Adobe Systems Incorporated

Premiere Clip Gives New Life to Personal Videos

Among all the new mobile apps and desktop product updates released on October 6, Adobe Premiere Clip stands out for me as a fun app that can be used to make something out of all the videos and photos you’ve already got on your iPhone or iPad—or both, actually, by syncing your project across devices and tapping into each device’s camera roll.

My editorial focus on the Creative Cloud Learn team is our digital video and audio tools. Until recently, I hadn’t seen any good mobile apps for making creative use of the videos and photos on my phone. There’s something compelling about making a movie soon after having shot some video at a family event or while traveling, and then sharing that edited movie with others or posting it to YouTube. Premiere Clip makes that task fun.

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Before Premiere Clip was launched at Adobe MAX 2014, I had recorded a couple of tutorials: Create and edit video with Premiere Clip and Refine a Premiere Clip video in Premiere Pro. For those demos, I went downtown (in San Francisco) and shot some relatively random videos of cable cars, which I then assembled into a movie using my iPhone and iPad. It was fun but somewhat familiar terrain for me. However, I recently used Premiere Clip “in the wild.”

While attending MAX, I went to a large outdoor party where there was lots of food, playfully interactive outlets for spontaneous creativity, and a concert by Kings of Leon. It occurred to me that I should record the event—and put Premiere Clip to the test.

I shot the following movie entirely with my iPhone 5 and edited it in Premiere Clip while flying back from Los Angeles. Before considering it ready for public consumption, I synced the project with my Creative Cloud profile and then imported it into Adobe Premiere Pro CC, where I did some minor trimming and audio adjusting.

Playing around with Premiere Clip is a lot of fun—and perhaps gives some meaning to all those times you hold up your phone and shoot something that seems important at the time but, you realize later, it’s too difficult to do anything with it.

Let me know in the tutorials’ feedback links what you think of Premiere Clip, and how you think it could help you with either personal, or professional, video projects.

11:52 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Square Enix: Worldwide Gaming Entertainment

Using Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise as its foundation, digital entertainment content provider Square Enix Co., Ltd brings fantastic stories to fans around the world.

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Creating unforgettable experiences

“Spread happiness across the globe by providing unforgettable experiences” is the corporate philosophy of Square Enix. Building on this philosophy, the company delivers high-quality entertainment and services to fans around the world.
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From classic game series including Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy to popular comic series FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST and Black Butler, Square Enix is home to countless hits. And Adobe’s creative software, including Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator CC, are part of the backbone upon which these creations are built.

Square Enix deployed Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise across its creative teams. Creative Cloud gives all development staff access to the latest creative applications and the Adobe Enterprise Term License Agreement (ETLA) helps the company improve software asset management and compliance.

Managing large-scale software licenses

Square Enix supports more than 2,000 employees in its Tokyo headquarters alone. The vast majority of those employees are involved with creative development; each developer has two to three high-performance computers, each with a wide range of necessary applications. Managing software licenses associated with each of those systems is a complex task.

“We want our developers to use the latest software to produce the best entertainment possible,” says Daishiro Okada, general manager at Square Enix. “But, when we took cost into consideration, we couldn’t always provide every employee with the most recent updates. As a result, employees were sometimes working with different software versions than their co-workers as well as on each of their own machines. Keeping track of all of this took an inordinate amount of time and effort.”

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Helping train new employees

To create fantastic entertainment, Square Enix developers need the skills to get the most out of the latest technologies. “We want to provide training on the latest technologies to help our employees improve their skills, regardless of the software version they are using,” says Okada. “And, ideally, we want to provide knowledge that applies to all of our employees.”

Complying with standards

Square Enix considers compliance with software usage regulations to be of utmost importance. “As a company that deals with the creation and distribution of digital content, we strongly recognize the importance of licensing and compliance,” says Okada. However, in an environment with multiple types of software and versions, eliminating unauthorized software usage can be a much more laborious task.

Reducing license management

Square Enix signed an ETLA for Adobe Creative Cloud to help improve the creative environment, simplify license management, and strengthen compliance. “Working with the Adobe enterprise agreement dramatically reduced the amount of work required for license management,” says Okada. “The ability to manage the licenses for all of our software centrally, without needing to pay attention to versions, has led to unbelievable administrative efficiencies.”

