Adobe Systems Incorporated

Marcus Thomas LLC, A Creative Union

An agency, with a long history of using Adobe creative software for all of its marketing and PR creative work, makes the move from Adobe Creative Suite to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

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Marcus Thomas LLC is the product of a union between two of Northeast Ohio’s oldest and largest independent advertising and public relations firms: Marcus Advertising, founded in Cleveland in 1946; and Ira Thomas Associates, founded in Youngstown in 1937. With decades of experience, Marcus Thomas recognized the importance of digital spaces early on and transformed into the fully integrated marketing agency it is today.

By upgrading to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, the agency simplifies licensing management while providing designers with access to a wider range of Adobe creative software.

“Our clients are on the latest software and it’s important that we are too. Working with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams keeps everyone on the same software version, from incoming interns to freelancers and clients,” says Amy Gressell, digital asset and creative systems manager at Marcus Thomas. “This eliminates the extra work that comes from constantly converting files and trying to manage multiple versions of software in house.”

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Opening doors to creativity

The Creative Cloud Packager also makes it easy for Gressell to package products and updates for designers depending on their software needs. For most of the active Creative Cloud for teams users at Marcus Thomas, Gressell delivers a standard package of applications including Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and Adobe InDesign CC. Those working with website design also use Adobe Flash Professional CC and Adobe Dreamweaver CC, while video editors work with Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

People don’t have time to learn something entirely new every time they want to use new software, so we appreciate the usability and consistency of the Adobe user interface across applications,” says Gressell. “Not only does it help our designers transition to new versions of software, but it also gives people a starting point when they want to experiment with other software.”

Marcus_3Web designers are starting to work with Adobe Muse CC to develop advanced website designs in a visual interface, while many designers have added Adobe Photoshop Lightroom to their workflows for its range of fast and simple photography editing features.

“We previously only offered a limited number of products to our design teams because it was too costly to buy separate full Creative Suite Master Collection licenses,” says Gressell. “The range of software in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams gives our designers a chance to experiment with new workflows to produce more creative work and meet our clients’ high standards.”

Read the Marcus Thomas LLC case study.

10:38 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Coming Next to Adobe Pro Video Tools

Creativity is about to get a lot more colorful: Updates coming to Creative Cloud pro video tools.

Adobe announced today a new wave of major updates for video pros coming soon to Creative Cloud. New versions of the video tools and services, including some brand new apps, will be presented next week at National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) tradeshow.

Visitors to the show will see a new Color workspace and a Lumetri Color panel in Adobe Premiere Pro CC, which offers an entirely new color workflow for editors; Adobe Character Animator, an amazing (and fun) interactive desktop animation tool; expanded scope for collaboration with Creative Cloud Libraries and Adobe Anywhere; “Project Candy,” an innovative mobile technology, currently under development for capturing and sharing Looks; and lots of cool new Adobe Magic that makes it easy to accomplish tasks that would have been difficult or impossible before.

Watch our NAB 2015 webcast shot live on the show floor. See Jason Levine demonstrate and explain the top features coming soon to the Adobe video tools.

 

Watch Al Mooney’s overview video introducing key video features in the next release:

Key themes of the upcoming release

  • New color workflows that make color an integral part of the creative process, including the Color workspace in the Lumetri Color panel and scopes in Premiere Pro CC and new Look support in Creative Cloud Libraries.
  • Mobile apps and integrations that extend the creative process, such as a streamlined workflow for opening Adobe Premiere Clip projects in Premiere Pro CC, and new mobile capture technology, Project Candy, for creating Looks to enhance the appearance of video footage.
  • Deeper collaboration for all—from small teams to large enterprises, including asset sharing via Creative Cloud Libraries for mobile-to-mobile and mobile-to-desktop workflows. And Adobe Anywhere, coming soon in two versions, offering collaborative editing workflows for teams of all sizes.
  • Tools and features that empower artists to create more and deliver faster: Adobe Character Animator, Morph Cut in Premiere Pro CC, Time Tuner in Adobe Media Encoder CC. Preview enhancements and Face Tracker in Adobe After Effects CC, and more.

Innovations like these are driving adoption of Adobe video workflows: recent Premiere Pro CC converts include the four-time Academy Award winning Coen Brothers, who are currently editing their film, Hail, Caesar!; and director Rhys Thomas and producer Lorne Michaels of NBC’s Saturday Night Live, with Staten Island Summer, a Paramount Pictures production, due out in 2015. In addition, MLB Network switched their editing and post-production environment to a complete Creative Cloud workflow.

“From script to screens, Adobe is delivering advanced workflows for every step of the creative journey. The industry is switching to Premiere Pro CC and our tightly integrated set of video tools because of the constant stream of innovation coming from our labs,” said Steve Warner, vice president of digital video and audio at Adobe.

“Our move to Creative Cloud, with deeply connected mobile-to-desktop workflows and services that make your assets available to you as you move from app to app, ensures our customers have the tools and services to create stunning videos, TV shows, films and commercials faster than before.”

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Editors have a lot to look forward to in the next release of Premiere Pro CC, starting with the all-new Color workspace and Lumetri Color panel providing powerful, yet easy-to-use, color tools inside Premiere Pro CC. Further extending their creative color workflows, Premiere Pro CC users will be able to apply Looks captured in the real world with Project Candy to add emotional impact and visual appeal to videos. Looks and graphics elements will be easily accessed in the application via Creative Cloud Libraries. Task-Oriented Workspaces organize the User Interface for the task at hand. Editors can also create and save custom workspaces to include the windows, tabs and tools that they use most.

