Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe Stretches the Creative Canvas to Apple Watch with Three New Apps

Imagine if you could channel all the creative productivity lost from checking your phone hundreds of times a day into a new project—what would you create? The arrival of the Apple Watch, and the ability to prioritize and customize alerts, signals a shift in how we’ll interact with personal technology.

We certainly expect Adobe customers—some of the most creative people on the planet—to be early adopters of the Apple Watch. That’s because designers get a lot of their best ideas not while sitting at our desks, but from interacting with and observing the world around us. Geoff Dowd, our director of experience design, made this point in a recent New York Times article. When Geoff has a few spare minutes, he hops on his bike and takes in the vibrant district around Adobe’s San Francisco design studio.

This is Adobe’s mission: to stretch the mobile canvas and inspire creatives. So today we updated three of our popular iPhone apps to add support for Apple Watch: Behance, Adobe Color CC, and Creative Cloud. The intersection of Creative Cloud and wearable technology has arrived:

Watch_1.BehanceStatsPrioritize projects with Behance: Whether you’re with a client or away from your desk—customize Behance notifications so that a glance displays your most meaningful daily stats. Behance is the world’s leading creative community, where you can get feedback and find inspiration from over five million creative peers.

iOS 8 iPhone 6The new release of Behance app for iPhone makes interaction with critical updates frictionless, bringing your Inbox, Notifications, My Work, and Nearby directly to your Apple Watch. Remotely control Airplay presentations of your online portfolio from your watch to open a Behance project and step through the individual images of a project presentation. Use Handoff to move seamlessly from your Apple Watch to your iPhone when you want to comment on a file or project; use the share dialog to post a link to Facebook, Twitter and other services.

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Get out there… and make something colorful: The always-on culture has often meant we miss those precious moments of inspiration and ideating around us. With Adobe Color CC, see the world in a spectrum of color, wherever your inspiration takes you. Pair the app with your Apple Watch and turn on geo-location to reveal color themes that were captured nearby. Discover the colors in the world around you—view the theme, name, distance, and map location.
Watch_4.ColorSaveSwipe to see the ten most popular themes in the vicinity. Extend your mobile and desktop workflows by adding new color swatches to your Creative Cloud Libraries design assets as-is, or pass one to your iPhone for real-time adjustments. And this is all available back at your desk, thanks to your unique Creative Profile, so you can continue working in CC desktop tools.

Watch_5.CCWatchWear Adobe Creative Cloud on your wrist: Many folks have asked us about the update for Creative Cloud app for iPhone, that Apple shows on the Watch TV commercial—it’s now here! Gone are the days of being chained to your desk or phone constantly monitoring for client feedback, new projects, design assets and more; set up Apple Watch to monitor activity on shared Creative Cloud files, view and reply to comments on a file, accept or decline invitations to collaborate, and more. The effortless mobile to desktop workflows across devices and apps enabled by Creative Profile and Creative Cloud Libraries make this all possible.

We’re looking forward to seeing the Apple Watch journey unfold—you can be sure that the first generation is just the start of amazing things to come. Similar to our other recent platform explorations Adobe Ink & Slide and our touch work on Microsoft Surface, how customers interact with Apple Watch will guide us. We can’t wait to hear where you take your newfound freedom. Anything is possible—get out there.

Check out these new apps:

 
Follow David Macy on Twitter.

11:00 AM Comments (1) Permalink

Show Marvel Your Best Work

 

Are you a student looking to showcase your talent, get advice from top-tier professionals, gain invaluable real-world experience, and build your portfolio? If so, Adobe has the perfect opportunity for you:

We’ve teamed up with Marvel to make comic book history and give you a chance to apply your cutting-edge skills.

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What’s the deal?

We’re looking for four (4) students with four (4) distinct styles to team up with Marvel pros to create a limited-edition Avengers comic, powered by Creative Cloud, to debut during San Diego Comic-Con.

If chosen, you’ll contribute to a new Marvel comic, get a ticket to San Diego Comic-Con, and a one-on-one portfolio review with the Marvel pros. Your comic will also be printed and distributed in comic stores across the United States. (You may also be featured on the Adobe Students social channels to help your portfolio stand out to future employers.)

Who we’re looking for

Students (in or outside the USA) aged eighteen (18) and over, who are passionate about illustration, digital media, animation, and comics. Since storytelling is crucial in comic books, we’ll be keeping an eye out for sequential samples, regardless of style.

How to be considered

Tag your best original non-Marvel work on your Behance portfolio with #madethis #Marvel. If you don’t have a Behance portfolio, you can make one by simply signing up on Behance and uploading your work.

Submission deadline

Work must be tagged on Behance no later than April 13, 2015 for consideration.

Some questions and answers

  • Who’s eligible to participate? Currently enrolled students from all majors and backgrounds. You must be over the age of eighteen (18).
  • I don’t live in the US, can I participate? Yes. The opportunity is available globally.
  • Will I be paid for my work? Yes. Each selected student will receive a cash payment.
  • Will hotel and accommodations be taken care of at San Diego Comic-Con? Yes. The selected students traveling to San Diego Comic-Con will have transportation and hotel accommodations planned and paid for by Adobe, as well as a daily stipend.
  • I’m from outside the US, will my visa be taken care of? If you’re chosen, you will be responsible for applying for your visa. It can be completed by visiting esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta and following the application directions. We will reimburse you for any costs needed to obtain your visa.
  • Do I need Creative Cloud to participate? You will need a Behance portfolio and Creative Cloud skills.  If you aren’t already a Creative Cloud member, download free trials of the Creative Cloud apps.
7:53 AM Permalink

SXSW 2015: Top Takeaways for Creatives

SXSW Interactive is a hub of activity, new ideas, inspiration, and learning. Adobe was out in full force at SXSW 2015, with a two-day Creative Camp (plus additional sessions) during the conference.

