Adobe Systems Incorporated

I AM THE NEW CREATIVE

Art directors are becoming animators. Print designers are becoming web designers. Illustrators are also photographers and editors who also shoot film. They are the New Creatives, and we are celebrating their work.

With the Creative Cloud our product teams have removed the barriers to creative expression: Designers can build parallax HTML5 experiences. Illustrators are making EPUBs. Photographers are using their cameras and Adobe technology to become filmmakers. And coders have the tools to make beautiful design.

It’s an amazing and interesting time in our industry; people have the ability to self-express, in any discipline, without boundaries. I Am The New Creative promotes the amazing work our community is producing and marks this moment in time as a movement and a celebration of creativity.

One of the most incredible aspects of this program has been watching creative professionals merge their mediums and their portraits to produce “New Creatives” versions of themselves.

There’s something magical about the compositions. As a designer there’s always a part of me in my work, but to personalize my work in this way, to make my work more representative of me, presents an alternative perspective. All of the artists we’re working with are enjoying this experience and are appreciative of our desire to promote their amazing creative output.

Our new site highlights the New Creatives, their disciplines, their work, and their stories.

Visitors to the site can join us and become New Creatives (submissions are made through Behance and curated by our team); we’ll be choosing a number of artists and celebrating them and their work throughout our social properties and on Adobe.com during the coming year.

 

site-1024x844

Be sure to check out the work of the New Creatives, get inspired, and join us.

AJ

Graphic Designer / Executive Creative Director / Maker of things

 

 

 

4:00 PM Permalink

EMC Design Joins Creative Cloud

eMC_Design

Update: October 18, 2013: A few months ago we welcomed emc design to Creative Cloud for teams. Take a look and see how they’re benefiting now:

Welcome to Creative Cloud, emc design (@emcdesignltd). This UK-based design shop recently announced on their blog that they’ve signed up for Creative Cloud for teams. In their post, they list several of the features that are helping them streamline their workflow and create even better work.

As you can see, not even a burglary has kept them from producing top-notch work, thanks to CC. Here are just some of the advantages that emc design laid out in their post:

  • Every staff member is granted access to all of the Creative Cloud applications from anywhere, which increases flexibility for remote working and gives people the option of working at home when deadlines are tight. Because pulling an all-nighter is a lot better when you can do it in your sweatpants, on your couch, with real food, instead of in a dark office with only cold pizza and vending machine snacks to munch on.
  • emc staff has access to the latest creative tools, which lets them experiment more and push their creative boundaries. No more waiting for the newest tool, only to see your competition get it first.
  • We’ve all lost valuable time, or even missed deadlines, due to IT issues. But with CC, administrators at emc can easily manage licenses and install applications – case in point, after their office was burglarized, they were able to quickly re-install Creative Cloud on 5 new Macs and keep producing their best work without skipping a beat.

We’re excited to work with emc design. So stay tuned for more updates spotlighting this great shop, here and on our Facebook and Twitter channels.

2:20 PM Permalink

Eames Remix Winners

To coincide with the launch of the new Creative Cloud apps, we paid tribute to the late, great Charles Eames by hosting our own Eames’ Chair Remix contest. The task: take the iconic Eames chair and using Adobe products (Illustrator and Photoshop) personalize a digital version and share it with us and the Behance community.

Among the impressive and creative entries we received (check them all out below), we’re excited to announce that ANDESIGN is our grand prize winner and will be receiving an Eames Molded Plastic Dowel-Leg Armchair, one year membership to Creative Cloud and an Eames poster for his impressive “Eames Nest” design.

Eames_Chair

Also, did you know that we put six top designers to the test as well? See what impressive designs they came up with.

A big thanks to everyone who participating. For more fun, news, tips and tricks, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. You won’t be disappointed.

All Eames’ Chair Remix Entries:

1:17 PM Permalink

Creative Spotlight: Leandro Erlich’s Reflective Optical Illusion House

Looking at a normal object in a different way helps creatives bring a fresh perspective to everyday items. The Argentinian artist Leandro Elrich did just that in his piece titled “Dalston House,” turning a house on its side.

The piece uses a wall of giant mirrors, which reflects against a huge horizontal print of a Victorian terraced house. Visitors are then free to climb and jump around on the print of the house, which is reflected in the mirror above. Visitors hang from windows, skateboard along ledges, and crawl along walls in this optical illusion.