It will be much easier to deliver polished interview content by smoothing out jump cuts in talking head shots with Morph Cut. Improved integration between Adobe Premiere Clip and Premiere Pro CC will offer a seamless transition from the mobile editing experience to the power of a professional desktop NLE. Other features coming in the next release include more streamlined audio workflows, caption burn-in, improved Mercury Transmit performance for external monitoring with third-party I/O hardware, support for Windows touch devices, new editing refinements, and even more file format support.

The ability to shape light and color is integral to the process of working with moving images,” said Al Mooney, senior product marketing manager. “Color tools should enable play and experimentation. They should be approachable, easy to understand, and easy to include in your post-production workflow.”

To learn more about what’s coming next, visit the Premiere Pro blog.

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Project Candy

“Project Candy” is the code name for an amazing new mobile technology, currently under development, that allows users to capture light and color from the things they see around them and save the results as Looks. Looks are like grading presets used to enhance the appearance of video footage, like those you can create in Adobe SpeedGrade CC or now in Premiere Pro CC.

“The brilliant thing about Project Candy, is that you don’t need to know anything about color grading to use it,” said senior product manager Patrick Palmer. “In the past you would need to be an expert colorist to match the Look of a scene in real-life. With Candy, you just need your phone.”

Looks saved in Project Candy are automatically available in Premiere Clip, Premiere Pro CC, and After Effects CC via Creative Cloud Libraries, where they can also be shared with colleagues.

Learn more about Project Candy on the Moving Colors blog.

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Adobe After Effects CC

The next release of After Effects CC will instantly feel faster for users, making it easy to explore their creativity while interacting with the software in new ways. Uninterrupted Preview allows users to explore design ideas, adjust properties, and even resize panels without stopping playback. Simplified Previews offers intuitive default behaviors to help new users get up and running faster while allowing experienced After Effects artists to customize their preview options to fit their preferred workflow.

“The preview enhancements in the coming release provide a more responsive and dynamic environment for motion graphics and visual effects work,” said Todd Kopriva, product manager for After Effects. “This allows artists to focus on the creative process and stay in the creative zone with fewer distractions or interruptions.”

Connected creativity takes a leap forward with Creative Cloud Libraries, putting assets right at the artist’s fingertips, including images, Looks, color swatches and vector graphics from other desktop and mobile apps like Adobe Shape CC.

Face Tracker is a new feature that makes it easy to map facial movements with exceptional accuracy, managing the level of detail you track. Users can use simple mask tracking for fast tracking (for example to blur out someone’s features) or use more detailed point or measurement tracking to apply precise effects, or export tracking data to Adobe Character Animator. Other enhancements in the new release include a more adaptable user interface and support for using touch controls to navigate between panels within the app.

Learn more about what’s coming next on the After Effects blog.

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Adobe Character Animator (Preview)

Adobe Character Animator offers a groundbreaking new experience for After Effects usersusing the computer’s webcam and microphone along with keyboard and mouse interaction allows users to animate characters created in Adobe Photoshop CC or Adobe Illustrator CC in real time, shaving many hours off the creative process.

“Character Animator makes it incredibly easy to bring life-like behavior figures and insert them into scenes including other actions like wind or snow,” said Kopriva. Users can record multiple takes and then stitch together the best performances for a great result. The best thing about it? It’s so much fun to use!”

Learn more about Character Animator on the After Effects blog.

Adobe Media Encoder CC

The next release of Media Encoder CC includes Time Tuner which lets editors and broadcasters automatically adjust the duration of broadcast deliverableswithout time-consuming micro-editing. Time Tuner will be available in the next release of Media Encoder CC. Video pros will also be able to output multichannel audio with new Dolby Digital and Dolby Digital Plus support in Media Encoder CC. And we’re adding support for encoding and decoding of JPEG 2000 in an MXF wrapper.

Learn more about what’s coming to Media Encoder CC on the Premiere Pro blog.

Adobe Audition CC

Editors and audio pros can get right to work, streaming native video formats inside the next release of Audition CC with Dynamic Link video streaming, and review full screen video on a separate monitor while editing audio. Live relinking allows users to replace assets within an open project and retain edits made to original clip.

Learn more about what’s coming next on the Adobe Audition blog.

More video updates

Record voiceover with your video capture as audio notes or for on-location reporting in Adobe Prelude CC. Bring editing projects into the Adobe SpeedGrade CC with Direct Link, now including support for the new Premiere Pro Lumetri color tools.

Adobe Anywhere

Adobe Anywhere is a breakthrough workflow platform that lets workgroups using Premiere Pro CC and Adobe Prelude CC collaborate with centralized media and assets across standard networks. Adobe Anywhere will soon be offered in two versions. A new, more cost-effective version of Adobe Anywhere will be available for teams of all sizes collaborating in a single location. Anywhere with Mercury Streaming Engines allows enterprise workgroups in multiple locations to work together on projects with shared access to all assets.

“The digital world is a connected world,” explained Bill Roberts. “Modern creative tools should reflect this and empower collaboration, whether in simple ways, like showing a client your work, or in complex remote production settings where artists around the world can work together on the same content even at the same time.”