The sessions we presented covered a broad range, from the future of Photoshop to creating video for social media to discussions of the creative potential in failure and inefficiency.

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Two themes kept cropping up across the different sessions. First:

The pace of change continues to accelerate

New tools, new frameworks, and new ways to work or to find work—the creative world is changing faster than ever. Portfolios need to be updated regularly and new work shared. And working with different teams and across a broader range of devices is a necessity.

As Paul Trani pointed out, the fundamentals of design haven’t changed. Which leads to the next big takeaway:

The ability to be creative is more important than ever

Creativity not only allows you to bring ideas to life, it’s important in many other areas of life: From how to respond to challenges, to how to reach the people who will hire you, and weaving together the threads of a story you’re trying to tell… all (and more) require creative thinking. Good design is more and more important to the success of not just apps or websites but entire companies.

All these things make now one of the best times ever to be a creative professional or to become one.

Over the next weeks we’ll be sharing in-depth posts with key content from each session. The first post on Revamping Adobe Photoshop CC for Screen Design is already up. You can also see what people were saying about the sessions in real-time by checking out #AdobeSXSW on Twitter.

1:36 PM Permalink

Working Late with Samantha Warren

We’ll be welcoming designer Samantha Warren at our next Working Late event on Wednesday March 11—if you aren’t already signed up, there’s still time to grab a ticket from Eventbrite.

Samantha will be presenting “Mind the Gap: Becoming a better designer by owning your blind spots”; she was kind enough to spend some time answering a few of our questions about her work as she prepares for Wednesday’s talk.

Who are your mentors and what have you learned from them?

I don’t have “mentors” so much as I have a personal board of advisors. OK, that sounds too fancy, but I have a very talented husband who is a designer, and friends and family who are all brilliant and successful across many disciplines. I go to them for a lot. Make friends with those you look up to, because they will help you to be better.

Some things they’ve taught me:

  • HTML and CSS
  • To always have a good accountant
  • To use Illustrator symbols for making wireframes faster
  • And to never buy cheap tools or desk chairs.

Where do you find your inspiration for design?

Everywhere: history, fashion, culture, environment, books, and art.

Inspiration is less something you seek and more something you keep yourself open to receiving. It’s all around us, it’s just a matter of taking it and connecting it to something in our everyday work. Art and history are big ones for me. There are so many rich associations and feelings that have already been dug up and explored, and it’s just a matter of reinterpreting them in our everyday work.

All photos courtesy of Samantha Warren.

All photos courtesy of Samantha Warren.

Environments are also really strong inspirations for me, particularly in California where there is so much textural contrast in both rural and urban spaces. Just look at downtown San Francisco, with interesting visual juxtapositions that you can see just by walking down the street. There are beautifully-worn facades next to new and modern architecture, and signage and lettering that run the gamut of time periods… all of this nestled in a city that itself is juxtaposed against this fairytale backdrop with the blue-gray bay and the mountains of Marin. The geometric lines of the bridges set against the fog and the organic lines of Yerba Buena Island… there is just so much to be inspired by.

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What was your favorite project to work on? Why?

It’s hard to have a favorite design project. Design projects are like children; they’re all special for different reasons. But there is one art project that stands out.

You know how some cities have community art projects? The city votes on a sculpture and local artists all get sponsored to paint versions of it differently and then they’re displayed around town. When I was in college I submitted and was selected to paint a Rockfish in Richmond, Virginia. My Rockfish was a beauty pageant winner with a sequined dress and a big pearl necklace. My entire family pitched in to help me with it. It was one of the most fun projects I’ve ever had the opportunity to work on, but it was a challenge. I had never worked with the fiberglass medium that the fish was made of, so I had to be flexible and resourceful in order to build up the lady parts that my fish needed to have. I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, and that made it all the more fun.

What’s your daily routine?

I’ve tried to develop a more disciplined routine, especially after reading Twyla Tharp’s book The Creative Habit, but then I don’t follow through; I like to have a “framework” for tackling the day:

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  • I wake up to my cat meowing in my face and pawing at my ear.
  • Then I enjoy coffee and breakfast with my husband in our SF apartment (which is also my office).
  • I scan Twitter for my daily design, animal parody, and world news.
  • I try to do some sort of exercise or go for a walk or jog.
  • And give myself a deadline to be at work by 9:00am.

My day is then usually mixed between calls, design, and other work-related activities. I may meet a friend or potential client for lunch or coffee and usually try and take another trip to the park. (I love the parks in San Francisco.) I also try and make time for at least one day a week at the ceramics studio, and one day a week for an outing at the beach, a museum, or a drive.

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In anticipation of your Working Late talk, how about a teaser?

