Adobe Systems Incorporated

Singularity: The Evolution of Humanness

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Lucas Doerre, a 20-year-old designer from Hamburg, Germany was recently chosen to take part in Shutterstock’s Designer Passport tutorial series, to unveil the process behind his recent project—Singularity.

Lucas’s broadly-scoped representation of what it means to be human was created in Adobe Photoshop CC, with images from Shutterstock’s library. It defines the evolution of the human spirit, its transformation, evolution and growth. It’s a multi-tiered look at the process of growing into society while also maintaining singleness and individuality.

We asked Lucas to join us at HOW Design Live. He’ll be deconstructing Singularity in the Adobe booth on Wednesday May 14 at 12:30pm. We caught up with him a few days ago to get advance insight into what he’ll be talking about at HOW; read what he has to say about Photoshop CC’s Perspective Warp feature, Shutterstock’s “Find Similar Images” function, and the difficulty of visually defining human adaptability.


How were you selected to be a part of Designer Passport? Philippe Intraligi, design director at Shutterstock, was looking for a German designer for the Passport series. He found me through the Behance network, emailed me, and we chatted on Skype.

Have you ever thought of your digital project Singularity as an installation? Of actually building it? I was thinking of 3D printing it but there were some color issues—and unfortunately I don’t have access to a 3D printer. But it’s given me some ideas for future 3D printing projects that I definitely want to try, especially since Photoshop CC has 3D printing capability now.

Lucas_2Why or how did you choose the materials that the figure is passing through–the wood, the fire, the water? What do they symbolize? What do they mean to you? I chose them randomly, but they are intended to express the different phases and possibilities in a person’s lifetime.

Shutterstock has a huge (35 million+) image library, how did you choose the images in Singularity? I started with keywords that described the visual or the mood I was looking for and made good use of the “Find Similar Images” function.

Was this your first time using Photoshop CC’s Perspective Warp feature? Do you forsee using it in future projects? I had actually been experimenting with it prior to this project. It offers such a range of possibility; there’s so much that can be created with it.

What was the most difficult part of creating this project? The most difficult part was the beginning, I had an extremely detailed idea and was trying to realize it in so many ways but unfortunately no way seemed the “right” way. After some tries I got this idea to divide the whole image into sections. It became the foundation for the final artwork.

Lucas_3When you began documenting your process for Shutterstock did you see things in Singularity that you wish you’d done differently? Actually no. After so many attempts at starting this project I finally had a composition and a look that I really liked.

Have you experimented with other apps in Creative Cloud? Has having access to a variety of apps in Creative Cloud allowed you to experiment more? I’m loving the Typekit integration; it allows me to search new fonts in a extremely convenient way. And the ability to sync all my work to Behance and to have access to all my files in Creative Cloud are also very helpful.  I’ve also started using Adobe Illustrator CC; the features enable the creation of really interesting stuff.

We know project was created with Photoshop CC, but if you could use just one Creative Cloud application, which would it be? Why? It would be Photoshop CC. I love it. Some of my first works were created with Photoshop. It allows me to recreate and modify my images, type, whatever. And that’s what I’m doing… creating and modifying my ideas and visions. On a computer.

Follow us during HOW Design Live on Twitter and Facebook

9:46 AM Permalink

What’s New at Typekit

We’ve had a busy spring at Typekit; here’s a wrap-up of what’s new from the team:

Portfolio Plans with single-app Creative Cloud subscriptions

Many of you have decided that a single-app plan suits your needs better than the full Creative Cloud membership package, and that’s great—we don’t want that decision to limit your ability to use fonts from Typekit. So, Typekit’s excellent Portfolio Plan is now included with your single-app subscriptions, too; in our April 8 blog post we explain a few details about eligibility and getting started. We’re delighted to introduce even more of you to some great type!

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Customers with free plans can now sync desktop fonts

We’ve made a lot of noise about our feature for syncing Typekit fonts to your desktop, because, well, we’re pretty proud of it. We also feel that it’s become an essential part of the Creative Cloud service, and as such, want to give people the same risk-free chance to try it out before committing to a paid plan on Creative Cloud. So we’ve put together a selection of fonts that will be available for anyone to sync to their desktop—regardless of plan level. We took our time pulling this collection together; it includes winners like League Gothic and  Chaparral, and will give you the ability to fully explore what font syncing can do.