Video professionals can get our best offer yet—40% off on Creative Cloud Complete

Join Adobe Creative Cloud Complete by May 29, 2015 and we’ll give you 40% off for your first year—that’s only US$29.99/month. Whether you’re moving up from Creative Suite, or moving over from Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, or Grass Valley Edius, there’s never been a better offer for joining Creative Cloud. Some conditions apply. Learn more.

“These new releases mark a significant step forward in our vision for a truly dynamic creative environment,” said Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “In the past, production pipelines have tended to be strictly linear with functions such as VFX and Color Grading being relegated to the end of the process, but connected creativity is much more freeform and great ideas can come at any point in the production process. Creative tools should work the way creative people do, and not the other way around.”

Additional resources:

Creative Cloud’s pro video tools
NAB Overall Reveal Datasheet
What’s New Document
Character Animator Datasheet

Watch our NAB 2015 webcast shot live on the show floor. See Jason Levine demonstrate and explain the top features coming soon to the Adobe video tools.

8:45 PM Comments (26) Permalink

First Federal Savings Bank, Designing for The Future

A small, fast-growing bank builds an in-house creative group to create exceptional content with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

FirstFed_1 Century-old First Federal Savings Bank’s mission is to be the best bank in the seven-county Idaho region it serves by achieving excellence in everything it does. As a small, growing financial institution, outsourcing content production seemed like the natural choice. But the bank soon saw an opportunity to gain more control and boost efficiency by moving creative and design activities in house.

Producing content in house

Today, a small staff handles everything from designing brochures and billboards to producing radio and TV ads—with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams. “We knew that to build a successful in-house creative team, the creative software we used would have to keep pace with our growth,” says Cornelius Brackett, media specialist for First Federal Savings Bank.

FirstFed_2 Brackett, who previously worked in purchasing at the bank, but had a background in design and technology, created some ATM ads that resonated with customers. Soon, the bank was asking him to edit brochures and create newspaper ads. Brackett eventually found himself spending 20 hours a week creating marketing materials including a local television commercial. “Adobe is the standard for creative tools, so I knew it was a no-brainer to move to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams to meet our creative needs,” Bracket says. “Our print houses and video producer had already switched to Adobe Creative Cloud, and it was important to be compatible with our vendors to avoid potential workflow issues.”

Making the case for cloud

Currently, the team supports design needs for eleven branches, but soon, the bank expects to expand to other locations, and to enhance its marketing through online channels too. “We plan to do more online marketing, including an imminent website redesign,” says Brackett. Adobe Creative Cloud for teams will provide the flexibility to grow while managing costs predictably. “We can package the applications for different team members, so that we’re not wasting any Creative Cloud licenses.”

FirstFed_3The team uses Adobe After Effects CC and Adobe Premiere Pro CC to produce some videos such as television spots, and Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe InDesign CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC to create print materials. Brackett is also experimenting with Creative Cloud mobile apps, including Adobe Photoshop Mix and Adobe Color CC, which he used to grab palettes from a unique color scheme in a new bank building to create materials that visually fit into targeted environments.

With interoperability between all of the apps in Creative Cloud continuing to streamline workflows, Brackett can work non-destructively, modifying background imagery or other elements up to the last minute. “The workflows among the Creative Cloud applications constantly become more integrated,” says Brackett. “This makes both learning and working with the applications more efficient. It just makes my job easier.”

Expanding horizons

By bringing design in house and moving to the cloud, the bank is conserving funds previously spent on outside vendors. Adding to the cost benefits, access to a wide array of creative software is spurring new ideas and opportunities. “We’re already creating a variety of content, and we see endless possibilities to do even more,” says Brackett. “Adobe Creative Cloud for teams really fosters productivity and creativity. I love nothing more than downloading a new piece of software and playing with it to get the creative juices flowing. It’s fun for me personally, and it helps us cultivate fresh ideas that genuinely benefit the bank.”

Read the First Federal Savings Bank case study.

8:34 AM Permalink

HaZ Goes Hollywood with Sci-Fi Teasers

Turning proof-of-concept shorts into feature film deals with Adobe Creative Cloud.

HaZ_1Soon after its release, Project Kronos was an Internet hit on YouTube and Vimeo. Viewers loved the gritty documentary feel of the fifteen-minute short created on a budget of just £3000 by Hasraf “HaZ” Dulull entirely with Adobe Creative Cloud applications, including Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC. Hollywood loved it, too. So much so, that HaZ was able to win his first feature film deal for a full-length version of the space exploration drama.

Hollywood is a long way from the buzzing streets of central London where HaZ grew up. As a boy, his interest in cinema was first piqued by VHS videos of Blade Runner and Alien. Fascinated by the special effects, the youngster carefully reviewed scenes, trying to discern how they were created. Meanwhile in school he started playing around with an early version of the Paint application. “The school computers wouldn’t let you save files, so day after day I would create the same image, improving it as I went along,” he recalls. “I got pretty good at pushing pixels that way.”

At sixteen, he got his first computer and was soon a keen gamer. His interest in pursuing a career in game design led him to choose Computer Science, Technology, and Design for his A Level exam subjects. As part of his schoolwork, he created and animated a film using 4-bit images. From there HaZ went on to study media communications and for his dissertation on video games he created a simple horror game.

From game cinematics to cinema

That helped him land his first video game job creating cinematics, the short films that serve as introductions to video game narratives and as “cut scenes” between levels. “By now I was working with the first wave of digital tools, including Alias Wavefront for animation, Photoshop for painting, Combustion for compositing, and Avid for editing,” says HaZ.

