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Adobe Creative Cloud Complete Plan—Pro Video Tools 40% Off

Save 40% on all the video tools you need with the Adobe Creative Cloud Complete plan.

Just US$29.99/month. Join now.

All video professionals worldwide—including Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, Grass Valley Edius and Adobe Creative Suite users—can get every Adobe creative tool for 40% off on the Creative Cloud Complete plan.
 
Join by May 29, 2015 and get your first year of membership for just US$29.99 a month*—a savings of 40%. Sign up now!

Creative Cloud brings together everything editors, filmmakers, animators, and motion graphics designers need to go from script to screen and beyond. Move projects seamlessly through your production pipeline thanks to deep integration between Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe Audition CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC. With apps that play well together, you can fine-tune your edits, audio, color grades, and masks in one integrated workflow. Plus, you always have instant access to new features as soon as they’re released, so you can stay up to speed on the latest innovations, industry developments, and new hardware and formats.

Making the move to Adobe Premiere Pro CC
Edit video with greater speed and precision with Premiere Pro CC, the industry-leading nonlinear editing application. Offering a clean, easily customizable interface and native support for a huge range of file formats, Premiere Pro CC lets you move through projects faster and deliver your best work, even on the tightest deadlines. There are so many reasons to upgrade or switch to Premiere Pro CC and now, through May 29, 2015, we’re adding one more! Our best offer yet saves you 40% on the Creative Cloud Complete plan. Sign up now!

When you subscribe to Creative Cloud today, you will get the new features as soon as they’re available. In Premiere Pro CC, you’ll get the Lumetri Color Panel, which allows editors to manipulate color and light with familiar Lightroom-style controls, Morph Cut, which removes unsightly jump-cuts in talking head interview footage, and Creative Cloud Libraries, which gives you access to your creative assets, including looks and graphics, wherever you are.

To see what else is coming soon to the video tools in Creative Cloud, check out our blog post.


Late Night with Seth Meyers
Dan Dome, associate director and lead editor for Late Night with Seth Meyers has a long history in late night television. Dome recently transitioned from leading the post helm at CONAN where they were formally cutting on Apple Final Cut Pro, to launch Late Night on Premiere Pro CC and a full Creative Cloud workflow. Check out how he and his team use Adobe Creative Cloud.

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Resources to help you make the switch
We’re dedicated to making sure you do not lose any hours learning a new piece of software. On our website, we’ve captured the tools you need to help you make the switch from Apple Final Cut Pro or Avid Media Composer to Adobe Premiere Pro CC. You can also download a free 30 day trial of Premiere Pro CC.
 
 
* Terms and Conditions: The $29.99/month offer for an annual Adobe Creative Cloud Complete Membership is only available to customers who own Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, Grass Valley Edius or customers who purchased an Adobe Creative Suite edition or individual product in one of the following versions (CS3.x, CS4, or CS5.x, or CS6) directly from the Adobe Store or by calling a regional Adobe Call Center. Offer valid for purchases of an annual plan, which requires a 12-month contract. These offers are not available to Education, OEM, or volume licensing customers. This offer is valid from April 9, 2015 12:01 a.m. ET through May 29, 2015 11:59 p.m. ET. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED OR RESTRICTED BY LAW. For a limited time stated in this promotion, eligible customers may purchase an annual membership to Adobe Creative Cloud for a reduced price. Residents of embargoed countries are not eligible. This offer is limited to one (1) purchase of one (1) Creative Cloud annual membership per customer. Offer is subject to U.S. export control laws and laws where the recipient resides. Offer may not be assigned, exchanged, sold, transferred, or combined with any other discount or offer, or redeemed for cash or other goods and services. Offer expires at the time stated in this promotion. This offer and prices are subject to change without notice.

8:09 AM Comments (0) Permalink

From Critique to Collaboration: The Creation of Adobe Comp CC

Scott Belsky and Khoi Vinh‘s friendship precedes Scott’s tenure at Adobe, so when Scott approached him with an invitation to collaborate, it didn’t take long for Khoi to accept. In fact, in some ways, the collaboration, between the co-founder of Behance and VP at Adobe and the former design director of the New York Times, seemed pre-destined.