Visitors get creative with Erlich’s optical illusion, titled “Dalston House.” (Image courtesy of the Barbican)

Visitors get creative with Erlich’s optical illusion, titled “Dalston House.” (Image courtesy of the Barbican)

If you’re in London, be sure to check it out now through August 4, 2013. Check out the full article on Colossal. Also keep an eye on our blog, Twitter and Facebook for more spotlights on creative projects.

4:10 PM Permalink

Creative Spotlight on Creative Cloud Logo Redesign Artists Erik Johansson

When you think of a common hobby, you often think of photography. Popular, yes, but there are a few creatives that go above and beyond. They see the world through a unique lens and produce stellar pieces of work. Photographer Erik Johansson (@tackochgodnatt) is an individual who takes photography and flips it on its head. Don’t believe us? For starters, check out the Creative Cloud logo he reimagined below.

FB_Cover_CC_Photo_Cloud

If there is anyone who can create surreal images, but captured in a realistic way, it’s Erik. A native to Sweden currently living in Berlin, Erik has the luxury of having two distinct environments at his fingertips to inspire and capture some amazing photographs. Berlin, described by Erik as a “hip place,” has a large photo and art community, which enables him to be surrounded by other creatives. When he is in search for unique landscapes and scenes, he heads home to Sweden.

After receiving his first digital camera at age 15, he wanted to do something above and beyond with photography. It was then he discovered photo manipulation. Combining his love for drawing and photography, Erik would begin a project with a sketch, shoot some photos, and then head into post production using his tools of choice, Photoshop and Lightroom. Having these tools and more at his disposal with Creative Cloud has enabled him to do anything.

Want to learn more about this photography master? Get a behind the scenes look at how Erik produces some of the most unique creations in the world in the video below. Also, follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more news, tutorials and more surrounding photography.

 

Erik on the web:

Website
Facebook
Twitter
Blog

8:43 AM Permalink

7 Ways to Boost Your Creativity

You’ve hit a brick wall. It’s difficult to concentrate. Social media sites and emails are suddenly demanding your attention. The ideas just aren’t coming today. Has this happened to you?

It’s difficult to get into the creative process when you can’t focus and feel surrounded by distractions. Luckily, Behance’s 99u blog broke down seven ways to boost your creativity to help you get in the zone.

Here’s a few of our favorites:

Separate work from consumption
Instead of gathering information while completing a project, keep these tasks separate to focus on the creative process in its own step. Absorb all of the information first, and then create.

Restrict yourself
Putting limits on a project can prove to be beneficial to your creativity. Instead of attacking a task like you normally would, consider adding a time limit or size limit to encourage you think about it in a different way.

Stay Positive
Influencing your mood in a positive way can actually have an impact on your ability to think outside of the box. Quick exercise or recalling good memories might help you find your positive place.

Be sure to check out the full list at 99u.

What quick tips do you use to boost your creativity?

CC_burst

7:04 PM Permalink

Creative Spotlight on Creative Cloud Logo Redesign Artists Vasava

Imagine a design studio. You’ll most likely default to thinking of a cool, hip office filled with tons of creative individuals. Now take that concept and turn it on its head. What do you end up with? The design studio that re-imagined our Creative Cloud logo, Vasava Studios.

FB_Cover_CC_Design_Cloud

Far from a traditional design studio, Vasava does not specialize in anything. In fact, they like to experiment. Each member has the taste for the unexpected and selects projects that may test their creative abilities. Enric Godes states it best when he says, “It’s not a money driving company, but a company driven by passion.” Top that off with a balance between old school and new school styles of design coming together (there is a father/son duo working at Vasava) and you have one of the most unique studios ever.

Bruno Sellés, a partner at Vasava Studios, believes inspiration happens outside of the office. Once he hits the streets of Barcelona, inspiration strikes and his creative process takes off. Creative Cloud plays a huge roll here, because it gives everyone the ability to create wherever. Having the ability to begin a project on Adobe Ideas while commuting to work, uploading it to the cloud and then further refining and finalizing in Illustrator in the studio really opened Bruno’s eyes to how Creative Cloud has taken creativity to a whole new level.

Take a virtual tour of Vasava Studios, meet the team and more by checking out the videos below. Also, follow us on Facebook and Twitter to curb your hunger for all things design.

 

Vasava on the web:

Website
Facebook
Twitter

4:08 PM Permalink

Creative Spotlight on Creative Cloud Logo Redesign Artists Dvein

As we take some time to focus on video production, we wanted to spotlight individuals who are masters of all things animation, our Creative Cloud logo redesign artists Dvein.