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The Typekit blog is brighter and broader

We’ve refreshed the look of our blog, and are also taking the occasion to publicly welcome our new team members from the Adobe Type and CoreType groups. We’re looking forward to hearing these new voices in future posts, with their expert-level commentary on topics like type technology and typeface design.

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Stay sharp with Typekit Practice

We’ve introduced a new resource to help people learn about typography. We call it Typekit Practice. We’ve just gotten started with a couple of lessons, but we’re excited to add to it and see how people use it. Have a look, and let us know what you’d like to learn about next.

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New fonts for desktop sync

We’ve added Mozilla’s Fira Sans and TypeTogether’s Alverata PE to our collection of fonts that are available for desktop sync. Make sure to check them out.

7:45 AM Permalink

Malcolm Gladwell, Stefan Sagmeister, and Adobe

HOW Design Live 2014: Five days of design; one extraordinary experience. Beginning with Malcolm Gladwell. Ending with Stefan Sagmeister. Adobe all the days in between.

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Malcolm Gladwell kicks things off

In a conversation with DeeDee Gordon, Malcolm Gladwell will kick-off HOW Design Live and set the tone for the conference. Drawing on history, politics and business, both past and present, his recent book David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants uncovers the forces that shape success. Its message—use what you’ve got—could be considered a rallying cry for designers to focus their energy, insight, and creativity in the face of bad briefs, difficult clients and creative blocks. Malcolm Gladwell takes the stage Monday May 12 at 4:15PM.
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Stefan Sagmeister wraps it up

Designer Stefan Sagmeister is devoting his closing keynote to topic of Design and Happiness. Sagmeister, founded his New York studio in 1993; when not designing, or teaching at New York’s School of Visual Arts, Sagmeister devotes time to understanding what makes his work successful and worthwhile. His work sparks curiosity, affects change and alters opinions and his insight into what it takes to be fulfilled, satisfied and, yes, “happy,” and to do work that’s meaningful and impactful provides a prompt to take breaks when necessary, generate ideas when there are no deadlines, and gather inspiration from every source. Don’t miss his talk Friday May 16 at 11:00AM.
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Adobe rounds things out

Adobe will be in the middle of things, throughout the conference, with a booth, product experts, and evangelist-led sessions. We’ll be teaching attendees about Creative Cloud, highlighting the newest features of our design tools, answering any and all product questions, and giving away prizes and chances to win Creative Cloud memberships. Most importantly, though, we’ll be showing how the tools in Creative Cloud can alter creative approaches, processes, and ultimately creative output.

Everyone knows it takes more than three to create a conference: A memorable event requires educational sessions and inspiring speakers and new insights into tools and techniques. HOW Design Live always has it all. So join us. Five days of design; one extraordinary experience. #AdobeHOW

Join us at HOW Design Live
Follow along on Twitter and Facebook

7:23 AM Permalink

Typekit: Extending Its Desktop Font Library to More Customers

TypekitBlog2 Starting today, all individual Creative Cloud members at all plan levels—including free trial memberships—will be able to sync fonts to their desktop applications. That means more than 130 great fonts to use in your favorite desktop apps, including Creative Cloud trial apps, older versions of the Creative Suite, and even non-Adobe applications.

 

Learn more about this collection of free desktop fonts and how to get started with Typekit on the Typekit blog.

From the League of Movable Type: League Gothic and Raleway; two typefaces available for desktop use from Typekit.

From the League of Movable Type: League Gothic and Raleway; two typefaces available for desktop use from Typekit.

 

9:30 AM Permalink

Adobe Creative Cloud: A Creative Advantage

Adobe Creative Cloud for teams standardizes a studio’s design workflow.

AppzStudio

AppStudioz is an innovative web and mobile application development company that specializes in developing applications for various platforms and devices including iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry, Windows, and Facebook. In just three years, the company has developed apps for diverse industry segments including healthcare, consumer and retail, gaming, augmented reality, and wearable computing.

Although the dynamics of such a nascent industry keep evolving, core app design remains at the heart of what AppStudioz does to deliver its services across the world. The company needed a platform that would enhance the creative ability of its design team and one that was easily scalable and agile. A cloud-based solution emerged as a default answer.