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“After a few years, I asked myself: ‘Why am I doing this?’ Why not work on actual films,” he continues. “So I got my first film job at the Moving Picture Company in London.” Starting in 2003, he worked his way up from compositor to lead compositor, finally becoming VFX supervisor on broadcast series such as America: The Story of US (History Channel) and Planet Dinosaurs (BBC), both of which earned him award nominations in 2011.

As a VFX supervisor he was soon working shoulder to shoulder with directors. “That became my film school,” he says. “I was helping filmmakers plan their productions in a way that avoided problems in post-production. This didn’t just teach me about the process of filmmaking, it deepened my understanding of storytelling and how each aspect of a film, if done right, supports the larger narrative.”

The role of VFX supervisor is an interesting one and tells us a lot about the evolution of filmmaking today. Originally, the VFX supervisor was brought on set to bridge the gap between filming and post production. They ensured that shots were captured correctly for efficient post-production and high-quality visual effects. Sometimes VFX supervisors even directed segments themselves. But the role has grown as the place for visual effects in filmmaking has matured. “As a VFX supervisor, I’m working with writers actors, directors, producers, executives,” says HaZ. “We’ve become very influential in the storytelling process and we’re usually brought in now during development, before the script is even green lit.”

Pitching feature films in Hollywood

Meanwhile, HaZ himself was also evolving and the idea for Project Kronos was born. “Project Kronos was the right thing at the right time,” he explains. “Gravity was hitting theaters and Interstellar was in production. Space stories were hot.” Project Kronos was picked up by Armory Films and Benderspink to turn into a full-length drama with HaZ attached to write and direct. All of a sudden, he was being asked to pitch ideas for other films.

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“Now I go into the meetings as a director and a writer,” he says, “and I don’t just bring a script with storyboards. I cut a short teaser of the film to show the studio execs what the film will look like. And I’m not just showing them the story, I’m showing them how it can be made.”

The approach has worked. In short order HaZ had three films in development with a fourth in the works. “It really helps that I can knock out the videos fast,” he explains. “Once I even cut a pitch trailer on the plane, on the way to Los Angeles. It’s so easy now: boot up the laptop, open the Creative Cloud apps and just get to work.”

The process itself is not new to him, just the ease with which he can do it. “I’ve been doing proof of concept stuff for a long time, but it used to be with disconnected tools,” he says. “With Creative Cloud I don’t have to deal with that anymore. I just bring everything into Premiere Pro CC and then connect the pieces. It makes it so much easier to sell an idea when you can show it already visualized.”

Building pitch trailers with Creative Cloud

One of the new projects is called Sync. Unlike Project Kronos, which is styled like a documentary, Sync is a sci-fi thriller. “I wanted to show I could create the kinds of action films that studios are often looking for from young first-time filmmakers,” he says.

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He even created a kind of pre-teaser to show potential collaborators what he wanted to make, including grading with Adobe SpeedGrade CC, to create atmosphere, and VFX created in Photoshop CC and After Effects CC. “That worked,” he smiles. “My test shots generated interest and I found my crew and actors just by showing it around.”

While shooting the Sync teaser, HaZ and his team were already doing rough assembly, which was easy, since Premiere Pro CC supports the native files right out of the camera. From there the short film was built stem-to-stern in Creative Cloud. “Adobe isn’t just creating tools, they’re creating workflows,” says HaZ. He is proud of this project, which he feels includes elements of Blade Runner, one of his first movie loves.

I.R.I.S, a third feature film project, combines the documentary storytelling style of Project Kronos with the sci-fi thriller genre of Sync. In this story, the globe is surrounded by miniature drones which, using sophisticated artificial intelligence, monitor and police human activity.

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I.R.I.S. was created using the same workflow as Project Kronos and Sync. As with those shorts, HaZ made extensive use of After Effects CC for compositing CG elements into the live action, as well as augmenting stock footage. HaZ created I.R.I.S. before Sync but it was released afterwards. “It was a project I developed with another production company in Los Angeles to pitch as a feature film,” explains HaZ. “We never intended to release this one as a short film, but after all the buzz around Sync it made sense to make this public, too.

“I asked my DP on I.R.I.S. if he could find some guys who could help out as marines in the film. When I turned up on set these guys were fully kitted out with enough weaponry to start a small war—all replicas of course! They were awesome to work with and totally loved films like Aliens, so directing them was a blast. Naturally, I used them again on Sync for much bigger action scenes.”

A playground for developing ideas

As all of these short film projects show, Creative Cloud gives HaZ a digital playground for developing ideas. The result in each case is not just a story idea, but clear ideas for how to make it efficiently and cost-effectively. For example, HaZ has made extensive use of Adobe Audition CC to map out audio for his projects. “Sound studio time is really expensive, so it helps a lot if I can show exactly how I want the audio to be done, and the audio people end up using many of the original sound elements I created,” says HaZ. “And I’m not even an audio guy!”

The design tools have also proven useful in fleshing out concepts. “For one project I was asked how I thought it could be marketed, so I grabbed some stills and designed a poster for the film,” he says. “Typekit is a lifesaver for me, too—not just for making posters, but for titling and design elements within the films. I also used Creative Cloud Assets to create graphics in Sync. I don’t want to be thinking about tools when I’m doing my work. Everything I need I already have in Creative Cloud.”

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After a year of polishing the script, HaZ is now gearing up for his feature film directorial debut on Project Kronos, which will go into production in 2015. While this will bring new experiences, he feels very much at home in the process. “I don’t need to worry about post, or editorial, because I know I have all the tools to get the job done.
 