“The seed for your next art work lies embedded in the imperfections of your current piece.” —Art & Fear by David Bayles & Ted Orland

It will be a treat hearing more from Samantha next Wednesday. If you haven’t signed up already, claim your spot on Eventbrite.

11:50 AM Permalink

A Few Minutes with Stephen Coles

We’re looking forward to our first Working Late event in San Francisco this Wednesday (February 25) with editor/typographer Stephen Coles. If you haven’t already grabbed tickets, there’s still room; claim one from the Eventbrite page.

Stephen will be presenting “A Typeface is a Chair,” which interweaves typography with Mid-century Modernist furniture design. To gear up for the talk, we asked Stephen a few questions about typography, his influences, and some of his favorite typographic inspirations.

Illustration by Laura Serra.

Illustration by Laura Serra.

Illustration by Laura Serra.

Illustration by Laura Serra.



What excites you most about typography?

Just when I think I’ve seen it all—every typographic possibility has been exploited, the font market is saturated—someone does something new. Almost as exciting is when I discover that one of these things was done 50 years ago and most people didn’t realize it. That’s the stuff I usually post on Fonts In Use or Flickr.

Coles_2

Who are your mentors? What are the most memorable things they’ve taught you?

My first boss in the type industry, Erik Spiekermann, taught me an important lesson about hiring: Don’t start with a position and look for candidates to fill it. Instead, seek out smart people you trust and want to work with, and let them create the position that fits them.

My other mentor is my mom. She told me to be kind to people.

What are some fun places to go for typographic inspiration both online and off?

Online: Flickr is the best place on the Internet to see old type specimens, rare magazines, and weird signs. Forget Instagram for type (Instagram is for pet videos and things that are square. Type is almost never square.)

Offline: San Francisco Signseeing
Coles_31. Mission Street, from 16th to Cesar Chavez.


Coles_42. The Dahl-Beck Electric sign on Mission and 2nd.


Coles_53. The nineteenth-century gravestones in Oakland’s Mountain View Cemetery.


4. The Letterform Archive. Did you know that one of the world’s most complete collections of typographic ephemera, original artwork, and typeface specimens is here in San Francisco? Go see it.

What are you looking forward to with the future of typography?

For hundreds of years, type was arranged by typographers and set by typesetters: a narrow subset of design specialists with special equipment and special training. In this new era of self-publishing, suddenly everyone is a typographer. This is both scary and exciting. It brings new education challenges: for instance, basic terms like “type” are increasingly misused. (Hint: most of the signs and stone carving I mentioned above are all examples of lettering; stuff made with fonts is type.) The positive news is that this expansion of the craft engages specialists from other fields who haven’t had to think about type until now. People from diverse disciplines (like web design and engineering) are contributing all sorts of new ideas to typography.

Also, font jokes make more sense at a normal person party than they used to.

In anticipation of your talk on Wednesday, will you give us a teaser?

You will see how birdwatching is like fontspotting. You will learn how a chair is like a typeface. You will hear the sound Gill Sans makes.
 

We can’t wait to hear more from Stephen on Wednesday at our Working Late event in San Francisco. There will be food and drinks, typographic design talk and, probably, some font jokes. So, visit Eventbrite to grab a ticket if you haven’t already, and we’ll see you there.

4:37 PM Permalink

Adobe at Sundance Film Festival 2015

We’re at Sundance Film Festival 2015; check out what we’re up to:

A panel streaming LIVE: Blurring The Lines between Indie And Hollywood

On Friday January 23, Adobe will host a discussion on how technology is blurring the lines between indie and Hollywood filmmaking. Panelists include Rob Legato (Misery Loves Comedy, Sundance Film Festival 2015; The Wolf of Wall StreetHUGOAVATAR), Kyle Patrick Alvarez (The Stanford Prison Experiment, Sundance Film Festival 2015, C.O.G. Sundance Film Festival 2013, and Easier with Practice), and Dave Ginsberg, CTO of the Sundance Institute. Learn more and register for the LIVE streamed event: http://bit.ly/1tGTXNx

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A #SundanceSpotlight: Shining a light on the Sundance journey

Attendees are invited to create a quick video showing:

  • The moment you knew you wanted to be a filmmaker
  • What inspires you creatively
  • What brings you to Sundance

Include #SundanceSpotlight when sharing (publicly of course!) for a chance to be featured on Adobe social media channels. #SundanceSpotlight videos published from Adobe Premiere Clip may also be shown on special screens around Park City, and the in-app Community Feed.

The first 50 videos shared using #SundanceSpotlight will get a free 3-month Creative Cloud membership—so get started ASAP.

And films: Highlighting Adobe Creative Cloud workflows

Adobe is proud to report that 21 films debuting at Sundance Film Festival this year were edited with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Find the complete list below & stay tuned for more blog posts and video interviews with these filmmakers during the festival.

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Misery Loves Comedy (Special Events)—Kevin Pollak, director; Kevin Pollak and John Varhous, screenwriters
Do you have to be miserable to be funny? Children cry, “Hey, look at me,” but who turns that into a profession? Over 50 funny people, like Tom Hanks, Larry David, Jimmy Fallon, Judd Apatow, and Amy Schumer share pain-filled insights from a life in pursuit of laughter. World Premiere. Cast: Tom Hanks, Larry David, Amy Schumer, Jimmy Fallon, Judd Apatow, Jim Gaffigan.