Since its introduction, Khoi had been touting the merits of the iPad as a creative tool: “I’ve always seen it as a really capable piece of hardware that at the same time imposes some really wonderful constraints. When you’re using your finger to manipulate things, you lose a sort of fine-grained ability to ‘get things absolutely perfect.’ I’ve always looked at that as a benefit.” He didn’t know it at the time, but the iPad environment he felt so strongly about (the one that forces people to focus on concept rather than execution) would become the foundation for Adobe Comp CC.

But it wasn’t Khoi’s appreciation of the iPad, or the fact that he’d built an app called Mixel in 2011, that prompted Scott to call him in the fall of 2013. It was, instead, Khoi’s skepticism about Creative Cloud. Khoi summed up the reason for Scott’s call in a recent blog post: “The perception at that time was that a CC subscription was a scheme to allow Adobe to charge repeatedly for software that previously users could buy just once. That’s what he wanted to discuss.”

From that conversation, things moved quickly forward.

By the end of 2013, Khoi was working as a consultant to Adobe with principal product manager Will Eisley and director of design Eric Snowden on what would become Comp CC. Khoi remembers, “Adobe assigned prototyping engineer Renaun Erickson to the project and for a couple of months it was just the two of us trying to figure out the fundamentals of the app, its basic concepts, what was important, what wasn’t.”

Critique_1Their ideas began taking shape when they realized that the key to the app’s success would be enabling people to get what’s in their heads onto the screen as quickly as possible. It meant they needed a “drawing engine.” One that would enable people to draw, move things around, and resize them—with familiar touch-screen gestures. Khoi explained it like this: “With Comp CC, you don’t access a different tool to get a box or crop a picture or create a block of text; you draw a box with an X in it and get a picture object into which you can put an image and crop it, or you draw several horizontal lines to generate a block of text. It’s much more natural. It’s much faster. And, most importantly, it’s much different than working on desktop software.”

Critique_2They intentionally kept the build media agnostic and with a focus on brainstorming. The canvases are familiar, but they are blank; there are no tools for pagination or trapping ink, and no library of interface widgets or pulldown menus. Because it keeps the focus on rapid-fire iteration, it’s a welcoming tool for conceptualizing juxtapositions of type and image for any medium.

It wasn’t long before it was time to share the build with an audience.

When Khoi presented during Sneaks at Adobe MAX 2014, the application was about 60% done. He remembers, “Not all the gestures were in there, the history feature was still pretty fragile, and as far as exporting to the desktop apps, I think only InDesign CC worked at that time.”

By the end of 2014, however, Comp CC’s two most important features were in place.

The ability to export files to Adobe’s primary desktop design applications makes Comp CC a powerful addition to an ingrained workflow. Many mobile apps have great approaches to creative exploration, they’re just not as attuned to a designer’s needs. Khoi believes that’s Comp CC’s game-changing feature: “We put a lot of emphasis on building those bridges to Illustrator CC, InDesign CC and Photoshop CC; I’m willing to bet that the bridges we created, to what designers already use and what they’re comfortable with, will be really powerful for people.”

As for the history feature that saves every iteration of every layout… it’s the team’s acknowledgement that ideas flow continuously. People don’t come up with one idea, jot it down and move on to the next one. But since any need to “manage” brainstorming sessions runs counter to the course of creativity, the saved history relieves, entirely, the burden of worry about preserving concepts, while also giving people the ability to scroll back in time—maybe even to the point of rediscovery. (Note: The feature is demoed in Khoi’s Sneaks video beginning at 3:40) A similar history scrub feature, already in Adobe Photoshop Sketch and Adobe Illustrator Line, provided the perfect interface but Khoi mentioned a characteristic unique to Comp CC: “You can actually go back and mess around with something you worked on 20 minutes ago but then whatever you did between then and now is preserved (you won’t lose it just because you elaborated on something).”

That’s the condensed version of the Khoi Vinh-Adobe partnership and the launch of Comp CC.

Now that Comp CC is in the hands of the creative community, Khoi knows the collaboration isn’t over, “For it to succeed and for us to effect meaningful change to ingrained workflows, we have to listen to feedback and understand how people are using it.”

And about Khoi’s skepticism of Creative Cloud… it, ultimately, fell away: “It wasn’t until I collaborated on Comp CC that I truly understood why Adobe made this huge move to Creative Cloud. It’s not about ‘renting’ software that we used to buy; it’s about a connected ecosystem of tools that’s only possible with the cloud. I was won over to the strategy.”