Square Enix developed an environment where users can download and install whatever software applications they need from an internal server. Only the agreed number of licenses can be issued, which greatly contributes to better compliance. The system also eliminates the need to connect to an external server, which reduces the risk of access to unauthorized copies.

Improving skills with free access

By deploying Adobe Creative Cloud, development staff can download the software that they need, when they need it, from the internal server. All creators, from experts to beginners, share the same cutting-edge environment. As a result, development teams can improve their creative skills while working to produce unique products and services.

“Most employees jumped into using Adobe Premiere Pro CC right away,” says Tomoyuki Hiraoka, KSK procurement supervisor in the general affairs department at Square Enix. “Many people wanted Premiere Pro CC, but we previously limited access to keep costs down; now everyone can have the applications they want through Creative Cloud.”

“Creating the best entertainment ultimately requires not only the best possible output, but also the best possible processes,” says Okada. “Using the latest technologies in Creative Cloud, we’re providing our developers an environment where they can quickly create brand new entertainment.”

Reducing annual costs

While analyzing the new licensing model, cost was a primary concern for Square Enix. Even if the new model improved licensing management, the efficiencies would not be worth it if costs also increased. The company examined costs from all angles, including initial purchasing and upgrade fees.

“Compared to our previous licensing model, we calculated that Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise reduces our costs by an amount equivalent to two full-time staff per year,” says Hiraoka. “The cost savings were a major factor in our decision to work with Creative Cloud.”

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Shifting the focus to online content

The video game market is changing rapidly, expanding from traditional home console games to an increasing number of mobile games played on smartphones and tablets. Square Enix is also focusing on development and delivery of online and social games played over networks.

“New types of devices will continue to enter the market, and we want to provide the best content and services for all of those devices,” says Okada. “Creative Cloud already has an established reputation for use in developing content on multiple devices and we believe that it will form a strong backbone for building our mobile services.”

Developing for the global stage

In addition to offices in Tokyo, London, and Los Angeles, Square Enix has additional creative studios in Montreal, Copenhagen, Shanghai, and San Francisco for a total of more than 3,500 development staff. The company plans to grow international operations in the future.

“Currently, each international office handles its operations independently, but we are looking to unify the development environment and management system on a global level,” says Okada. “We want to pull in top talent from not just Japan, but around the world, and provide them all with an excellent work environment. Expanding use of Adobe Creative Cloud globally would be ideal. If we can consolidate global license management, we will improve administrative efficiency and improve compliance even further.

Read the Square Enix case study.

10:16 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Introducing Adobe Premiere Clip

Ever felt intimidated by the prospect of putting together a video project? With Premiere Clip, Adobe wants to make video accessible to all creative professionals.

Adobe Premiere Clip is our brand new (and free!) app that lets you, in a few quick steps, turn clips and images from your iPhone or iPad into polished videos, and then share them with friends, family, clients, and the world at large. It’s a powerful tool for creative pros; and for established video pros, the app makes it easy to create edits on-the-go and draft a project for further refining in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Watch the Premiere Clip demo from the mobile apps keynote at Adobe MAX:
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With its simple editing workflow, it’s easy to work with assets  already on your device or those you have stored on Adobe Creative Cloud. You can also shoot new video from within Premiere Clip: Just grab clips and still images, drop them into the order you like, trim out the bits you don’t want. Set the mood by using one of the included music themes or by adding your own audio file.  Add cinema-quality color treatments to your video with a single tap. Adjust lighting or add slow motion effects and other finishing touches like fades or transitions.

Dave Werner’s Made With Clip video of Adobe MAX:

You can even work on your project across devices (starting on your your iPhone and then switching to your iPad, for example) thanks to automatic syncing of projects and media through your Creative Cloud Creative Profile.

Once you’ve completed a video, share it with your audience through social media, your website, or any number of other platforms.