The Stanford Prison Experiment (US Dramatic Competition)—Kyle Patrick Alvarez, director; Tim Talbott, screenwriter
Based on the actual events that took place in 1971, when Stanford professor Dr. Philip Zimbardo created what became one of the most shocking and famous social experiments of all time. Cast: Billy Crudup, Ezra Miller, Michael Angarano, Tye Sheridan, Johnny Simmons, Olivia Thirlby.

Advantageous (US Dramatic Competition)—Jennifer Phang, director; Jacqueline Kim and Jennifer Phang, screenwriters
In a near-future city where soaring opulence overshadows economic hardship, Gwen and her daughter, Jules, do all they can to hold on to their joy, despite the instability surfacing in their world. Cast: Jacqueline Kim, James Urbaniak, Freya Adams, Ken Jeong, Jennifer Ehle, Samantha Kim.

Being Evel (US Documentary Competition)—Daniel Junge, director
Millions know the man, but few know his story. Academy Award-winner Daniel Junge (Saving Face) and actor/producer Johnny Knoxville take a candid look at American daredevil and icon Robert “Evel” Knievel while reflecting on our voracious public appetite for heroes and spectacle.

Fresh Dressed (Documentary Premieres)—Sacha Jenkins, director
The history of hip-hop fashion from its birth in the South Bronx to its rise as a billion-dollar global industry, Fresh Dressed is supported by rich archival materials, in-depth interviews with individuals crucial to the evolution, and the outsiders who study and admire them.

Things of the Aimless Wanderer (New Frontier)—Kivu Ruhorahoza, director and screenwriter
A white man meets a black girl, then she disappears. The white man tries to understand what happened to her while also trying to finish a travelogue. Things of the Aimless Wanderer is a film about the sensitive topic of relations between “locals” and Westerners, and about paranoia, mistrust, and misunderstandings. Cast: Justin Mullikin, Grace Nikuze, Ramadhan Bizimana, Eliane Umuhire, Wesley Ruzibiza, Matt Ray Brown. World Premiere

Cop Car (Park City at Midnight)—Jon Watts, director; Christopher D. Ford and Jon Watts, screenwriters
Two ten-year-old boys steal an abandoned cop car. World Premiere. Cast: Kevin Bacon, James Freedson-Jackson, Hays Wellford, Shea Whigham, Camryn Manheim.

Short films

Every Day—Gabe Spitzer, director

Followers—Tim Marshall, director

Greenland—Oren Gerner, director

Hotel 22—Elizabeth Lo, director

Making it in America—Joris Debeij, director

OM Rider—Takeshi Murata, director

Palm Rot—Ryan Gillis, director

Papa Machette—Jonathan David Kane, director

Russian Roulette—Ben Aston, director

Symphony no. 42—Réka Bucsi, director

Storm hits jacket—Paul Cabon, director

The Sun Like a Big Dark Animal—Christina Felisgrau and Ronnie Rivera, directors

The Face of Ukraine: Casting Oksana Baiul—Kitty Green, director

The Collectors: Beekeeper—Steven Cantor, director
The Sundance Film Festival takes place January 22–February 1 in Park City, Utah. Check the Sundance Film Festival website for the schedule and theatre listings.

Learn more about the Pro Video Tools in Adobe Creative Cloud.

11:20 AM Permalink

Do not disturb. New creative at work.

We’ve all been there… That moment when your creative juices are flowing and the magic is happening and then, suddenly, you just lose your groove.

We all have at least one well-intentioned colleague/family member/cat who doesn’t pick up on the subtle signs of head down, headphones on, serious face, keys flying, mouse clicking getting-it-done work mode.

While we can’t guarantee this will work on your cat (unless it’s really, really smart), we developed some door hangers that might just help keep your creative mode operational in the near future.

For those working on making the world picture perfect:
 
DoorHanger_1



AI | PDF
 

For those striving for the deep satisfaction of inbox zero:
 
DoorHanger_2



AI | PDF
 

For the designer making the next thing we’ll appreciate on Behance:
 
DoorHanger_3



AI | PDF
 

For the web developer whose logic stream refuses to be broken:
 
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AI | PDF
 

For those making the next big Hollywood feature or YouTube video featuring their really, really smart cat:
 
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AI | PDF
 

Download, print, cut and hang these in plain sight of all creativity disturbers.

Once you’ve done that and can work in peace, mock up your own door hanger using Creative Cloud and share it with us online using #CCDoorHanger.

We look forward to seeing what you create!

12:20 PM Permalink

From Adobe Ideas to Adobe Illustrator Draw: Making The Switch

For quite some time, designer/illustrator Brian Yap has integrated mobile art applications into his professional creative workflow… His mobile app of choice? Adobe Ideas. He’s used the full-featured vector app to capture illustrative concepts, develop them, and later move them to Adobe Illustrator CC for fine-tuning. It’s led to a successful creative process and an identifiable Ideas-to-Illustrator illustration style.

Like many Adobe Ideas users, Brian recently made the switch to Adobe Illustrator Draw. After Brian’s Adobe MAX sessions (What’s New in Adobe Ideas and Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps), we asked him to share some of his initial thoughts about making the move. Here’s what he had to say:

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

Adobe Ideas was the most powerful vector drawing tool for the iPad, and it changed the way I thought about the device as a professional tool. Adobe Illustrator Draw is a continuing evolution of Ideas, and proves that the development team is listening and reacting to the community in way unheard of when it comes to graphics applications. Use it. Love it. Become part of its future development.