9:04 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Announcing A Major New Update to The Creative Cloud Photography Plan

Starting today, with the release of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC 2015 and updates to all our mobile apps, the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography plan now, more than ever, makes it possible to enjoy your passion for photography anytime you want.

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With the Creative Cloud Photography plan, capture any moment and make it your own

Perfect your photography with Lightroom CC and Adobe Photoshop CC, the best photography tools whether you’re a beginner or a pro. Organize, edit, enhance and transform your photos anytime, anywhere. Sync your images across all your devices—Mac, PC and mobile. It’s all your photography, all in one place.
 

Lightroom CC

Lightroom CC is the standard for photo enthusiasts and professionals, and essential for perfecting photos. What’s new?

  • HDR Merge: Easily combine multiple high-contrast shots into a single HDR image.
  • Panorama Merge: Stitch together a group of photos to form a seamless panorama.
  • Facial Recognition: Identify a face in a photo and effortlessly find the same face in a library of images.
  • Performance Improvements: Get more done, faster. Lightroom takes advantage of compatible graphics processors to boost overall speed up to ten times faster, especially in the Develop module.
  • Filter Brush: Erase parts of a gradient or paint gradient effects into any part of a photo.
  • Advanced Video Slideshows: Combine still images, video and music with professional effects like pan and zoom.

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Lightroom for mobile devices

Automatically synced with Lightroom CC on the desktop, Adobe Lightroom for mobile lets you edit, organize and share photos on-the-go, on iOS and Android devices.

  • Android Tablet Support: Previously only available on Android phones, now you can sync, edit, organize and share on Android tablets too.
  • Android SD Card Support: You can now specify local storage to an SD card rather than internal device storage.
  • Native DNG Support on Android: Android 5.0 (aka “Lollipop”) now allows you to shoot photos in raw, and saves them as DNG files. You can now import those DNG files directly from you Android device.
  • Improved Crop Experience on iOS: We simplified the number of tiles in our crop UI so you can now easily find aspect ratios, and we added an auto-straighten function.

Sharing and storytelling

Stories are easy to tell with photos from any Lightroom collection using our free iPad apps Adobe Slate and Adobe Voice.
 

Read all the details about what’s new in Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan on the Photoshop.com and Lightroom Journal blogs.

The Creative Cloud Photography plan (USD$9.99 per month) includes Lightroom for your desktop, web and mobile, Photoshop CC and Photoshop Mix (for iPhone and iPad).

The products in the Creative Cloud Photography plan are also available as part of a Creative Cloud complete plan. Haven’t tried Creative Cloud yet? You should. For free.

9:25 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Collaborate Using Creative Cloud Assets

At its heart, Creative Cloud is all about collaboration. It brings different creative professionals—designers, illustrators, video artists, web developers, and others—together and helps them work efficiently and spend more time being creative.

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Sharing folders and Libraries; two primary ways to collaborate using Creative Cloud.

Collaborate with files

Real projects are seldom single files. Even the simplest project has multiple design assets: documents, fonts, graphics, illustrations, and so many more. Also, it seldom happens that you’re working in isolation. In the real world, you need to collaborate with other creatives, service providers, vendors, and, of course, customers.

Collaboration_2 You can use Creative Cloud Assets to collaborate on single files or a folder of files. All collaborators then have access to the actual files that they can view and work on. This collaboration greatly reduces the work of “zipping” files and folders and then having to keep track of the various versions. All collaborators synchronize these files on their computers; Creative Cloud for desktop app keeps all files in sync and makes sure that everyone has the latest and greatest copy.

Collaborate with Libraries

Creative Cloud Libraries are collections of creative assets and design elements that you can use across Adobe desktop and mobile applications. When you share a library, collaborators can contribute assets to it. Libraries are a great way of organizing team-level assets and artifacts, and maintaining consistency across large projects.

Once ready, you can share the library with other members of your team, so that everyone is using the same approved assets. Use Libraries to quickly transfer design assets across your team for use in a growing list of supported apps on both mobile and desktop. Your team can then work on projects whenever they feel inspired. You won’t have to worry about stray versions of assets and can rest assured that all deliverables adhere to and use the correct design elements.