“When we started our cloud discussions, we did a lot of research and held extensive sessions with designers,” says Preeti Singh, vice president of technology at AppStudioz. “After careful deliberations, top management, designers, and the IT team collectively and unanimously decided to adopt Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.”

For AppStudioz, adopting Adobe solutions was a natural choice primarily because the platform is an industry standard and the firm was already using Adobe tools extensively—specifically Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Additionally, a majority of its clients based in the United States and the United Kingdom had already adopted Adobe Creative Cloud; using Adobe Creative Cloud for teams helps standardize the process for the company and its clients.

Broadening designer expertise
The migration to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams took two weeks and was completed without any work disruption. The Adobe team helped AppStudioz train designers and programmers on Creative Cloud tools. “The ease of use of all the components of Adobe Creative Cloud for teams allowed us to quickly train our team on these tools to deliver great results for clients,” says Singh.

AppStudioz works extensively in the area of scalable graphics and Adobe Creative Cloud tools, specifically Adobe Photoshop CC, come in very handy. Photoshop CC makes it easy for AppStudioz’s designers to customize vectors at any point in the design stage. For instance, previously, if there was a figure with four sharp edges and designers wanted to make those edges rounded, they had to remake the entire figure. With Photoshop CC, designers can bring in alterations at any stage. “Such innovative features have given our designers the power to create newer designs with ease and efficiency,” says Singh.

The design team at AppStudioz is a mix of graphic designers, illustrators, and user interface designers, all using different Creative Cloud tools. “Adobe Creative Cloud tools integrate flawlessly with each other, which lets our designers concentrate on the creative challenges before them and not get bogged down in the technology,” says Singh.

With Creative Cloud, AppStudioz designers can start creating images in Photoshop CC or Illustrator CC and later open them in Adobe Dreamweaver CC or Flash Professional CC. Further, the team can switch back-and-forth between the tools and experiment with designs to get different results. “The integration among the tools in Creative Cloud has gone a long way in making our workflows smoother,” says Singh.

Adobe Creative Cloud for teams enables the AppStudioz design teams to work and collaborate from anywhere in the world. Additionally, it has helped the firm’s designers to explore new approaches for designing and developing content delivered across various channels and devices. Migrating to Adobe Creative Cloud gives the creative team the flexibility to work effectively at any location and experiment with the latest tools to deliver content across platforms and devices with ease.

Raising productivity while lowering total cost of ownership
The streamlined administration in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams has greatly helped AppStudioz to eliminate time-consuming manual processes such as installing packaged software and maintaining version consistency. It has also helped raise productivity across the company by simplifying software administration with license management, automated tracking, and version upgrades.

For AppStudioz, Creative Cloud for teams membership has significantly reduced the total cost of ownership for Adobe solutions by creating a standardized model for purchasing and deploying the most current versions of Adobe Creative Cloud tools. “The predictable, easily managed membership model in Creative Cloud for teams eliminates having to deal with lump-sum software purchases,” says Singh. In addition, Adobe Creative Cloud helps support AppStudioz’s rapid growth and streamlines management of creative tools for designers.

“Our firm is continually growing and changing,” says Singh. “Adobe Creative Cloud for teams is helping us manage this growth and scale up rapidly by giving ready access to the latest creative tools to our designers.”

Read the AppStudioz case study.

7:10 AM Permalink

I AM THE NEW CREATIVE

Art directors are becoming animators. Print designers are becoming web designers. Illustrators are also photographers and editors who also shoot film. They are the New Creatives, and we are celebrating their work.

With the Creative Cloud our product teams have removed the barriers to creative expression: Designers can build parallax HTML5 experiences. Illustrators are making EPUBs. Photographers are using their cameras and Adobe technology to become filmmakers. And coders have the tools to make beautiful design.

It’s an amazing and interesting time in our industry; people have the ability to self-express, in any discipline, without boundaries. I Am The New Creative promotes the amazing work our community is producing and marks this moment in time as a movement and a celebration of creativity.

One of the most incredible aspects of this program has been watching creative professionals merge their mediums and their portraits to produce “New Creatives” versions of themselves.