Of course I always have the immediate reaction, “Why does this thing I love need to change?” But it didn’t take long to fall in love again; besides some amazing enhancements to the drawing engine that I’ve grown to love, the UI has been totally designed with a lot of user feedback taken into account.

Overall, pretty much every time I panicked a bit because a feature I depended on seemed to be taken out, I not only found it a few seconds later, but quickly realized the thinking that went into the redesign. A few thoughts:

While the tools are generally the same, the icons are way more descriptive of what the tools actually do (something I always wondered about with Ideas). As an example, I always thought it was a bit confusing to have a pencil icon for a tool that didn’t have a pencil texture.

There were some cuts made to the tools but with a little trial it’s easy to see why: The “long press” while using a tool was always the same as the paint bucket so the paint bucket tool itself was somewhat unnecessary. Although I was always in the camp of the “long press” I imagine people who relied heavily on the paint bucket will find that change a bit tricky at first.

I like that the Gallery interface is in line with the other new apps that take more advantage of the connection to Behance and the Creative Cloud.

By far the biggest change is in the layers options; Draw is much more focused on the options for each layer. In Ideas, I was constantly merging layers I didn’t mean to merge. Now that the options are reached through touching the layer options icon on each layer, it’s always clear which layer is being affected. One tip: The merge down button is now under the icon that covers flipping the layer.

Finally, based on what I’ve heard, there is some concern about the lack of PDF export… I’ve been told that the option will be added back in a future update.

 

We’ve asked Brian to keep us updated about his Draw discoveries, so stay tuned to Adobe Drawing on Twitter and Facebook. And for a few tips about syncing Adobe Ideas files to Creative Cloud, Adobe Ideas: A Transformation is a quick read.

10:22 AM Permalink

The BULLY Project Mosaic: Art for A Movement

Bully_1_FinalMosaicAdobe partnered recently with Lee Hirsch, the filmmaker behind the 2012 documentary BULLY, to evangelize his anti-bullying movement The BULLY Project.

The embodiment of the partnership is the No Bully Mosaic. Created by sixteen Behance artists from around the world, who worked independently to create one unified piece, it’s an expression of how community and commitment can change the world.

It, and an accompanying website, The BULLY Project Mural, an ever-changing digital mural to which people can contribute artwork and stories, were donated to Lee’s organization earlier this month at Adobe MAX.

Watch Lee’s powerful Adobe MAX presentation about this global human rights issue and how he’s affecting change for children around the world. Then read the comments, alongside the art, of the artists who contributed to this unique work:

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The Eyes, Amr Elshamy (Cairo, Egypt)

“I’ve been bullied all my life but art was there for me so I’ve worked hard to develop art that can speak for me and to others.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? When I watched the movie I had this deep feeling that I had to be part of it.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? It was both. I was bullied by other kids in school because I was overweight and was hurt deeply by it. I contributed to this artwork with mixed, really personal, feelings about the negative aspects of bullying.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? I’ve had to skip days of school because of other kids and art always there for me. I have great feelings about the power of art and about this movement.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? It’s amazing. Every other piece touched my soul somehow.

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Paul Trillo (Brooklyn, New York)

“Sometimes the only escape from depression is to let your imagination take you somewhere else. As a kid, I would look to the night sky to let my mind wander.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? As cruel as the Internet can be, it can also be equally uplifting and powerful. I was happy to contribute toward something positive that could outweigh some of the negativity that is prevalent online; I was excited to see how I could be a part of something larger with some incredibly talented artists. I was bullied when I was younger, and using that emotional history as a springboard for a creative concept came naturally to me. Plus I was just excited to see how I could be a part of something larger with some incredibly talented artists.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? I was fascinated by stars and astronomy as a kid. I’m not sure exactly why, perhaps because it felt so far away it was a form of escape, but I was easily hypnotized by staring into the sky. It allowed me to take my mind off things at school especially if I was being bullied. I’ve also had a knack for creating cosmic imagery as of late so this was another excuse to keep moving in that direction.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? The best thing that could come of this, is that it inspires someone to go out and create something. The biggest reward for creating work is when motivating someone else to go create. I hope it also spawns a new type of collective—Internet-sourced artists. I discovered a bunch of amazing artists through this project; by doing more communal things such as this we can all help each other get seen.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? I had no idea what other people would do, so each and every piece surpassed my level of expectation. I was very impressed overall with everyone’s ability to output something of such high quality and production in such a short time. My favorite pieces are Mike Terpestra’s The Bus Stop and Mark Gmehling’s Social Racism, which both feel honest and capture a narrative with incredible simplicity.

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Keep Ya Head Up, Leonardo Betti (Florence, Italy)

“There’s the necessity to keep your head up, to hug people and spread love; true love will give you a colorful and strong feedback that generates beauty.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? The trailer was so powerful and at the same time it reminded me of dark childhoods events.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? I have childhood memories about friends who were victims of bullying. I was a victim too when I was eleven. With my art I tried to emphasize how bullying makes you blind and shy, makes you feel alone. But if you lose the fear, and keep your head up, you discover people who love you and give you the force to overcome the bad vibes that result from bullying.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? I think that the force of creativity and art is really powerful. It can fight physical violence using beauty and win. And this movement is great. I hope it grows to involve more and more talented creatives and artists.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? I felt so happy and at the same time surprised by how different styles and techniques could connect to become one strong and immersive piece. I really liked the aesthetic and the concept of Helping Hands by Coming Soon.