TW_Background_CC_Video_Cloud1

Based out of Barcelona, Dvein is not your run of the mill production and design firm. They are a collective of three directors who love animation, design, and all things creative. Fernando Dominquez, Creative Director for Dvein, defined it best when he said, “It’s a factory of all the things that you can imagine.”

Creative Cloud assists the creative minds at Dvein in each and every step in their creative process. Beginning with initial sketches, they utilize Photoshop to take their ideas to a whole new level. Then, they use the power of Premier Pro or After Effects when they are ready to turn creations into animations.

The icing on the cake; Behance integration in Creative Cloud enables Dvein to better expose themselves to the design community and connect with international clients.

Get to know the FX pros that make up Dvein by checking out the videos below, and be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more video production news, tutorials, inspirational work and more.

 

Dvein:The Vein ‘Magma’

Dvein on the web:

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Blog

12:13 PM Permalink

Creative Spotlight: McFarland & Pecci on Creative Cloud

Twisted, dark and awesome. Three words that describe the work of the creative team and visual artists that make up McFarland & Pecci. Still relatively new Creative Cloud members, these fellas have wasted no time utilizing the broad range of tools and programs to create one-of-a-kind work. A documentary film for well-known “metal core” band, Killswitch Engage? They’ve done it. High concept cover art for the Boston Phoenix? Sure. See what we mean about twisted, dark and awesome?

We engaged in a lightning round Q&A session with them to get more details on why Creative Cloud works for them. The diverse amount of products offered, the seamless syncing, constant updates, and bug fixes are just a few reasons why this duo takes creativity to a whole new level.

Adobe: Describe a project you are currently working on or have completed with Creative Cloud.

McFarland & Pecci: We signed up for Creative Cloud a few months ago and jumped right into a few projects with Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Photoshop. McFarland & Pecci is a creative team of directors and visual artists. We create everything from high concept photo shoots to feature films and documentaries. The past few months have kept us busy in post-production on the new Killswitch Engage documentary called “New Awakening”, the new music video for CZARFACE featuring Inspectah Deck from Wu-Tang, one of the final high concept covers for the Boston Phoenix, and an upcoming “double secret” comic book film.

What was your inspiration behind the project?

We love to tell stories, and we tend to be drawn to darker subject matter and artists that are obsessed with their craft.  The film on Killswitch Engage was a fun project that allowed us to focus on the guys as a family unit and we kept our gear tight and our crew small. The CZARFACE video is deeply rooted in our love for Grindhouse flicks and Shaw Brothers films, and the ‘End of the World’ photo shoot was completely influenced by the epic magic of Michael Bay!

How has the Creative Cloud changed your creative workflow?

We switched to Premiere Pro to simplify our workflow. Plain and simple. We shot CZARFACE with the RED EPIC in 5K with Hawk anamorphic lenses.  The piece required a lot of compositing in After Effects and color grading. The fact that I could bring the raw files right into my timeline and directly export to After Effects made our lives so much easier. A competitor’s program has really dropped the ball when it comes to professional editing these days so we were looking for a smart move. Just the time saved by not having to transcode footage from the RED and/or DSLRs was enough of a reason to make the jump to Premiere Pro.

What tools specific to Creative Cloud enable you to work more efficiently?

As mentioned earlier, all the new benefits of Premier Pro were our big draw in the video side of things, but the new version of Photoshop and its retouching tools and amazing smart layers really helped us composite these giant “End of the World” files. We have always been Adobe fans in one way or another, but having it all in one spot really helps us.  The cloud helps us keep both systems identical in our edit bays, and the constant updates have fixed a lot of software bugs already.

Describe your style of work in three words

Really F$#Kin Awesome!

Fill in the blank: I couldn’t create without _________.

Our twisted minds and the tools that can keep up with them.

What advice would you give to an individual who is considering Creative Cloud?

If you are a video editor, make the jump to Premier Pro.  Just do it. Creative Cloud is the smart choice; you sign up and download everything you need. It even runs on two systems. Makes having a post house a lot easier.

Dig their work? Check out Mcfarland & Pecci on Facebook, visit our website to see more films – www.mcfarlandandpecci.com – or follow directors @MikePecci and @Ian_McFarland on Twitter for behind the scenes content and tutorials.