There’s something magical about the compositions. As a designer there’s always a part of me in my work, but to personalize my work in this way, to make my work more representative of me, presents an alternative perspective. All of the artists we’re working with are enjoying this experience and are appreciative of our desire to promote their amazing creative output.

Our new site highlights the New Creatives, their disciplines, their work, and their stories.

Visitors to the site can join us and become New Creatives (submissions are made through Behance and curated by our team); we’ll be choosing a number of artists and celebrating them and their work throughout our social properties and on Adobe.com during the coming year.

 

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Be sure to check out the work of the New Creatives, get inspired, and join us.

AJ

Graphic Designer / Executive Creative Director / Maker of things

 

 

 

4:00 PM Permalink

Adobe Creative Cloud—A Platform for Innovation

In the spring of 2012, we launched Creative Cloud—membership to Adobe’s full range of creative applications—with the belief that it would benefit our customers by giving them access to our tools and services as they’re updated. Since then, more than 1.4 million people have joined Creative Cloud with premium (paid) memberships and millions more have signed up with (free) trial memberships.

Today we’re releasing a major update to Creative Cloud with new features across our core tools—Adobe® Photoshop® CC, Adobe® Illustrator® CC, and Adobe® InDesign® CC—including 3D printing support in Adobe Photoshop CC.

Photoshop CC expands creative possibilities

New 3D printing capabilities in Adobe Photoshop CC tap into the creative and commercial possibilities of 3D printing with the ability to reliably build, refine, preview, prepare and print 3D designs using familiar Photoshop tools. The groundbreaking Perspective Warp feature makes it easy to alter the viewpoint from which an object is seen, and manipulate perspective in an image, while keeping the rest of the image intact.  Linked Smart Objects save time and improve collaboration by enabling objects to be used and updated simultaneously across multiple Photoshop documents.  Learn about all the new features in Photoshop CC.

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Typekit revolutionizes how designers work with type

Now that you can sync fonts from Adobe Typekit to your computer for use in any desktop application, we’ve made updates to Illustrator CC and InDesign CC to make for an even more intuitive integration; for example, InDesign CC will now automatically search the Typekit desktop font library for missing fonts and offer the option to use those fonts, or similar fonts, if it finds a match. Using fonts in your PDFs and print files just got a lot easier. Learn more about Typekit.

Illustrator CC gets powerful new functionality

The latest version of Illustrator CC simplifies creating perfect, editable, rounded corners with the new Live Corners controls; offers more intuitive drawing with the rebuilt Pencil Tool; the ability to quickly modify existing objects and change the view of perspective drawings with Path Segment Reshape and export responsive SVG code and graphics. Learn more about Illustrator CC.

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InDesign CC simplifies ways to add interactivity

InDesign CC includes new support for EPUB 3.0 specification including new ways to add interactivity to eBooks, the ability to add pop-up footnotes that streamline the EPUB reading experience, and support for Japanese Vertical Composition and Hebrew and Arabic text. InDesign also offers simplified hyperlink creation and management. Learn more about InDesign CC.

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Adobe Muse CC gets more engaging

Adobe Muse CC released a set of new features in November 2013 that included scroll effect enhancements that make it easy to create subtle or dramatic scrolling web pages; a new Library panel that stores frequently used design elements; and a dozen new social widgets that make connecting to social media sites, like Facebook and Twitter, a snap. Also added was Adobe Muse Exchange, a community-based exchange where custom widgets and templates can be borrowed and shared. Learn more about Adobe Muse CC or check out How to Create a Website with Adobe Muse to create your first site.

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Get started with Creative Cloud

* If you’re ready to take your skills and creativity in new directions, with applications you’ve never tried before, check out the training videos on Creative Cloud Learn.

* If you’re already a Creative Cloud member, download the updates through the Creative Cloud desktop application.

* If you’re not yet a Creative Cloud member, sign up for a free trial membership for 30-day access to the latest versions of every Adobe creative desktop app.

* If you’ve already tried our Creative Cloud applications for 30 days, and want to try Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, InDesign CC or Muse CC a second time, free, launch the Creative Cloud desktop app and click Update next to the apps you want to try.

See, in more detail, what’s new in Creative Cloud for designers.

9:09 PM Permalink

It’s An Update: For Adobe Muse CC

Today, Adobe is happy to announce an update to Adobe Muse CC that makes it even easier to create unique HTML websites without writing code.

