Tad was gracious enough to offer insight into the concepts behind his art:

New Document in Illustrator CC

New Document in Illustrator CC

New Document in Illustrator CC: I landed where I did because I like the concept that what we create takes over our worlds. I know when I start a new project it’s all I can think about. All the sketches, paint textures, and notes from meetings literally cover my desk. When we create a new file in Illustrator CC it takes over our world, seeping out of us and into the software. We are what we make.


Auto-tracing and Resolution in Illustrator CC

Auto-tracing and Resolution in Illustrator CC

Auto-trace and Resolution in Illustrator CC: When I was given this topic I immediately liked the idea of emphasizing the heightened resolution Illustrator CC now offers in auto-tracing. I very rarely use auto-trace but I do understand its purpose and how important resolution is to the people who use it. I wanted to show this in a simple manner. Showing how everything else might have looked one way but when using what Adobe now offers it can look so much better and different.


Arrowheads in Illustrator CC: Arrowheads are often forgotten in the large amount of tools Illustrator CC offers. Simple in nature they’re often used as accents. But arrowheads, and simple, strong, support shapes like them, can really bring creations to life. When I first started pencil sketching ideas, I really liked the idea of creating an image made entirely of arrowheads—not as a support players but as the stars. I love the mid-century feel a lot of the arrowhead shapes naturally have and wanted to play this idea up more in my color choices and overall layout. I drew some of the arrowheads but many of them are provided in Illustrator CC.


2:23 PM Permalink

Print 3D with Photoshop CC

PS_Learn

Modeling and printing 3D objects can seem like daunting tasks but in this new Adobe Learn tutorial, I’ll show you how Photoshop CC simplifies the process. Not only will it get  you into the exciting field of 3D design and printing but, best of all, you won’t even need your own 3D printer.

Watch three short videos, practice and print with the sample file included in the tutorial, and you’ll be designing and printing your own 3D objects in no time.

In the first video of the series, you’ll see how easy it is to convert a simple 2D pendant design into a 3D model, then customize the design to change the depth and size of the object for print.

In the second, I’ll walk you through the process of choosing different materials for your object and uploading your model from Photoshop CC to Shapeways.com, for printing; you’ll also learn how Adobe’s partnership with this 3D printing service makes it easy to upload and print 3D models and get lightning-fast delivery of your objects.

Once you’re ready to show off your designs, or get inspiration from other designers, watch the third video to learn how to share your 3D models on Behance or your own website.

Now… Grab the tutorial files and give it a try.

More tutorials from Adobe Learn.

7:52 AM Permalink

Keep Your Evenings Free in February

Because… It’s Creative Cloud Training Month at KelbyOne.

KO_843x403 (1)

With the breadth of digital tools available in Creative Cloud, our members have access to applications they’ve never used before… or never even thought to try. Maybe you’re a web designer interested in learning to use our pro video tools; maybe you’re an illustrator who finally wants to learn to use our digital imaging software; or maybe you just want to get the most out of Behance and Typekit.

No matter what you want to learn, or why you want to learn it, now’s the time to try the Adobe tools you’ve never tried before:

February is Creative Cloud Training Month at KelbyOne and they’re offering a different video course every weekday. Free.

The 30- to 90-minute courses will be available from 3:00pm to 6:00pm PST (6:00pm to 9:00pm EST and 11:00pm to 2:00am GMT). The courses are free to the general public for three hours and available on-demand to KelbyOne members.

So block off your weekday evenings in February. Then decide whether you’d like to learn more about Typekit, Illustrator CC and InDesign CC; Photoshop CC, Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC; or Behance, Muse CC and Camera Raw. And, finally, remember to head over to KelbyOne on Mondays to check on the courses for the week.

Week One

Monday February 3
Photoshop CC Basics for Photographers with Matt Kloskowski

Tuesday February 4
Illustrator CC Basics with Pete Collins

Wednesday February 5
Premiere Pro CC Basics with Brandon Ford

Thursday February 6
InDesign CC Basics with Terry White

Friday February 7
Adobe Typekit with Corey Barker

 

Week Two

Monday February 10
Getting Started with Acrobat CC with RC Concepcion

Tuesday February 11
Adobe After Effects CC Basics with Corey Barker

Wednesday February 12
Getting Started with Bridge CC with Mia McCormick

Thursday February 13
Illustrator CC: Beyond the Basics with Corey Barker

Friday February 14
Lightroom 5 Basics for Photographers with Matt Kloskowski

 

Week Three

Monday February 17
Premiere Pro CC for Photographers with Terry White

Tuesday February 18
The Essentials of Typography with Scott Kelby

Wednesday February 19
Getting Started with Audition CC with RC Concepcion

Thursday February 20
On Using Behance with Pete Collins

Friday February 21
Premiere Pro CC Beyond the Basics with Brandon Ford

 

Week Four

Monday February 24
Muse CC for Photographers with Terry White

Tuesday February 25
Camera Raw Basics with Scott Kelby

Wednesday February 26
Getting Started with Kuler with Pete Collins

Thursday February 27
Getting Started with Prelude CC with RC Concepcion

Friday February 28
Photoshop CC for Designers with Corey Barker

 

12:09 PM Permalink