Collaboration_3 You can invite someone to share files and Libraries using the Creative Cloud website or from within the Creative Cloud desktop applications that support this feature. At the time of writing this blog post, Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and Adobe InDesign CC are the Creative Cloud desktop apps that support library collaboration. In addition, you can access and use library assets from within several Adobe mobile apps. Collaborators are authenticated using their Adobe ID or Enterprise ID. If some collaborators don’t already have an Adobe ID, they’re given the opportunity to create one.

Useful resources

Looking for more information on collaboration in Creative Cloud? Check this list:

 

That’s our perspective on Creative Cloud collaboration; let us know how you’re using these features in your workflows.

7:46 AM Comments (0) Permalink

First Federal Savings Bank, Designing for The Future

A small, fast-growing bank builds an in-house creative group to create exceptional content with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

FirstFed_1 Century-old First Federal Savings Bank’s mission is to be the best bank in the seven-county Idaho region it serves by achieving excellence in everything it does. As a small, growing financial institution, outsourcing content production seemed like the natural choice. But the bank soon saw an opportunity to gain more control and boost efficiency by moving creative and design activities in house.

Producing content in house

Today, a small staff handles everything from designing brochures and billboards to producing radio and TV ads—with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams. “We knew that to build a successful in-house creative team, the creative software we used would have to keep pace with our growth,” says Cornelius Brackett, media specialist for First Federal Savings Bank.

FirstFed_2 Brackett, who previously worked in purchasing at the bank, but had a background in design and technology, created some ATM ads that resonated with customers. Soon, the bank was asking him to edit brochures and create newspaper ads. Brackett eventually found himself spending 20 hours a week creating marketing materials including a local television commercial. “Adobe is the standard for creative tools, so I knew it was a no-brainer to move to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams to meet our creative needs,” Bracket says. “Our print houses and video producer had already switched to Adobe Creative Cloud, and it was important to be compatible with our vendors to avoid potential workflow issues.”

Making the case for cloud

Currently, the team supports design needs for eleven branches, but soon, the bank expects to expand to other locations, and to enhance its marketing through online channels too. “We plan to do more online marketing, including an imminent website redesign,” says Brackett. Adobe Creative Cloud for teams will provide the flexibility to grow while managing costs predictably. “We can package the applications for different team members, so that we’re not wasting any Creative Cloud licenses.”

FirstFed_3The team uses Adobe After Effects CC and Adobe Premiere Pro CC to produce some videos such as television spots, and Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe InDesign CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC to create print materials. Brackett is also experimenting with Creative Cloud mobile apps, including Adobe Photoshop Mix and Adobe Color CC, which he used to grab palettes from a unique color scheme in a new bank building to create materials that visually fit into targeted environments.

With interoperability between all of the apps in Creative Cloud continuing to streamline workflows, Brackett can work non-destructively, modifying background imagery or other elements up to the last minute. “The workflows among the Creative Cloud applications constantly become more integrated,” says Brackett. “This makes both learning and working with the applications more efficient. It just makes my job easier.”

Expanding horizons

By bringing design in house and moving to the cloud, the bank is conserving funds previously spent on outside vendors. Adding to the cost benefits, access to a wide array of creative software is spurring new ideas and opportunities. “We’re already creating a variety of content, and we see endless possibilities to do even more,” says Brackett. “Adobe Creative Cloud for teams really fosters productivity and creativity. I love nothing more than downloading a new piece of software and playing with it to get the creative juices flowing. It’s fun for me personally, and it helps us cultivate fresh ideas that genuinely benefit the bank.”

Read the First Federal Savings Bank case study.

8:34 AM Permalink

Adobe Comp CC, The Best Thing To Happen to Layout Ideation Since The Cocktail Napkin

The latest addition to our family of mobile apps is a powerful tool for visual thinking and a new connection between the mobile and desktop applications in Creative Cloud.

Announcing Adobe Comp CC, a free app for the iPad that enables the rapid creation of layout concepts for mobile, web, and print.

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The road to product launch

When we began adding connected mobile apps to Creative Cloud, we knew they would change the way people worked. We knew that enabling people to work (really work) away from their desks, capturing thoughts and ideas and concepts as they flew through their minds, that we could enhance the creative process.