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Now designers can:

• Access the new Adobe Muse Exchange to download the more than 100 design elements that have been submitted by the Adobe Muse community, including starter templates, prototyping tools, interactive widgets, and more.

• Collect reusable design elements like icons, buttons, headers and footers, styles, and grids using the new Library panel, and share them with teams and other designers.

• Easily connect sites to social media with a dozen new drag-and-drop Social Widgets including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest buttons, plus Google Maps, and Vimeo and YouTube videos.

• Choose from even more scroll effects options from the updated Scroll Effects panel, including the ability to apply opacity and fading to scroll elements and add scroll effects to Adobe Edge animations and slideshows.

• Set a full-screen slideshow that adjusts to the width of the screen whether on desktop or a mobile device.

Get Started
This update is available to Creative Cloud members now: Simply open Adobe Muse and click Install Now from the updater screen. Then, check out the new training videos in Creative Cloud Learn to help you get started, also included with your membership at no additional cost.

Not yet a Creative Cloud member? Sign up for a free membership and get access to 30-day trials of every Adobe creative desktop app, including Adobe Muse. Free members also have access to the new training videos in Creative Cloud Learn to get started.

For a complete list of new features and updates, read the Adobe Muse CC Release Notes.

7:51 AM Permalink

Meet the New Creatives

Recently we launched a new campaign called “The New Creatives” which represents multi-skilled and diverse creative people who aren’t afraid to explore new mediums and go wherever their ideas take them. Over the past several weeks on our social channels, we’ve been featuring talented artists who identify as New Creatives.

In celebration of all the New Creatives out there, we commissioned artists from around the world to generate creative self-portraits and the results blew us away. Check out their works of art below.

Want to submit your own self-portrait? Share it on Behance using the hashtag #NewCreatives or post it to our Facebook wall for a chance to be featured.

ANITA FONTAINE    

ARTIST/HACKER/MAXIMALIST

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JOSHUA DAVIS    

ILLUSTRATOR/CODER/MAGICIAN

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JEREMY FISH    

ARITST/ILLUSTRATOR/MAKER OF STUFF

Jeremy Fish

 

MITCHELL VIZENSKY    

ILLUSTRATOR / CHARACTER DESIGNER / ANIMATOR

Michell Viznesky copy

 

DYLAN ROSCOVER   

ILLUSTRATOR / ANIMATOR / EMOTIVE

Dylan Roscover

 

ALEJANDRO CHAVETTA    

DESIGNER / COORDINATOR / PRINT AFICIONADO

Alejandro Chavetta

 

VIET HUYNH    

ART DIRECTOR / DESIGNER / TYPOGRAPHER

VietHuynh-Portrait

 

Thanks to all of our contributing New Creatives!

Continue to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to see more great work from the New Creatives.

11:00 AM Permalink

Behance Creative Spotlight: Steve Simpson

Dublin-based illustrative designer Steve Simpson caught our attention with his whimsical approach to animal illustrations in the menu created for his client Fade Street Social. Learn more about his workspace, favorite Creative Cloud features, and how he created this work in the Q&A below:

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What are you working on now?

I’m currently designing and illustrating a label for my favourite Irish whiskey. Can’t spill anymore about this one, except to say it’s a lot of fun with hand drawn type. I’m just finishing thirty 1 inch monsters for a ten foot roll of stickers for a client in New York, which will be great preparation for my next job; a 400 meter long mural. Thankfully, it will be done digitally and not on site.

What’s your dream project?

I really like a mix of illustration and design in a project; I love the control you have as an illustrator when you’re also doing the graphic design part of the project. There can sometimes, as an illustrator, be a tendency to create a piece that will primarily look great outside the context of the design; for instance in the portfolio. If the designer is also trying to create something that will stand alone, the whole design doesn’t exactly gel.  As an illustrative designer, you can get a much better harmony, with neither side fighting for centre stage. (I’m starting to sound like an old hippie.)

I’m really enjoying packaging projects at the moment, so perhaps a beer label, tea or biscuits would be a fun project to work on.

What does your workspace look like…is it your personal studio, or a neighborhood coffee shop?