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Statue, Christian Bergheim, Anti (Bergen, Norway)

“Bullying isn’t always physical or violent, it can also be about treating someone like air; our artwork is inspired by statues—a metaphor for not being treated like a person.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? Being invited to the project was an honour and, after reading about the cause, the movie and the entire project, we simply couldn’t pass on the opportunity.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? Our piece is not inspired by any specific episode or memory, it´s more of an interpretation of some of the general aspects of bullying.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? Making yourself heard and your voice count is easier now than ever before, and the web has given people a tool for communication that is completely unprecedented in human history. A single voice can literally change the world, and designers and artists can play a vital role in getting important messages across more clearly and reach out even further. I´m hoping we´ll see visual communicators and creatives teaming up with activists a lot more in the future.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? Honoured and in good company.

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Spiral, Pablo Álvarez Vinagre (Brighton, United Kingdom)

“‘I am starting to think I don’t feel anymore.’ —Alex Libby. Inside a spiral of chaos and pain, our mind builds up a shield that makes us impervious to anything coming from the outside. At the end this shield is destroying us, as we are decomposing inside our entrapped thoughts.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? As a designer I sometimes wonder if my work has an effect on people, so, when I had the opportunity to participate in this project I didn’t think twice. If I can contribute to such an important cause doing what I know best, it would be absurd not to do it.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? Fortunately I have not suffered bullying, but I can understand the pain of the many children who have suffered or are currently suffering it. I think we all have a general understanding of the negative impact of bullying, and therefore we must do our maximum to put an end to it.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? That we can help to express the voice of many people. Communication is a powerful weapon and, therefore, so is art.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? Seeing the full mosaic, I saw sixteen completely different styles expressing the same message. No matter where we come from, or our context, if we all move in the same direction we can change that which we propose to change—and that’s not limited to design or any other art field.

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The Bus Stop, Mike Terpstra (Oakland, California)

“With this piece, beyond documenting a specific childhood memory, I hoped to evoke the feelings of loss, upheaval, and fear that bullying unnecessarily introduces into a child’s life.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? I was contacted by Cindy Yep at Adobe with an invitation to pitch an idea for the BULLY Project Mural. The catch was… it was due the following day. I was in my final week of a long project at work, and I was considering not contributing based on the time it was going to take to come up with a quality idea and a decent image for the pitch. The thing that convinced me was watching the trailer for BULLY.  I brainstormed a few ideas, and decided to pitch something personal.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? It was. I have one (only one, because the punishment that followed curbed my behavior) regretful memory from my early childhood. I was the bully. I remember pushing a neighborhood kid around one morning because he didn’t bring his toys to the bus stop like he said he was going to do; he ended up going home and missing the bus that day. His mom got in touch with my parents, who had zero tolerance for that kind of behavior.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement?  I’ve recently become more aware of how apathy and inaction can be overcome with dynamic art. I finished work on the new TV series Cosmos earlier this year (an incredible experience) and a few critics of the series took issue with the need to add such “flashy” and “Hollywood-style” visual effects. Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Seth Macfarlane both understood the show would have both greater impact and reach a much broader audience if the science was presented in a dynamic way. The series was both successful and impactful while effectively communicating an important message, in much the same way the BULLY Project Mural is doing for the issue of bullying.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? I was expecting to see some good pieces, but honestly, I was blown away by the mosaic. I’m quite honored to have a piece nestled among such talent. I’ve examined each of them, and they spoke to me in different ways, which is the beauty of art.  I love the diversity represented in the mosaic—the artistic styles and the message each artist wanted to convey.

Bully_8_AdrianAndGidiCheck, Adrian Woods / Gidi van Maarseveen, Adrian & Gidi (Brighton, United Kingdom)

“A single chess piece against many opponents on an abstract chessboard. Showing the overwhelming inequality of bullying in the unpredictable environment of growing up.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? Because of some personal experiences in the past we could really identify with The BULLY Project and the stories on the website. So when Adobe approached us about the mural artwork, and we started to look into Lee Hirsch’s work, we knew straight away that we wanted to get involved and spread the word.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? Our artwork is based on the general understanding of the negative impact. That being said, our personal experience of being bullied and the stories we read on Lee Hirsch’s website, certainly played a part in formulating the concept. We wanted to portray the feeling of being cornered and overpowered, but leaving the subject or experience open to interpretation.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement?  We hope for it to strengthen the movement. It would be amazing if a lot of people joined in, spreading the message through art.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? It was great to see all the artworks from different artists and designers from around the globe click into each other to form a single piece of art. Visually we love the work of Karan Singh, and conceptually the work from Coming Soon.