Built on the Adobe Creative SDK, Comp CC couples intuitive iPad gestures, fonts from Typekit, and the personal assets stored in Creative Cloud Libraries to provide designers with the perfect mobile brainstorming and layout work surface. Then, with a single click, comps can be sent to Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, or Adobe Photoshop CC (where CC Libraries assets and fonts from Typekit are also synced) to fine-tune and finish the work. It’s this powerful connection back to the desktop, where designers do so much of their work, that makes Comp CC, and all of our mobile apps, so valuable.

The app made its first appearance at Adobe MAX in October 2014 when Khoi Vinh, former design director of the New York Times, revealed it, and his collaboration with Adobe, during the Project LayUp Sneak. He said of that collaboration, “The company’s deep expertise in creative software plus the comprehensive power of their Creative Cloud platform were essential to this product—only Adobe could have brought Comp CC to life.”

From brainstorm to layout

As energetic as sketching with pencil and paper, Comp CC, amps up the ideation phase of the design process. Then it enables designers to add polish to the quick-gesture comps with custom type and personal creative assets.

CompCC_4But the true beauty is in how those ideas, achieved rapid-fire no-holds-barred, are managed. No need to save ideas that may or may not make the cut. A single source file and a rich history feature mean that every iteration—that’s every single version of every single layout—is saved. No need to distinguish between creative genius and creative missteps; a quick drag of a few fingers left or right on the screen move through the file backward or forward in time, to view every comp.

What’s more, at any point it’s possible to pause. And export. Not just a .jpeg or .png, but an InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, or Photoshop CC file with live, native objects. So… Comp CC moves effortlessly between quick-sketching brainstorms on mobile, to our desktop application, to refined output. All without ever leaving Creative Cloud.

Scott Belsky, vice-president of products at Adobe sums up its power: “Comp CC takes advantage of the iPad’s advanced touch screen with an intuitive interface and makes the beginning of the design process integral to the finished result. Doing creative work on a mobile device is only useful if the results can be opened on the desktop, where the project can be perfected in a precise, professional-grade tool like InDesign or Photoshop.”

A family of connected apps

Comp CC joins Adobe’s family of Creative Cloud mobile apps: Adobe Illustrator Draw, Adobe Illustrator Line, Adobe Photoshop Sketch, Adobe Premiere Clip, Adobe Photoshop Mix, Adobe Shape CC, Adobe Brush CC, Adobe Color CC and Lightroom mobile for iPhone, iPad and Android.
 

Capture a layout wherever. Capture a layout whenever. Capture a layout now. Download Comp CC.

Adobe Creative Cloud. Where innovation is ongoing. Give it a try. It’s free.

9:01 AM Permalink

HaZ Goes Hollywood with Sci-Fi Teasers

Turning proof-of-concept shorts into feature film deals with Adobe Creative Cloud.

HaZ_1Soon after its release, Project Kronos was an Internet hit on YouTube and Vimeo. Viewers loved the gritty documentary feel of the fifteen-minute short created on a budget of just £3000 by Hasraf “HaZ” Dulull entirely with Adobe Creative Cloud applications, including Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC. Hollywood loved it, too. So much so, that HaZ was able to win his first feature film deal for a full-length version of the space exploration drama.

Hollywood is a long way from the buzzing streets of central London where HaZ grew up. As a boy, his interest in cinema was first piqued by VHS videos of Blade Runner and Alien. Fascinated by the special effects, the youngster carefully reviewed scenes, trying to discern how they were created. Meanwhile in school he started playing around with an early version of the Paint application. “The school computers wouldn’t let you save files, so day after day I would create the same image, improving it as I went along,” he recalls. “I got pretty good at pushing pixels that way.”

At sixteen, he got his first computer and was soon a keen gamer. His interest in pursuing a career in game design led him to choose Computer Science, Technology, and Design for his A Level exam subjects. As part of his schoolwork, he created and animated a film using 4-bit images. From there HaZ went on to study media communications and for his dissertation on video games he created a simple horror game.

From game cinematics to cinema

That helped him land his first video game job creating cinematics, the short films that serve as introductions to video game narratives and as “cut scenes” between levels. “By now I was working with the first wave of digital tools, including Alias Wavefront for animation, Photoshop for painting, Combustion for compositing, and Avid for editing,” says HaZ.