In case you missed it… from October 2013, Creating a Great Pitch Trailer for your Feature Film, an Ask A Pro session with HaZ Dullul.

(HaZ is represented by manager Scott Glassgold of IAM Entertainment.)

3:10 PM Permalink

At SXSW 2015: Twice As Many Films Cut with Adobe Premiere Pro

Over 120 films at this year’s SXSW Film used Adobe Creative Cloud video applications, including 60 edited on Premiere Pro.

What a difference a year makes.

Last year at the 2014 SXSW Film Conference & Festival, a respectable 23 films had been cut with Premiere Pro CC, including gems like Evaporating Borders, by Iva Radivojevic, and The Immortalists, by Jason Sussberg and David Alvarado.

THE BOY, helmed by Craig McNeill,  premiering at SXSW 2015.

THE BOY, helmed by Craig McNeill, premiering at SXSW 2015.

This year the total has more than doubled with 60 films showing this year edited in Adobe’s professional NLE. Similar growth in Premiere Pro CC and Creative Cloud usage was seen at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and 2014 ended with a bang with the release of David Fincher’s Gone Girl, edited entirely in Premiere Pro CC with over 80% of the film’s effects assembled in Adobe After Effects CC.

“We’re really excited to see our growth at SXSW, especially given how this event cuts across genres to showcase artistry in so many different disciplines,” said Al Mooney, product manager for Premiere Pro CC. “The application is increasingly becoming the go-to NLE, both for established and up-and-coming filmmakers,” he explained. “Editors tell us they feel right at home very quickly and Premiere Pro CC’s  tight integration with other Creative Cloud applications, like After Effects CC and Adobe Photoshop CC make this an incredible creative environment in which to work.”

Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015

For filmmakers attending SXSW, Adobe will be hosting Creative Camp on Friday, March 13 and Saturday, March 14 with two sessions focused on video content creation and storytelling.

Below is a listing of films showing at the 2015 SXSW film Conference & Festival that incorporated Premiere Pro CC in their post-production workflow.

Narrative Feature Competition

  • THE BOY: Craig Macneill, director; Craig Macneill and Clay McLeod Chapman, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • Creative Control: Benjamin Dickinson, director; Benjamin Dickinson and Micah Bloomberg, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • KRISHA: Trey Edward Shults, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • Uncle John: Steven Piet, director; Erik Crary and Steven Piet, screeenwriters (World Premiere).

Documentary Feature Competition

  • Peace Officer: Scott Christopherson and Brad Barber, directors (World Premiere).
  • Twinsters: Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, directors (World Premiere).

Narrative Spotlight

  • The Frontier: Oren Shai, director; Webb Wilcoxen and Oren Shai, screenwriters (World Premiere).

Documentary Spotlight

Uncle John, directed by Steven Piet, premiering at SXSW 2015 in the Narrative Competition.

Uncle John, directed by Steven Piet, premiering at SXSW 2015 in the Narrative Competition.

Visions

  • Ava’s Possessions: Jordan Galland, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • The Nymphets: Gary Gardner, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • Planetary (UKUK/USA): Guy Reid, director; Steve Watts Kennedy, screenwriter (World Premiere).
  • A Wonderful Cloud: Eugene Kotlyarenko, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).

Midnighters

  • The Diabolical: Alistair Legrand, director; Alistair Legrand and Luke Harvis, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • Excess Flesh: Patrick Kennelly, director; Sigrid Gilmer and Patrick Kennelly, screenwriters (World Premiere).
  • The Nightmare: Rodney Ascher, director.
  • Pod: Mickey Keating, director/screenwriter (World Premiere).

24 Beats Per Second

SXGlobal

  • Free Entry (Hungary): Yvonne Kerékgyártó, director/screenwriter (North American Premiere).

Festival Favorites

  • Being Evel: Daniel Junge, director; Daniel Junge and Davis Coombe, screenwriters.

Special Events

Narrative Shorts

Documentary Shorts

Animated Shorts

  • Butter Ya’Self : Julian Petschek, director.
  • Half Wet (UK): Sophie Koko Gate, director.
  • PALM ROT: Ryan Gillis, director.
  • Pig: Steven Subotnick, director.
  • teeth (UK/Hungary/USA): Daniel Gray and Tom Brown, directors.
Twinsters, directed by  Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, a documentary premiering at SXSW 2015.

Twinsters, directed by Samantha Futerman and Ryan Miyamoto, a documentary premiering at SXSW 2015.

Midnight Shorts

Texas Shorts

Texas High School Shorts

Music Videos

Learn more about the pro video tools in Creative Cloud.

12:10 PM Permalink

The Streamlined Creative Process of 3B Scientific

The global marketing team of this manufacturer of medical education equipment and content is more efficient and productive thanks to the collaborative features in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

3B_1The international group of companies known as 3B Scientific specializes in the manufacturing and marketing of educational materials for the science and medical fields. Headquartered in Germany with affiliated companies in more than 100 countries, 3B Scientific produces product lines that include artificial skeletons, anatomical models, medical training simulators, acupuncture and therapy products, and a wide range of biology, chemistry, and physics equipment.


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Collaboration across borders

The marketing team at 3B Scientific uses Creative Cloud for teams to develop catalogs, brochures, logos, internal documents, websites, mobile design ads, direct mail pieces, and even T-shirt designs. Adobe Photoshop CC provides excellent image enhancement tools, while Adobe Illustrator CC is the go-to solution for logos and graphics, and Adobe InDesign CC supports creative layout for print pieces.