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Blindness, Valentin Leonida (Montréal, Canada)

“In a world of beauty, the bully wants to control everything. He wants to convert each potential victim to a trophy and, for this, he offers generously his venom. In his soul the hate is stronger than love. But he is not pure evil, he is just blind…”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? I was very glad to work for The BULLY Project and I hope that the message of the movie can be heard… Everybody feels that something is wrong but nobody reacts. The documentary reveals that fact and if people see the movie they will understand that we are all involved in this. Our ignorance generates violence and suffering.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? I am very new to North America. I come from a different culture—more precisely from Romania—and I remember clearly the years of childhood when the violence experienced by young people was something “normal.” Like a path of initiation. After all, the entire population was under the pressure of a Communist regime and children are the last link in this absurd chain. Fear became a very effective tool to cut any open wings. I saw how parents accepted the wounds of their children because they all believe that this is a growing process. So everyone had clipped wings. Over the long term it creates a society based on pain and fear.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? It’s a beginning. We still live in a time of madness. It’s unacceptable to have fights and conflicts in a world with such a high level of cultural and technological achievement. I dream that one day the walls of great cities will become open pages of culture and enlightenment. We must accept that the only tool to fight against violence is culture—an active culture. Because they have the power, large companies should promote ideas not products. I hope that this project will touch hearts and begin to change the collective mentality.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? Like a bee contemplating a honeycomb. I enjoy the idea of synchronicity in art whereby artists keep their personal vision and sensibility. Each piece is interesting. It’s hard to choose one because the mediums are very different (photography, installation, animation, 3D); the most important thing is that we now have a participatory art mosaic.

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Social Racism, Mark Gmehling (Dortmund, Germany)

“Bullying is a variant of racism based on social status driven by group dynamics. The most uneducated are leading a mob of labile followers terrorizing persons not fitting their frame.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? My own experiences in school. I wasn’t punished physically but I remember the strange group dynamics that were tolerated or perceived as cool. You ask yourself if you want to confront a majority and socialize with the victims because it feels right, but you’re unconfident yourself. Simply: It’s important to talk about bullying.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? In my case it was more a general understanding of the situation that I wanted to visualize. Bullying is an awful social dynamic we all know on the big scale. The biggest problem is that the terrorized kids get tired of living,  too young to understand that their fate is caused by the missing courage and/or bad breeding of the mob.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement?  That the visual activists get the needed attention and recognition to keep rolling.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? It felt good being able to contribute to this important subject because I’m sure it helps and encourages people (and kids) to support each other more. Conceptually I really like the work of Amr Elshamy, that depicts the challenge of the children who have to face their fears again every single day. I want to whisper, “Stay brave, stay strong. You are not alone.” as Alberto Seveso said in his great work.

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Dark & Light, Gastón Pacheco (Mendoza, Argentina)

“The main concept of my piece is Contrast; a lighter and friendly area where coexistence, empathy, harmony, and color stand over broken, fragile and crushed symbolic elements dispersed in darkness.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? Since the moment I was contacted to get involved with The BULLY Project, it seemed very interesting to me. I got really excited with the idea of a collective contribution to a noble cause, and of many points of view captured in a single work.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? What I expressed is not from a specific memory, although it was created with the load not only of having suffered it partially when I was in secondary school, but also of being witness to so many other people suffering it.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement?  I think the most important is to expand the consciousness about the influence of bullying in our lives. It shapes our lives, so it shouldn’t be ignored.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? The mosaic radiates effort, dedication, and compromise toward the subject. Even so, what I liked the most was to see the way in which many people joined The BULLY Project Mural after the mosaic was finished… contributing to the cause.  One of the works that impacted me is Mike Terpstra’s The Bus Stop and his memories of bullying someone else. It made me think a lot of how unconscious we are to the acts we carry out in different stages of our lives; we often don’t know why we do what we do. I think that the awareness needs to take into account both parts equally—the bullied and the bully—because both are part of the problem.

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All Sorts, Karan Singh (New York, New York)

“My response is based on the notion of acceptance and celebrating differences. My goal was to use differing patterns and colors on confectionery, an inseparable part of childhood, as a visual metaphor.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? I admire that the documentary draws long overdue attention to an often underestimated and unaddressed aspect of growing up.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? Though I definitely experienced my fair share of bullying, my approach was more about embracing the positive impact of the documentary. I liked the idea of acceptance and embracing differences… and it’s what I hoped to convey in my tile.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? I’d hope that as a result there’s more of an acknowledgment and dialogue on the issue that, ideally, would result in less of a stigma in speaking up.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? I was pretty stoked and I think the idea of a mosaic aligns well with BULLY‘s message. There’s something powerful and empowering about working collaboratively to make something big.

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Helping Hands, Jim Van Raemdonck, Coming Soon (Wetteren, Belgium)

“Protect something precious. Helping hands viewed almost as a statue trying to help. White is the colour of hope and symbolizes that we all have to work together to solve the problem of bullying.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? Adobe asked us if we would be interested in creating some artwork. Bullies don’t realise that what they do when they’re kids can influence someone for life. It’s a serious problem for the victims and this project brings it into the spotlight in a way that makes it difficult to ignore.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? We saw it more like a symbol, a sign that we all have to work together to protect those who are bullied. The hands protect something precious, something golden.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? That it’s a sign. That now is the time for things to change.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? It’s a really nice concept. It’s surprising that this piece is made by different artists all over the world who never met each other and never saw the other pieces… yet when you put it together, it tells a powerful story.

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Tell, Gregory Barbot (Nantes, France)

“The word “Tell,” composed of bubbly letters stands out from the word “Hell,” composed of graffiti letters. The use of speech can break down the cycle of violence and its dramatic consequences.”