HaZ_2_ProjectKronos

“After a few years, I asked myself: ‘Why am I doing this?’ Why not work on actual films,” he continues. “So I got my first film job at the Moving Picture Company in London.” Starting in 2003, he worked his way up from compositor to lead compositor, finally becoming VFX supervisor on broadcast series such as America: The Story of US (History Channel) and Planet Dinosaurs (BBC), both of which earned him award nominations in 2011.

As a VFX supervisor he was soon working shoulder to shoulder with directors. “That became my film school,” he says. “I was helping filmmakers plan their productions in a way that avoided problems in post-production. This didn’t just teach me about the process of filmmaking, it deepened my understanding of storytelling and how each aspect of a film, if done right, supports the larger narrative.”

The role of VFX supervisor is an interesting one and tells us a lot about the evolution of filmmaking today. Originally, the VFX supervisor was brought on set to bridge the gap between filming and post production. They ensured that shots were captured correctly for efficient post-production and high-quality visual effects. Sometimes VFX supervisors even directed segments themselves. But the role has grown as the place for visual effects in filmmaking has matured. “As a VFX supervisor, I’m working with writers actors, directors, producers, executives,” says HaZ. “We’ve become very influential in the storytelling process and we’re usually brought in now during development, before the script is even green lit.”

Pitching feature films in Hollywood

Meanwhile, HaZ himself was also evolving and the idea for Project Kronos was born. “Project Kronos was the right thing at the right time,” he explains. “Gravity was hitting theaters and Interstellar was in production. Space stories were hot.” Project Kronos was picked up by Armory Films and Benderspink to turn into a full-length drama with HaZ attached to write and direct. All of a sudden, he was being asked to pitch ideas for other films.

HaZ_3_ProjectKronos

“Now I go into the meetings as a director and a writer,” he says, “and I don’t just bring a script with storyboards. I cut a short teaser of the film to show the studio execs what the film will look like. And I’m not just showing them the story, I’m showing them how it can be made.”

The approach has worked. In short order HaZ had three films in development with a fourth in the works. “It really helps that I can knock out the videos fast,” he explains. “Once I even cut a pitch trailer on the plane, on the way to Los Angeles. It’s so easy now: boot up the laptop, open the Creative Cloud apps and just get to work.”

The process itself is not new to him, just the ease with which he can do it. “I’ve been doing proof of concept stuff for a long time, but it used to be with disconnected tools,” he says. “With Creative Cloud I don’t have to deal with that anymore. I just bring everything into Premiere Pro CC and then connect the pieces. It makes it so much easier to sell an idea when you can show it already visualized.”

Building pitch trailers with Creative Cloud

One of the new projects is called Sync. Unlike Project Kronos, which is styled like a documentary, Sync is a sci-fi thriller. “I wanted to show I could create the kinds of action films that studios are often looking for from young first-time filmmakers,” he says.

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He even created a kind of pre-teaser to show potential collaborators what he wanted to make, including grading with Adobe SpeedGrade CC, to create atmosphere, and VFX created in Photoshop CC and After Effects CC. “That worked,” he smiles. “My test shots generated interest and I found my crew and actors just by showing it around.”

While shooting the Sync teaser, HaZ and his team were already doing rough assembly, which was easy, since Premiere Pro CC supports the native files right out of the camera. From there the short film was built stem-to-stern in Creative Cloud. “Adobe isn’t just creating tools, they’re creating workflows,” says HaZ. He is proud of this project, which he feels includes elements of Blade Runner, one of his first movie loves.

I.R.I.S, a third feature film project, combines the documentary storytelling style of Project Kronos with the sci-fi thriller genre of Sync. In this story, the globe is surrounded by miniature drones which, using sophisticated artificial intelligence, monitor and police human activity.

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I.R.I.S. was created using the same workflow as Project Kronos and Sync. As with those shorts, HaZ made extensive use of After Effects CC for compositing CG elements into the live action, as well as augmenting stock footage. HaZ created I.R.I.S. before Sync but it was released afterwards. “It was a project I developed with another production company in Los Angeles to pitch as a feature film,” explains HaZ. “We never intended to release this one as a short film, but after all the buzz around Sync it made sense to make this public, too.