Although the marketing group previously used Final Cut Pro for video editing, the company is taking advantage of the wide range of software in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams by switching to Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects CC. “Working with Creative Cloud for teams means that we have all of the creative tools we need at our fingertips,” says Joseph Allen, senior graphic designer at 3B Scientific. “We can also experiment with new software at any time to expand our skills and creative offerings (our graphic designers, in particular, appreciate the chance to play around with it).”

3B_3 In addition to the benefits that come with standardizing software, 3B Scientific takes advantage of the cloud storage available with its Creative Cloud for teams membership to simplify sharing files. When downloading files to individual desktops and working with colleagues in different time zones, it can be difficult to keep track of which files are the most recent; cloud storage solves this problem, helping marketers around the world quickly locate the latest versions of projects and files. “Rather than emailing files back and forth, the cloud storage gives us a central area to store and sync files,” says Allen. “It streamlines our processes to make collaborating anywhere in the world incredibly simple.”

Creative Cloud for teams also syncs projects, settings, and even fonts for users who take work home. By creating seamless workflows and collaborative processes, it enables the global marketing team to be more efficient and productive. “Coordinating with colleagues in Europe and Asia can be a time-consuming process. There are many opportunities for our lines to get crossed, which can cause miscommunications and delays,” says Allen. “With Creative Cloud for teams, we’re improving our communication and collaboration, which ultimately enhances our ability to share valuable knowledge with customers worldwide.”

Read the 3B Scientific case study.

12:37 PM Permalink

Sundance Filmmaker Antonio Ribeiro Brings His Creativity Online

For those who were following the Sundance Film Festival this year, Antonio Ribeiro may be a familiar name. Ribeiro is the editor and producer of Things of the Aimless Wanderer, a film by Kivu Ruhorahoza.

Since his debut feature film Grey Matter, which premiered at Tribeca in 2011, scooping the Juri Special Mention and Best Actors award, Antonio has been collaborating with Kivu Ruhorahoza, creating Moon Road Films, a production company whose main mission is to find original new ways to tell stories. Their latest film is one of only half dozen or so selected feature films screened in the New Frontier category at the renowned festival.

MoonRoad_Website

As if that’s not impressive enough, Antonio Riberio is also the man behind the film’s accompanying website. Although he doesn’t see himself as a web designer, that’s exactly the role he found himself in, as time was running out prior to the World Premiere of Things of the Aimless Wanderer.

When you have a film on your hands that you know is going places, you need an online destination for fans, critics and other stakeholders. You need a site that can support embedded video, have social media sharing capabilities, incorporate a tagging structure and host a blog. Oh, and of course it needs to look good and be easy to navigate, interactive, and intuitive.

In comes the Creative Cloud.

Ribeiro, who used Adobe Premiere Pro CC to cut Things of the Aimless Wanderer and Adobe After Effects CC to deal with some needed matting and mask work, is a Creative Cloud subscriber. He turned his attention from purple to green.

“Although I am not a web developer or designer, I started to explore the use of  Dreamweaver CC, as it provided an interface between language and design,” said Ribeiro. “Initially I was not familiar with HTML or CSS, but after using Dreamweaver CC and reading a few tutorials I was able to make sense of what I was doing.”

He did have some help. Ribeiro opted to purchase a website template in order to get a professional looking site off the ground without significant costs, time constraints or the technical demands of also learning how to be a full-fledged web designer. He loaded the template into Dreamweaver CC and began to explore, learning along the way.

“Dreamweaver has given me an understanding of what HTML and CSS do. Using the Live tab I can understand behavior through the ability to Extract Assets from Photoshop CC comps,” said Ribeiro.

“I feel it’s strange for me to say this, as I always feel slightly self-conscious that I am no expert, but I now have the confidence to look at a template and understand how it breaks down into its different components.”

Ingenuity is often born from circumstance, and Ribeiro certainly had a need to fill and a limited budget to make it so.

“After all, I am a filmmaker but if I can make and customize good looking sites for my different projects, then it’s a win-win situation,” said Ribeiro. “In this business, good presentation counts.”

In the end, from film to website, Creative Cloud touched each step of Ribeiro’s workflow. In many ways, he represents the kind of new creative who runs a small shop, wears many hats and learns to tackle new aspects of a growing business on the fly.

“The best thing I could have done, was to embrace the Cloud, where I can have access to all the programs I need for one single monthly fee,” said Ribeiro.

Learn more about Things of the Aimless Wanderer in this video:

Download a free trial of Adobe Dreamweaver CC today to start pushing your creative boundaries.

10:24 AM Permalink

A New Year, A New Name—Video and Audio Social Channel Changes

Join us in welcoming the newly-minted Adobe Creative Cloud Video & Audio feeds to Facebook and Twitter.

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We’ll be sharing tutorials, interesting product and industry news, customer stories and much more about our pro video applications.

Creative Cloud Video & Audio accounts will feature cutting-edge content for ALL Adobe pro video tools, including Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe Audition CC, Adobe SpeedGrade CC, Adobe Story CC Plus, Adobe Prelude CC, Adobe Premiere Clip, and Adobe Media Encoder CC. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter starting today.