What made you want to get involved with Lee Hirsch’s BULLY Project? When Adobe asked me to create an artwork on the theme of bullying I hadn’t heard about The BULLY Project in France. But when I looked at the trailer, I found it really important to get involved because bullying is unfortunately an international issue.

Was your art based on a specific bullying memory? Or a more general understanding of the negative impact of it? Although I witnessed bullying during my childhood, my art isn’t based on a personal experience, but I’m a father now and I worry about it. As Lee Hirsch demonstrated during his Adobe MAX keynote, it’s a subject that should concern everyone.

The visual activism of designers and artists can shape culture. What’s your hope for this movement? I hope that we will help to spread the message all over the world. Solidarity and caring for each other is the basis of humanity. This problem is universal and we have to avoid tragedies among us, especially when children are involved.

How did you feel when you saw the completed mosaic? Was there another piece that really touched you? I really like the final art. It shows the depth of the subject how it affects every artist differently. Every piece is different (concept, medium, and graphic treatment); despite that, the work as a whole shows a strong unity.

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Taijitu, Yovcho Gorchev (Mendoza, Argentina)

“A portrait of an innocent fictional character, captured in a dreamlike state. Her face, illuminated by the physically burned area, serves as a visual metaphor for the willpower to erase and oppose negative memories and actions; to find the strength and courage in one’s own inner self.”


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Alex, Alberto Seveso (Bristol, United Kingdom)

From Lucius Annaeus Seneca’s Of a Happy Life, Book XXVII: “I offer myself to all attacks, like some lonely rock in a shallow sea, which the waves never cease to beat upon from whatever quarter they may come, but which they cannot thereby move from its place nor yet wear away, for however many years they may unceasingly dash against it. Bound upon me, rush upon me, I will overcome you by enduring your onset: whatever strikes against that which is firm and unconquerable merely injures itself by its own violence.”


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Into Ashes, Flora Borsi (Budapest, Hungary)

“Inspired by my childhood, I wanted to do something dramatic… This photo-manipulation depicts the essence of the destructive nature of verbal aggression.”

9:56 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud: New Features + New Mobile Apps = New Tutorials

At Adobe MAX 2014 the Creative Cloud Learn team launched more than 40 new tutorials to help members learn new features and updated techniques.

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Hi everyone!

It’s been a big week for the Creative Cloud Learn team. Many of us were lucky enough to be at MAX, where we were able to meet many of our customers, both in labs and at the Adobe Booth in the Pavilion. Additionally, on Monday, Adobe released major updates to Creative Cloud’s desktop apps along with new mobile apps. All of these new features are covered in over 40 new tutorials. Some of the highlights:

  • How to get started with Creative Cloud Libraries—Browse and access your favorite creative assets (colors, type styles, graphics, brushes, and more) in new libraries that sync to Creative Cloud and are available in Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe Photoshop CC, and many of the new mobile apps.
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  • Extract overview—Easily extract optimized image assets from layers and save them to various formats and resolutions, including SVG, using the Extract PSD assets workflow. This feature is also integrated with Creative Cloud on the web and with Adobe Dreamweaver CC. The feature will be a huge timesaver for designers and developers who use a comp-to-code workflow. See for yourself; check out Extract a Photoshop design into code in Dreamweaver.
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  • Add interactivity to fixed layout EPUBs—Enhance fixed layout EPUBs with hyperlinks, slideshows, animations, and triggering buttons that you have created directly in Adobe InDesign CC.
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  • Join and trim paths—Second only to the Surface Pro giveaway, the demo of Illustrator CC’s  Join tool drew the loudest applause during the MAX Day 1 Keynote!
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  • We also deployed over 60 tutorials to support Photoshop CC’s new Welcome screen. After upgrading, start Photoshop CC and take a few minutes to navigate through this panel  that presents videos based on the features you use. I think you’ll like what you see.

 

Many, many people put in a lot of hours and hard work on this and I want to take a minute to acknowledge them:

  • I’d like to thank all of our presenters, in particular, Matt Pizzi, Dan Carr, Laura Shoe, Curt Fukuda, and the folks at Infinite Skills. They all put in extra effort to make sure we got things right.
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  • Also, I want to thank my editorial team: Amy Hope, Erick Vera, Karla Milosevich, Rita Amladi, Maile Valentine, Stefan Gruenwedel, Michael Salinero, Hemanth Sharma, Ray Camden, and Jill Merlin did an awesome job and I can’t thank them enough.
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  • We talk a lot about design-led innovation, and Luanne Seymour’s design team makes it happen: Chelsea Allen, Erica Larson, Janelle Flores, Michael Jarrott, Kendall Plant, Laura Kersell, Amanda Gross Tuft, Julia Grummel, and Alec Malloy are all awesome
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  • Other major contributors include Robin Maccan, Mally Gardiner, Daniel Taborga, Jenn Clark, Viv Moses, Kirsti Aho, Serena Fox, Craig Goodman, Michelle Yaiser, George Fox, Christine Yarrow, Quinn Warble, Diane Catt, Ed Sullivan, and of course, Ben Forta.

Huge apologies if I’ve forgotten anyone; this was a real team effort.

Most of our pages link to surveys or forums, so please let us know what you think.

—Randy

11:29 AM Permalink