Want to take a project further? Sending it to Premiere Pro CC is easy too. Through the app’s Edit in Premiere Pro sharing feature, send everything in your project as a group of files to the Creative Cloud Assets folder on your desktop. Once the files have been synced to your desktop, simply open the XML file with Adobe Premiere Pro, and open the sequence with the project name.

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Still not sure where to begin? Try one of our Reviewer’s Guides to help you get started. These guides breakdown some of the conventions of different types of videos and can kickstart your pre-production with pointers on creating a narrative and suggestions for shot composition. All you need to do is fill in your content.

What will you create with Premiere Clip? We can’t wait to see!  Include #MadeWithClip when sharing on social media. Check out the Community Videos page in the app for inspiration and publish your projects as “Public” for a chance to be featured. And, make sure to follow the Premiere Clip Twitter feed and blog for news, highlights, tips, and tricks.

Premiere Clip is available now in the iTunes App Store for most iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch devices with iOS 7 or later, including iPad 2 or later (mini and retina), iPhones 4S and later, and iPod Touch 5th generation and later. (Unsure of your device model? Check the model number on the back and consult Apple’s guide for iPads, iPhones, and iPods.)


Learn more about Premiere Clip
Download Premiere Clip from the App Store
Follow Premiere Clip on Twitter
Watch Meagan Keane’s demo and see what all the buzz is about

11:15 AM Comments (0) Permalink

New Features, and A Mobile App, for Creative Cloud’s Pro Video Tools

Updated desktop features, born from a collaboration with David Fincher’s Gone Girl team, and Adobe Premiere Clip, a new mobile app.

On Monday, at Adobe MAX 2014, the world’s leading creativity conference, Adobe announced the availability of new and updated free mobile apps, like the all-new Adobe Premiere Clip for iOS, and 2014.1 updates to Creative Cloud applications, including all of the video tools:

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC
Adobe After Effects CC
Adobe SpeedGrade CC
Adobe Prelude CC
Adobe Audition CC
Adobe Media Encoder CC
Adobe Story CC Plus
Adobe Anywhere

Adobe previewed the new video features at IBC 2014 last month. Key themes for the updates include: new project and media management capabilities, such as Search bins and Destination Publishing; support for cutting-edge technologies, like HiDPI Windows 8.1 displays and devices and read/write support for the GoPro CineForm intermediate codec; and more streamlined workflows, including Curves adjustments and a refined new Look workflow in SpeedGrade CC.

Introducing Adobe Premiere Clip

The MAX announcements also included the release of Adobe Premiere Clip, a brand new iOS app that makes it easy to turn footage on an iPhone or iPad into great-looking videos. The app allows users to edit and enhance video with professional looks, effects, and audio. Premiere Clip uses Creative Cloud to automatically sync projects between devices, so that users can shoot whenever they have an opportunity—and edit later when they have time. Users can also move Clip projects into Premiere Pro CC via their Creative Profile, which provides access to their rich desktop toolset.

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“With Premiere Clip we’re making editing a function that is always in your hands. Our goal is to bring the tools to the media,” explained Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “This allows people to ‘just do it’ and start making their own beautiful videos, completely on device, or to use it as a kind of sketchbook for video pros who want to rough out ideas to bring into Premiere Pro.”

Adobe Premiere Clip for iPhone and iPad is available as a free download in the iTunes App Store.

The Influence of Gone Girl

Coinciding with the recent theatrical release of Gone Girl—directed by David Fincher and edited on Premiere Pro CC by Kirk Baxter, ACE—the new updates include a number of features developed in collaboration with Team Fincher. These include larger features, like Multi-project workflows and Advanced Timeline search, workflow enhancements like EDL improvements and Render & Replace, and important details of the UI and workspace refinements, such as ripple label colors and definable marker colors, the way in- and out ranges are displayed.

In Gone Girl Rosamund Pike portrays Amy Dunne, whose mysterious disappearance turns her husband into a possible murder suspect.

“I believe this was the first major Hollywood film shot at 6K so the scope of the project was huge.” said Al Mooney, senior product manager. “We were working with an artistically-driven and incredibly technical team at the top of their game. It was an inspiring experience for us and we’re immensely proud to have been part of it.”