“I asked my DP on I.R.I.S. if he could find some guys who could help out as marines in the film. When I turned up on set these guys were fully kitted out with enough weaponry to start a small war—all replicas of course! They were awesome to work with and totally loved films like Aliens, so directing them was a blast. Naturally, I used them again on Sync for much bigger action scenes.”

A playground for developing ideas

As all of these short film projects show, Creative Cloud gives HaZ a digital playground for developing ideas. The result in each case is not just a story idea, but clear ideas for how to make it efficiently and cost-effectively. For example, HaZ has made extensive use of Adobe Audition CC to map out audio for his projects. “Sound studio time is really expensive, so it helps a lot if I can show exactly how I want the audio to be done, and the audio people end up using many of the original sound elements I created,” says HaZ. “And I’m not even an audio guy!”

The design tools have also proven useful in fleshing out concepts. “For one project I was asked how I thought it could be marketed, so I grabbed some stills and designed a poster for the film,” he says. “Typekit is a lifesaver for me, too—not just for making posters, but for titling and design elements within the films. I also used Creative Cloud Assets to create graphics in Sync. I don’t want to be thinking about tools when I’m doing my work. Everything I need I already have in Creative Cloud.”

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After a year of polishing the script, HaZ is now gearing up for his feature film directorial debut on Project Kronos, which will go into production in 2015. While this will bring new experiences, he feels very much at home in the process. “I don’t need to worry about post, or editorial, because I know I have all the tools to get the job done.
 

In case you missed it… from October 2013, Creating a Great Pitch Trailer for your Feature Film, an Ask A Pro session with HaZ Dullul.

(HaZ is represented by manager Scott Glassgold of IAM Entertainment.)

3:10 PM Permalink

3D Printing: What You See Is What You Get

The second installment of I Went to Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015… And all I brought back is a series of blog posts, the firsthand account of a first-time Adobe SXSW Creative Camp attendee.

Session 2: Moving from Graphic Design to 3D Object Design with Paul Trani

GraphicTo3D_1 Adobe evangelist Paul Trani is a designer. With an eagerness to exploit any technology he can get his hands on, he operates on the assumption that other designers feel similarly. Which is probably why he spent an hour showing a room full of design industry professionals how to make the jump to 3D printing with Adobe Photoshop CC—software that’s been in their creative arsenal all along.

The tools make it easy

Everyone in the creative industry has been called upon to function across design disciplines, to jump from technology to technology, to use programs and processes they’ve never used prior. Usually with built-in time constraints, those leaps require them to figure things out as they go and learn along the way. They manage, according one of Paul’s opening remarks, because “the fundamentals of design don’t really change it’s the technology behind them that changes.”

Therein lies the heart of his presentation: When it comes to 3D printing, designers don’t have to use unfamiliar software to get the job done.

Photo courtesy of Rachel Luxemburg.

Photo courtesy of Rachel Luxemburg.

A gateway to 3D

Adding 3D capabilities to Photoshop CC wasn’t an effort to rule the world of 3D (it will never replace 3ds Max or Cinema 4D Studio or Rhino3D); it was instead intended to help designers move from modeling to printing. To simplify bringing in files (.stl, .obj, .3ds) from other 3D programs, and to use for creative exploration: to look at something from all angles, move it around, create a light source, change its size, design its surface… then from there, print whatever’s on the screen.

Paul’s ultimate point was that Photoshop CC is an introduction. Designers wanting to get in on 3D printing, don’t have to feel overwhelmed by the process because the same software they’ve been using for years provides the fundamental features for effortlessly jumping in and out of it. It’s a platform for exploring the possibilities of 3D, without the headaches. And that’s more than enough.

My conclusion: Photoshop CC, with its fundamental features, and its familiar UI, make it the perfect gateway to 3D design and printing.

 
Read the wrap-up of Session 1: Revamping Adobe Photoshop CC for Screen Design with Zorana Gee and Charles Pearson

5:12 PM Permalink

I Went to Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015

…And all I brought back is a series of blog posts.

What follows is the firsthand account of a first-time Adobe SXSW Creative Camp attendee: Two days. Nine hour-long sessions.

Session 1: Revamping Adobe Photoshop CC for Screen Design with Zorana Gee and Charles Pearson

Photoshop CC project manager Zorana Gee opened with a brief evolution of Photoshop (and a reminder of its beginnings as a graphic design tool) then launched quickly into the industry trends that prompted Photoshop’s designers, product managers, a cultural anthropologist, and a team of designer advisors to begin the creation of Photoshop for Design.