10:38 AM Permalink

Q&A with Adobe MAX Speaker karlssonwilker

Fearless and wildly creative design duo Hjalti Karlsson and Jan Wilker—also known as karlssonwilker—are an independent and internationally-recognized creative force. When we met them, we were so charmed that we immediately wanted to introduce them to you, so we asked them to speak at Adobe MAX this year! Karlsson and Wilker’s topic, “Creativity, Technology, and karlssonwilker” speaks to their commitment, passion and creativity, as well as the equal importance they place on technology and play in their work.

Attend MAX. Attend their session. You’ll leave inspired. In the meantime, enjoy this candid Q&A (and their reinterpretation of the MAX logo) from these imaginative designers.

karlssonwilker

Adobe: You and Hjalti founded karlssonwilker in 2000, after working for Stefan Sagmeister, what was his advice to you when you told him you were opening your own studio?

karlssonwilker: There was no particular parting advice, although we surely asked him for advise many times, and still do from time to time. Back then it felt like a very natural transition. Stefan went on his sabbatical and so the two of us started, or were forced to start, our own “thing.” I remember the two of us showing Stefan the office space we were thinking about renting, and him saying it’s a great deal and that we should definitely take it. (We still are in the same space today.) The biggest thing, for me personally, was that he showed us—and everyone else—that a studio small in size could make hugely influential and relevant work, something quite uncommon back then. 

As if opening a new studio during a recession wasn’t enough, you decided to write a book (tellmewhy: The First 24 Months of a New York Design Company) about those first two years in business. Why did you take that on at that time?

One part was frustration about our unpreparedness regarding the business side of our new enterprise. The other was the need we felt, at the time, for more honesty in the arena of shiny design monographs. The simple story of the humble beginnings of a studio should be told, not the idealized and romanticized look back on 20 years of a successful design career, where everyone seemed to be born a genius. That’s what we did and to this day we still get emails from around the world thanking us for doing this candid book and helping designers around the world not feel they are alone in being ill-prepared to properly run a studio right from the start. And of course Princeton Architectural Press deserves huge credit of course for working on it with us, as does Clare Jacobson for writing it so fantastically. 

Your book offers a not-always-glamorous view of owning a design studio; do you think it’s important for students and young designers to know that the path to success is not always rosy?

Yes, of course. Its important to make clear that failing is part of the “fun” and an important part of the learning. Somehow this book led by example: if Hjalti and I can do it, anyone can. And that seemed to be empowering to many. 

If tomorrow, you could no longer be a designer, what would you choose to do?

I would be a shoemaker.  Hjalti would run a little store, or be “in real estate.”

Has Adobe’s Creative Cloud changed/altered your work and your process?

Adobe products have always had a huge influence on us and there are many examples in our work. One of our design approaches is rooted in play and experimentation; very early on we used Illustrator’s tools and filters to explore dense vector drawings, by spending lots of time with it to see where it would lead us (projects like Hattler, Skirl and, later, Mini/BMW). Also, the MAX key art we created for this year’s conference comes from formal experimentation with three or four different programs. 

What do you most hope to be able to say about your work and your partnership 20 years from now?

Jan: That we constantly evolved, enjoyed life, and produced relevant work that inspired some to push harder. 

Hjalti: That I’m still very proud of the work we did, that Jan and I are still on speaking terms and, who knows, that the company is still going strong in 20 years, with the two of us working two days a week and an army of people doing all the work.

You and Hjalti have both been design judges… Do you feel that the work submitted to design competitions encapsulates what’s going on in the industry at the time?

For me, that’s a clear no. It might have been that way many years ago, but nowadays competitions are indicators of who wants to appeal to the commercial mainstream. The design world is more colorful now, and only a small fraction wants or needs to be represented in design annuals. We ourselves stopped sending things in about eight years ago. 

For your eleventh anniversary party you created a poster acknowledging all of the karlsssonwilker interns you’ve had over the years. How many were mentioned? And how many have been inspired, by working with you, to open their own studios?

We mentioned every single one of them—almost 40 interns have come through our little studio. About fifteen of them started their own studios more or less right after their time with us (I’m not sure that we inspired them to do that, I think they already came to us with that plan in mind).

Talent? Passion? Or education? Which is most important? Why?

Passion. For sure. A genuine interest in what you do is really all that matters. 

We just saw your version of the new MAX logo on the MAX website. Was executing a logo redesign easier or harder than beginning from scratch?

We didn’t see it as logo redesign, but as a demonstration of “creativity,” with the MAX logo incorporated into it. 

Be sure to come see karlssonwilker at Adobe MAX this year! Register at MAX.Adobe.com with promo code MXSM13 and save $300!

10:09 AM Permalink