Fully 80 percent of Gone Girl ended up as some form of After Effects CC composition on the final Premiere Pro Timeline for the project. This gave rise to the request for the Render & Replace feature from Team Fincher. Render & Replace ensures fast playback of projects with lots of visual effects by substituting comps with rendered clips—without losing Dynamic Link integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects. “It’s exciting for us to be releasing features for all of our users that have evolved out of a collaboration with one of the best filmmakers in the business,” added Mooney.

 

Along with a significant update to Premiere Pro CC, all of the video tools received enhancements and new features with the 2014.1 release. For more information watch this overview video by Al Mooney.

To learn more about Adobe’s collaboration with David Fincher and his team on Gone Girl, read Gone Girl Marks Yet Another Milestone for Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Learn more about Adobe Premiere Clip and the rest of Adobe’s new and updated mobile apps.

Watch the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote and learn more about all of the great new fall releases.

Pricing and availability

Today’s updates to Creative Cloud are available to Creative Cloud members as part of their membership at no additional cost. To join Creative Cloud, special promotional pricing is available to customers who own Adobe Creative Suite 3 or later and membership plans are available for individuals, students, photographers, teams, educational institutions, government agencies and enterprises.

10:36 AM Permalink

Gone Girl Marks Yet Another Milestone for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

David Fincher crafts a thriller with a talented team of artists and Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

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If the first film review in Variety is any indication, Director David Fincher’s film adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestselling novel Gone Girl will be well worth the price of admission. Many filmgoers will see the movie because they like the actors, the genre, or because they’ve read the book. Many others will go because they love Fincher’s vigorous storytelling, his impeccable pacing, and his striking visual style.

Whether the audience is conscious of it or not, it is Fincher’s careful structuring of narrative and imagery that makes his films so powerful. Gone Girl is the first Hollywood feature-length film cut entirely in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Fincher is a director known for pushing technology to the edge. To help realize his ambitious vision for Gone Girl, he shot the film with a RED Dragon camera in 6K and assembled a top-notch post-production team. Two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter, ACE, edited the film with help from an editorial department that included Tyler Nelson, his long-time assistant editor. Peter Mavromates worked as post-production supervisor, while Jeff Brue of Open Drives was the post-production engineer. Fincher had worked with the group before, but the decision to use an integrated Adobe workflow with Adobe Premiere Pro CC at the hub, was a first for the tech-savvy director.

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After successfully cutting a Calvin Klein commercial with Premiere Pro CC, the team set out to determine what it would take to support the demands of a two-and-a-half hour feature film using the same Adobe workflow. Brue was tasked with designing the storage system that would enable Premiere Pro  to work smoothly within a demanding 6K production pipeline.

“Our goal was to get as many iterations as possible of the opticals and visual effects in a given period of time to make the story as strong as we could,” explains Brue. “The ask was for nothing less than perfection, which pushed us to do better. When it came down to it, Adobe Premiere Pro CC was faster than anything else in the market. That speed meant more iterations, more time to work on a shot, and more time to perfect an edit.”


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Having worked on previous Fincher projects, Mavromates comfortably assumed the role of managing the pipeline, helping determine the post-production goals, and guiding the visual effects work. With a plan in place, Baxter got started on the edit, working closely with Fincher and relying on Nelson and others on the editorial team to navigate the technicalities of working on such a cutting-edge pipeline.

“Working with the Adobe engineers was probably the best development experience I’ve ever had,” says Nelson. “Everybody was in tune with what was going on and we always had this amazingly collaborative environment. It wasn’t just about making our movie the best movie it could be, we wanted to make every movie cut on Premiere Pro in the future the best movie it could be.”

Fincher shot in 6K with multiple takes, giving the team plenty of material to work with. With a gift for bringing out the best in everyone on a project, it would be easy to assume that the film is comprised of only “perfect takes.” In fact, 80% of the shots were enhanced in some way, from reframing and stabilization to split-screening to remove an extra breath.