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A return to the needs of designers

The Photoshop team gave anthropologist Charles Pearson an assignment that sounded simple enough: Hang out with young designers, see what they’re making, how they’re making it, and where they gather inspiration… essentially, figure out what makes them tick. Charles spent a boatload of time with design firms and designers learning how teams use Adobe’s best known software.

During hundreds of conversations, he confirmed that Photoshop is ubiquitous in design studios, but he also heard comments like: “Photoshop is not a concise tool for what I do,” “I only use 10% of what Photoshop has,” and “I need to focus on my design and there’s too much UI.” He actually discovered a disconnect between Adobe and these young designers—who felt like they didn’t really have a relationship with the company or its 25-year-old application.

From a negative comes a positive

The Photoshop CC team had some work to do. Not only did it need to continue its onslaught of innovation in the next build, it also needed to reconnect with the design community and build-out design features and workflows.

What began as the addition of features to address designer needs (one-click font resolution, link Smart Objects. layer comps, CC Libraries) has evolved to include a complete rethinking of the design features in Photoshop.

They call it Project Recess

The collaboration—between the Photoshop team and a group of designer advisors that first saw comps, then prototypes, and ultimately builds of the new version of the software—means that every major feature in the next major release of Photoshop will have been designed and developed using the insights garnered from a well-defined feedback system.

After Charles finished describing the genesis of Project Recess, Zorana previewed some of its features in an abbreviated version of her Adobe MAX Sneak (below) from late last year:


 

My conclusion: Designers, keep an eye out for the Project Recess release of Photoshop CC. It will be a gift.

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A Small(er)-Screen(s) Version of Adobe Illustrator Draw

Optimized for the large (and larger) screens of the iPhone 6 (and 6 Plus) Adobe Illustrator Draw for iPhone works on any iPhone running iOS 7.1 or later.

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Yep, that’s right. Adobe’s popular freeform vector drawing iPad app, is now available in an iPhone version. And it’s in the iTunes App Store… along with an update for Adobe Illustrator Draw for iPad (more on that further down).

Different. But the same.

This initial release of Draw for iPhone differs from Draw for iPad in only two (minor) ways: There’s no stylus or Touch Slide support and no integration with Adobe Shape CC. Other than that, Draw for iPhone consists of the same vector drawing tools and controls organized in the same UI as Draw for iPad. Which means, a whole long list of features:
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  • Five expressive vector pens and an eraser.
  • The ability to customize drawing tools for opacity, size, and color.
  • One photo layer and up to ten drawing layers for each drawing.
  • Layer controls with the ability to duplicate, merge, flip and scale, and define layer opacity.
  • Up to 6400% zoom for finessing details.
  • The ability to send drawings as vectors to Adobe Illustrator CC, or incorporate them into designs in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator CC.

And, because we’re trying to keep this short, that’s not even a complete feature list. Get the whole story about Draw for iPhone by giving our pocket-sized drawing app a try: Download it free from the iTunes App Store.

Or, stick with the big(ger) screen.

If the iPhone provides what seems a scant drawing surface, there’s still Adobe Draw for iPad. And, although it may be hard to believe, we’ve made it even better with the inclusion of an often-requested feature: an Eyedropper to quickly and accurately sample colors.

We’ve also added support for Pencil by FiftyThree and Wacom’s Intuous Creative Stylus for iPad, (along with Adobe Ink and Adonit Jot Touch). And, now, not only are drawings automatically saved to the Projects folder (so even work you’re-not-yet-sure-you-care-about can’t be lost) but now that there’s also Draw for iPhone, drawings will automatically sync between the two devices when someone is using both versions of the app.

Get the update in the iTunes App Store and get drawing with a better-than-ever version of Adobe Draw for iPad.

And what about Adobe Ideas?

Been using Adobe Ideas and worried about getting projects out of that app and into Adobe Draw? Don’t. Import all of them or bring in just a few: Included in both the Draw for iPad update and the Draw for iPhone release is the ability to do a speedy batch import of existing Adobe Ideas files saved to Creative Cloud.
 

Our mobile apps are even better with a Creative Cloud membership. Haven’t tried it yet? Give it a trial. Free.

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