Want more? The following accounts feature tool-specific posts:
Adobe Premiere Pro on Facebook and Twitter
Adobe After Effects on Facebook and Twitter
Adobe Premiere Clip on Twitter

A note about Twitter: From now on, Adobe Story CC Plus, Adobe SpeedGrade and Adobe Prelude content will be shared on Adobe CC Pro Video & Audio (@AdobeCCVideo). Follow us there.

4:06 PM Permalink

Adobe at Sundance Film Festival 2015

We’re at Sundance Film Festival 2015; check out what we’re up to:

A panel streaming LIVE: Blurring The Lines between Indie And Hollywood

On Friday January 23, Adobe will host a discussion on how technology is blurring the lines between indie and Hollywood filmmaking. Panelists include Rob Legato (Misery Loves Comedy, Sundance Film Festival 2015; The Wolf of Wall StreetHUGOAVATAR), Kyle Patrick Alvarez (The Stanford Prison Experiment, Sundance Film Festival 2015, C.O.G. Sundance Film Festival 2013, and Easier with Practice), and Dave Ginsberg, CTO of the Sundance Institute. Learn more and register for the LIVE streamed event: http://bit.ly/1tGTXNx

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A #SundanceSpotlight: Shining a light on the Sundance journey

Attendees are invited to create a quick video showing:

  • The moment you knew you wanted to be a filmmaker
  • What inspires you creatively
  • What brings you to Sundance

Include #SundanceSpotlight when sharing (publicly of course!) for a chance to be featured on Adobe social media channels. #SundanceSpotlight videos published from Adobe Premiere Clip may also be shown on special screens around Park City, and the in-app Community Feed.

The first 50 videos shared using #SundanceSpotlight will get a free 3-month Creative Cloud membership—so get started ASAP.

And films: Highlighting Adobe Creative Cloud workflows

Adobe is proud to report that 21 films debuting at Sundance Film Festival this year were edited with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Find the complete list below & stay tuned for more blog posts and video interviews with these filmmakers during the festival.

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Misery Loves Comedy (Special Events)—Kevin Pollak, director; Kevin Pollak and John Varhous, screenwriters
Do you have to be miserable to be funny? Children cry, “Hey, look at me,” but who turns that into a profession? Over 50 funny people, like Tom Hanks, Larry David, Jimmy Fallon, Judd Apatow, and Amy Schumer share pain-filled insights from a life in pursuit of laughter. World Premiere. Cast: Tom Hanks, Larry David, Amy Schumer, Jimmy Fallon, Judd Apatow, Jim Gaffigan.

The Stanford Prison Experiment (US Dramatic Competition)—Kyle Patrick Alvarez, director; Tim Talbott, screenwriter
Based on the actual events that took place in 1971, when Stanford professor Dr. Philip Zimbardo created what became one of the most shocking and famous social experiments of all time. Cast: Billy Crudup, Ezra Miller, Michael Angarano, Tye Sheridan, Johnny Simmons, Olivia Thirlby.

Advantageous (US Dramatic Competition)—Jennifer Phang, director; Jacqueline Kim and Jennifer Phang, screenwriters
In a near-future city where soaring opulence overshadows economic hardship, Gwen and her daughter, Jules, do all they can to hold on to their joy, despite the instability surfacing in their world. Cast: Jacqueline Kim, James Urbaniak, Freya Adams, Ken Jeong, Jennifer Ehle, Samantha Kim.

Being Evel (US Documentary Competition)—Daniel Junge, director
Millions know the man, but few know his story. Academy Award-winner Daniel Junge (Saving Face) and actor/producer Johnny Knoxville take a candid look at American daredevil and icon Robert “Evel” Knievel while reflecting on our voracious public appetite for heroes and spectacle.

Fresh Dressed (Documentary Premieres)—Sacha Jenkins, director
The history of hip-hop fashion from its birth in the South Bronx to its rise as a billion-dollar global industry, Fresh Dressed is supported by rich archival materials, in-depth interviews with individuals crucial to the evolution, and the outsiders who study and admire them.

Things of the Aimless Wanderer (New Frontier)—Kivu Ruhorahoza, director and screenwriter
A white man meets a black girl, then she disappears. The white man tries to understand what happened to her while also trying to finish a travelogue. Things of the Aimless Wanderer is a film about the sensitive topic of relations between “locals” and Westerners, and about paranoia, mistrust, and misunderstandings. Cast: Justin Mullikin, Grace Nikuze, Ramadhan Bizimana, Eliane Umuhire, Wesley Ruzibiza, Matt Ray Brown. World Premiere

Cop Car (Park City at Midnight)—Jon Watts, director; Christopher D. Ford and Jon Watts, screenwriters
Two ten-year-old boys steal an abandoned cop car. World Premiere. Cast: Kevin Bacon, James Freedson-Jackson, Hays Wellford, Shea Whigham, Camryn Manheim.

Short films

Every Day—Gabe Spitzer, director

Followers—Tim Marshall, director

Greenland—Oren Gerner, director

Hotel 22—Elizabeth Lo, director

Making it in America—Joris Debeij, director

OM Rider—Takeshi Murata, director

Palm Rot—Ryan Gillis, director

Papa Machette—Jonathan David Kane, director

Russian Roulette—Ben Aston, director

Symphony no. 42—Réka Bucsi, director

Storm hits jacket—Paul Cabon, director

The Sun Like a Big Dark Animal—Christina Felisgrau and Ronnie Rivera, directors

The Face of Ukraine: Casting Oksana Baiul—Kitty Green, director

The Collectors: Beekeeper—Steven Cantor, director
The Sundance Film Festival takes place January 22–February 1 in Park City, Utah. Check the Sundance Film Festival website for the schedule and theatre listings.