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The result, after a lot of meticulous detail work, is a film where every shot seems flawless. As the Variety review says, “…editor Kirk Baxter cuts the picture to within an inch of its life while still allowing individual scenes and the overall structure to breathe…”

“On every film we face the challenge of reducing the screen time without losing content,” says Baxter. “If we don’t have to cut out lines, but instead remove time from a scene by making invisible edits, that’s a win. The way David overshoots the frame in his films allows me to edit within the shot, then I throw it to the guys to sew together in After Effects, make it spotless, and stabilize the shot. That way David can judge the shots by the performance and delivery, rather than making comments on the technical aspects.”

Much of the visual effects work was done in-house, which allowed the team to work iteratively, in parallel with the editing. For example, Baxter could edit in Premiere Pro while others worked on shots in After Effects. The saved compositions would automatically update in Baxter’s timeline thanks to Adobe Dynamic Link. This integrated and interactive workflow kept shots looking cleaner and eliminated distracting back-and-forth discussions so the entire team could focus on the story as it took shape in the edit bay. This streamlined workflow was one of the main advantages for “Team Fincher.”

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“On Gone Girl we managed to do a huge number of effects shots, probably more than 200, in house thanks to the tight integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects,” says Mavromates. “I don’t think the average viewer will think of Gone Girl as a visual effects movie. However, when you look closely at David’s movies he is playing little visual tricks and we are doing brass polishing on a significant number of shots.”

This talented group of self-described perfectionists, supported by a gifted and driven post-production team, put the Adobe video workflow through its most rigorous use case to date with great success. Now, with the hard work behind them, they can sit back and watch their months of work unfold for theater audiences around the world.

Check the Adobe Premiere Pro blog next week for in-depth interviews with Kirk Baxter, Tyler Nelson, Peter Mavromates, and Jeff Brue about their work on Gone Girl.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud.

11:09 AM Permalink

IBC 2014: What’s Coming Next to Creative Cloud for Video

Streamline video workflows with industry-leading integration

This month at IBC 2014 in Amsterdam, Adobe will preview the updates coming soon to Creative Cloud’s pro video applications. In a fast-moving industry, video pros need tools that keep them ahead of the curve, allowing them to work confidently with the latest hardware and camera formats. With regular updates, Creative Cloud meets that need, making everyday tasks faster and easier—and opens new creative possibilities with a little more Adobe magic.

  • Powerful media and project management—Take control of large projects with new features like Search bins, Consolidate & Transcode, and Multi-project workflows in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.
  • Support for cutting-edge technologies—Focus on the content with a refreshed user-interface across all of the video applications, including HiDPI support for Windows 8.1 and Mac Retina displays.
  • Streamlined workflows—Complete everyday tasks more efficiently, thanks to new tools and refinements, such as Curve adjustments and hover preview Looks in Adobe SpeedGrade CC.

After a successful run using Premiere Pro CC to edit David Fincher’s upcoming thriller Gone Girl, two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter has made Premiere Pro CC the NLE of choice for his new company, EXILE. “I’m happy to see so many of the new features we asked Adobe for during Gone Girl in the upcoming release.” —Kirk Baxter, ACE

This post provides an overview of the upcoming video releases, including many of the top features and enhancements. For more in-depth information, visit the product blogs for Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe SpeedGrade CC, Adobe Prelude CC, Adobe Media Encoder CC, Adobe Audition CC, and Adobe Story Plus CC.

Updated user interface

All of the Creative Cloud video applications have been given gentle facelifts, using a more subtle color scheme and simplified UI elements.

“The first thing you’ll notice when you open them, is the cleaner look to all of the video apps,” said Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “We’ve modernized and simplified the user interface so that it doesn’t compete with the content. The point is to allow video pros to focus more on their content, and less on the widgets.”

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In addition to the UI refinements, the video apps have all been updated to work with HiDPI displays, including Mac OSX and Windows 8.1 devices. “We foresee a day when video professionals will be creating and interacting with their content in a variety of ways across a variety of devices. Our goal is to support this transition as it evolves and this UI refresh lays the foundation for that,” added Roberts.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC

New Search bins allow users to automatically generate dynamic bins based on search criteria, including new Advanced Timeline Search capabilities. Search bins update as new content is added to a project, so users can keep projects organized, even as new footage is still coming in.