I work from a studio, but at the moment I probably have more used coffee cups than the neighborhood coffee shop. It’s a typical cluttered working studio, think less Zen, more punk DIY, but with wifi. I have a room to myself (usually) with a couple of tables, a light-box, iMac and piles and piles of paper. I sketch a lot, constantly (and quickly) redrawing ideas until I’ve exhausted as many options as possible. I hate it when a better idea comes to you when you’ve nearly finished the project, so I try to go through as many options as quickly as possible. Which does create a mountain of roughs and tidying at least twice a year.

Do you share your workspace with anybody? Furry friends count.

I’m saying goodbye to my summer intern Nikkie (Little Paper Forest), who’s off to finish her degree in Illustration back in Canada. In the garret there’s a web designer and another design/illustrator, a couple of Irish guys. It’s good to have somebody to talk ideas through with sometimes. I also like to have an occasional moan, which isn’t the same when you’re on your own.

How has the Creative Cloud changed your creative workflow?

I’ve been using Photoshop since about 1993/94 and it probably accounts for around 90% of my digital day. Other day-to-day essentials include: InDesign, Illustrator and Acrobat. I love exploring new stuff, seeing how it can add something different to what I’m already doing. Having all of the Adobe Creative Cloud apps available to download is very exciting. Currently looking forward to playing around with After Effects CC. Also loving the CC desktop client. Very cool being able to see updates as they become available and so simple to update.

What tools specific to Creative Cloud enable you to work more efficiently?

Really loving the hook up with Behance. I like to put some of my projects on my Behance work-in-progress page, great for instant feedback. The ability to do this straight from Photoshop CC is very cool and prevents me getting sidetracked by other online distractions.

What was the initial ask for this project?

I first met the client, Dylan McGrath, with the Creative Director Gary Gleeson, when we sat down in a Dublin bar to discuss the Fade Street Social menu cover. The building was still being renovated at the time. Dylan wanted a busy kitchen environment that reflected not just his own personal attention to detail but also the humor of the Irish. As a nation we’ve been through a torrid time lately with the rise and fall of the Celtic tiger economy and we appear to be going through a period of reflection; rediscovering what it is to be Irish. I think what Dylan is doing reflects this. It’s about quality traditional foodstuffs in a modern changing Ireland. It’s presented with creativity and flair and a touch of Irish humour. That’s pretty much what the cover needed to reflect.

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How did the client’s vision match up to your execution?

Initially there were to be humans in the kitchen, but I thought it would work better with animals, so I took the food from the menu and made them the kitchen staff. As I’m drawing them they naturally develop as characters and by the time I’m finished often, privately, have quite elaborative back-stories. I think Dylan may have asked for one of the speech bubbles to be changed but otherwise they went with my initial pencil sketch. We printed a large tryptic version that is behind the reception when you enter and you can really see the detail when blown up. They were very happy.

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Did you look at real animals for inspiration?

In my initial sketches I try to work without any reference material. I want to get as much of what I see in my mind down on paper. I try not to worry about whether a sheep looks exactly like a sheep at the early stages, it’s really not important. If the wooly beast is right for the space, if he has a good shape, if he is working well with the environment, if I’m happy, only then will I go and find reference material to make him more ‘sheeply’ accurate. If you look at the sheep in the centre, I think it’s his eye that really gives him his personality. If I hadn’t gone off and found photo reference then he would probably have just had a round dot for a pupil.

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Where did some of the personalities come from for these animals?

I guess they are all either people I know or me, mostly they are me at the beginning and my different moods, but they change and develop into their own personalities the more I work into them. I did feature Dylan in the design, he has a chicken on his head. Vincent was the money man, he’s featured on a bottle of vino on the left.

Which animal is your favorite? And why?

I like Angus the bull, who was always called Angus, but the day before I handed the final artwork in I just happened to watch a documentary on cattle that mentioned Angus bulls were all black, and my Angus wasn’t, he was a really nice black and white. So I had to reluctantly change him. Looking back I think being black really makes him. I guess this proves that I don’t use photo reference as much as I should. :) 

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Thanks again to Steve Simpson for answering our questions and giving us insight into his illustrative design process. For more inspiration, be sure to keep in touch with Creative Cloud on Facebook and Twitter.

9:00 AM Permalink