Learn more about the Pro Video Tools in Adobe Creative Cloud.

11:20 AM Permalink

The 4K Production Workflow of Nippon Television Network

Japanese broadcaster, Nippon Television Network, implements a cost-effective solution based on Adobe Creative Cloud to create a dynamic and efficient workflow for ultra-high definition 4K broadcasts.

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When the first 4K channel in Japan, Channel 4K, began test broadcasts, it started by airing live musical performances, travelogues, and sports broadcasts provided for free by members of the Next Generation Television & Broadcasting Promotion Forum. Since then, broadcasters have started to produce their own 4K programming , but the equipment remains costly. In addition, transcoding and outputting programs takes a great deal of time.

Originally a format developed for feature-length films, 4K was not intended for television programming where high volume production is valued. To begin introducing original 4K content in the broadcast space, Nippon Television Network Corporation (Nippon TV) developed a 4K programming production workflow using Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

The benefits of enterprise licenses

Since 1953, when Nippon TV became the first commercial television broadcaster in Japan, Nippon TV has entertained audiences with excellent programming, from professional sports to scripted dramas. Nippon TV first deployed Adobe Creative Cloud for 4K productions in the technical operations department of the engineering & technology division. This department handles a wide variety of operations, including CG, data broadcasts, media conversion, and remote subsystems. The department’s office space is filled with computers—some loaded with Autodesk Softimage to create CG infographics, while others are used to develop other graphics displayed within programs.

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When deciding between teams or enterprise licensing, the technical operations department chose to work with Creative Cloud for enterprise. “For security reasons, our work computers are not connected to the Internet so the enterprise license was a better fit for us,” says Ayato Fujii, CG designer for the technical operations department, engineering & technology division. “Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise includes all of the design tools we need: Adobe Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, and After Effects CC.”

“We have always used Adobe creative software, and now Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise offers us a cost- effective way to provide everyone with the applications they need,” adds Toru Fujihara, associate managing director of the technical operations department, engineering & technology division. Yasuo Tsutsumi, CG designer in the graphic design department at the Nippon Television Art Media Design Center adds, “With Adobe Creative Cloud, we can install a full range of creative software onto all of our designers’ computers, which has everyone very excited.”

Developing high-quality 4K content

The technical operations department deployed Creative Cloud for enterprise on the workstations of all designers. The Creative Cloud implementation provided an opportunity to also switch from EDIUS editing systems to Adobe Premiere Pro CC to reduce costs, add integration with After Effects CC, and support the Grass Valley HQ/HQX codecs. “We do a great deal of CG work for our TV broadcasts,” says Fujii. “By using the Grass Valley HQ codec with Adobe Premiere Pro CC, we can attach 4K monitors to our work computers to create true 4K machines that leverage Adobe’s support for cutting-edge hardware and standards.”

Designing a new environment

One of the first 4K programs Fujihara worked to develop for Nippon TV using Creative Cloud was a video art exhibit across three 4k screens recreating the famous stone garden at Ryoanji Temple in Kyoto. The video was displayed in the “Kyoto from Inside and Outside: Scenes on Panels and Folding Screens” special exhibit at Tokyo National Museum. Nippon TV designers used Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Photoshop CC to pull the footage together and give visitors a taste of Ryoanji Temple across four seasons.

Four Seasons of the Ryoanji Temple Rock Garden in 4K, from the special exhibition, “Kyoto from Inside and Outside: Scenes on Panels and Folding Screens."

Four Seasons of the Ryoanji Temple Rock Garden in 4K, from the special exhibition, “Kyoto from Inside and Outside: Scenes on Panels and Folding Screens.”

Shooting at Ryoanji Temple started one year before the exhibition. At the time, Nippon TV did not have an environment that could view 4K footage so the team decided to implement a turnkey system that supported 4K in native resolution. One of the deciding factors for the system was that it also needed to support 60 frames per second.

“We produced the Ryoanji Temple footage in 30p, so there was no need for 60p support for that project,” says Fujihara. “However, we knew that we would need 60p support for future broadcasts that may involve fast motion, such as sports programming. By deploying Creative Cloud on Windows workstations loaded with Epoch 4K Supernova cards from BlueFish, we achieved a system similar to turnkey systems.”

Pitching live baseball broadcasts

Another project driven by Nippon TV was a broadcast of the October 2013 professional baseball match between the Yomiuri Giants and the Yakult Swallows in Tokyo Dome recorded using four 4K cameras and one high-speed camera. Unlike other types of content, baseball broadcasts fill a very long slot in the schedule.

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First, Nippon TV shot the action in Tokyo Dome using five cameras, four of which recorded in SR-Lite mode on Sony’s Simple Studio Profile (SStP) codec. Next, the team edited the 4K footage on the Premiere Pro CC timeline and exported the final program in XAVC format. “When we started on our programs, Premiere Pro CC was one of the only applications that could output in XAVC format,” says Fujihara. “We knew we wanted to use XAVC output from the start, but being able to use Premiere Pro CC through final delivery really helped our workflow. We could not have produced the two 4K videos without Premiere Pro CC.”

Fujii concludes, “From a creator’s point of view, it’s a chance we couldn’t pass up. We’re glad to have Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise to help us continue to push the creativity limits of our production broadcasts.”

Read the Nippon Television Network case study.

9:59 AM Permalink