Consolidate & Transcode allows users to move all relevant files in projects and sequences to reduce the overall project size. Once the setting is selected in the Project Manager panel, all content is rendered into a single codec and a compact new project file is created.

Multi-project workflows allow editors to bring everything they need into one workspace. Users can open multiple Media Browser panels for easy access to as many projects as needed. The new Source Monitor Timeline view opens a second Timeline for media and sequences from other projects, making it easy to bring existing clips, edits, transitions, or graphics directly into your current project.

Premiere Pro CC now offers full support for reading and encoding GoPro CineForm, an easily managed, cross-platform intermediate codec, ideal for high resolution footage. And the Premiere Pro CC engineers keep finding ways to get more out of the GPU with native support for 4K, 5K, 6K (and higher) content, including new GPU-based deBayering for AJA RAW, Canon RAW, and Phantom Cine, as well as RED and Cinema DNG footage.

Existing features see some significant new capabilities, too, like enhanced Masking & Tracking, that enables users to adjust feathering directly in the Program Monitor, or use the free-draw polygon tool to create complex mask shapes. Use Render & Replace to speed up performance of VFX-heavy sequences by flattening After Effects CC compositions into video clips—and thanks to Dynamic Link, the original comps are always accessible if you need to make further changes. Improved Master Clip effects, Send to Audition, and AAF export to DAWs, are just a few other enhancements coming to Premiere Pro CC this Fall.

“This is a packed release for Premiere Pro CC with some really nice additions to existing features, but our big focus here was on creating easier workflows for large projects,” said Al Mooney, product manager for Premiere Pro CC. “Consolidate & Transcode, for example, is perfect for facilities who need to trim down large projects. It makes it easy to pass work on to other teams, or to archive editable projects which are still reasonably-sized.”

Adobe After Effects CC

The next release of After Effects CC offers an enhanced Live 3D Pipeline, adding Cineware 2.0 and CINEMA 4D R16 compatibility, so that artists can work faster and more easily with 3D elements in their compositions. Broadcasters and large facilities that use Adobe Anywhere for video will benefit from improved Anywhere collaboration to streamline remote workflows with version tracking and project sharing. In addition, the new version offers a number of usability refinements, such as more visible anchor points on layers, tracking behavior improvements, and more incremental improvements that make motion graphics and visual effects work easier and more efficient.

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“We’re really excited about where we’re going with After Effects CC” said Steve Forde, principal product manager. “A special highlight of our 2014 releases is the deeper integration with Premiere Pro CC and Anywhere for video. This is a great example of how we are streamlining workflows for motion graphics and visual effects artists—and enabling collaboration between teams.

Adobe SpeedGrade CC

The next release of SpeedGrade CC is focused squarely on the creative tools, including a significantly enhanced Looks workflow, Curve adjustments and awesome new Grading Layer Grouping capabilities.

Working with Looks in SpeedGrade CC has never been easier: Hover to preview Looks in the main image Monitor, and click to apply. Looks can be dragged into the grading layer stack where they will immediately appear as a new Grading Layer Group, making it easy to combine existing Looks and LUTs; just adjust the opacity of each group to get the result you want and… Voila! A real “Look mixer.” It’s also possible to create your own Grading Layer Groups, or copy and paste selected grading layers to apply them to new clips or save as new Looks.

SpeedGrade CC now offers Curve adjustments, including RGB curves familiar to Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Lightroom users, as well as Hue & Saturation curves, which allow you to boost or mute parts of the color spectrum. Use Curve grading layers on their own or in tandem with the other SpeedGrade CC color correction tools.

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Improvements to existing features include audio support for Premiere Pro CC projects in Direct Link, faster tracking, better Autosave, improved performance with masks, and Enhanced Mercury Transmit, providing 4K output for 4K monitors and new support for Blackmagic video cards.

Adobe Prelude CC

Log metadata while an event is unfolding in front of you. Use keyboard shortcuts on your laptop together with your custom tags to prepare content efficiently—and without typos. Deliver media that gives your editor a running start for a faster turnaround in post-production. Add In and Out points more efficiently and apply transitions across clips in the Rough Cut timeline. Replace, or augment, camera audio with new support for multiple audio tracks.

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Adobe Media Encoder CC

Render and deliver your work in one fell swoop with Destination Publishing: Add preset options for FTP sites, or your Creative Cloud folder. Send to multiple locations and track rendering and upload in the same panel. With new Watch Folder support for projects, you can automate transcoding of all of your project files at once by dragging Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, or Final Cut Pro XML projects into Watch Folders. Mux during encode for faster rendering of MPEG2 files with audio. Extended Match Source support now includes QuickTime and DNxHD formats.

Adobe Audition CC

Open virtually any video format, including RED, XDCAM, MXF, and others. Video files now load faster and play more smoothly. Minimize background noises while amplifying and leveling speech with a powerful new Target Dynamic Range parameter providing even better volume leveling for spoken content. Read and add notes to audio files with iXML metadata support, including information such as Scene, Take, or time code formats.

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Adobe Story Plus CC

Screenwriters and writing teams can now Customize text boxes so that notes and comments stand out. Fine tune production planning and assign numbers to camera shots to align with scene order.

Adobe Anywhere

Adobe Anywhere for video adds robust collaboration support for After Effects CC users and brings refinements to the Adobe Anywhere app for iPad, including new scrubbing gestures and sorting options. A new streaming API allows facilities and broadcasters to integrate content from Adobe Anywhere into a variety of user experiences on the web or mobile devices.

“We’re excited to be showing another strong release at IBC 2014,” said Bill Roberts. “Constant refinements across all of our applications mean we’re always improving the tools, integration, and collaboration. The demands on video pros keep growing and our efforts are empowering our users to deliver better work, faster and more efficiently than ever.”

Availability

These updates to the Creative Cloud video apps and Adobe Anywhere for video are expected to be available in the coming weeks.

We’ll share even more amazing innovation coming to Creative Cloud—across desktop, mobile, services and community—at Adobe MAX, The Creativity Conference, October 4–8 in Los Angeles. To be among the first to know when these and other Creative Cloud updates are available, follow Creative Cloud on Twitter and Facebook.

Visit the Creative Cloud video page for links and news from Adobe at IBC 2014 from September 12–17. And if you can’t make it to IBC, please join us for a special, live from Amsterdam, Ask a Video Pro session on Friday, September 12 at 10:00am PT (7:00pm CEST) when Jason Levine will introduce the new features coming to the CC video apps.

12:01 AM Permalink

Learn Something New: The Latest Creative Cloud Tutorials

Creative Cloud Learn has hundreds of tutorials that help members get started, grasp essentials, learn how to use new applications, and take full advantage of a Creative Cloud membership.

This week the Learn team’s new tutorial content focuses (primarily) on the new features in Adobe Muse CC and helping experienced video professionals make the switch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC:

Switch to Premiere Pro CC

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Switch from Final Cut Pro. In this 20-minute tutorial, learn the simple XML workflow for exporting projects from Final Cut Pro and importing them into Premiere Pro CC.

Latest tips for quick video editing. Learn the latest workflow shortcuts, file performance enhancements, scrubbing tricks, and dozens of tips that improve and quicken the video editing experience in Premiere Pro CC.

Export a Digital Cinema Package. Learn how to export a Digital Cinema Package (DCP), an industry-standard collection of digital files, directly from the timeline in Premiere Pro CC.

Work with text in Adobe Muse

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Add self-hosted web fonts. Because no one can ever have too many typefaces, Adobe Muse CC just made it easier to use the fonts you already own: In this five-minute video, learn to add web fonts, licensed and downloaded from font foundries or services, to your Adobe Muse font menu.

Bullets and number lists. In this four-minute video, learn how to use the new Bullet, Bullet Styles, and Glyphs panels to easily add great-looking customized bulleted and numbered lists to website designs.

And a couple of extras

Access Creative Cloud Market design assets. Learn how to access and use Creative Cloud Market’s treasure trove of vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and for-placement images in design and web development projects.

Make selections based on focus. A three-minute how-to about making selections based on depth-of-field using Photoshop CC’s time-saving Focus Mask feature.

9:59 AM Permalink