Adobe Systems Incorporated

I AM THE NEW CREATIVE

Art directors are becoming animators. Print designers are becoming web designers. Illustrators are also photographers and editors who also shoot film. They are the New Creatives, and we are celebrating their work.

With the Creative Cloud our product teams have removed the barriers to creative expression: Designers can build parallax HTML5 experiences. Illustrators are making EPUBs. Photographers are using their cameras and Adobe technology to become filmmakers. And coders have the tools to make beautiful design.

It’s an amazing and interesting time in our industry; people have the ability to self-express, in any discipline, without boundaries. I Am The New Creative promotes the amazing work our community is producing and marks this moment in time as a movement and a celebration of creativity.

One of the most incredible aspects of this program has been watching creative professionals merge their mediums and their portraits to produce “New Creatives” versions of themselves.

There’s something magical about the compositions. As a designer there’s always a part of me in my work, but to personalize my work in this way, to make my work more representative of me, presents an alternative perspective. All of the artists we’re working with are enjoying this experience and are appreciative of our desire to promote their amazing creative output.

Our new site highlights the New Creatives, their disciplines, their work, and their stories.

Visitors to the site can join us and become New Creatives (submissions are made through Behance and curated by our team); we’ll be choosing a number of artists and celebrating them and their work throughout our social properties and on Adobe.com during the coming year.

 

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Be sure to check out the work of the New Creatives, get inspired, and join us.

AJ

Graphic Designer / Executive Creative Director / Maker of things

 

 

 

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Adobe Creative Cloud—A Platform for Innovation

In the spring of 2012, we launched Creative Cloud—membership to Adobe’s full range of creative applications—with the belief that it would benefit our customers by giving them access to our tools and services as they’re updated. Since then, more than 1.4 million people have joined Creative Cloud with premium (paid) memberships and millions more have signed up with (free) trial memberships.

Today we’re releasing a major update to Creative Cloud with new features across our core tools—Adobe® Photoshop® CC, Adobe® Illustrator® CC, and Adobe® InDesign® CC—including 3D printing support in Adobe Photoshop CC.

Photoshop CC expands creative possibilities

New 3D printing capabilities in Adobe Photoshop CC tap into the creative and commercial possibilities of 3D printing with the ability to reliably build, refine, preview, prepare and print 3D designs using familiar Photoshop tools. The groundbreaking Perspective Warp feature makes it easy to alter the viewpoint from which an object is seen, and manipulate perspective in an image, while keeping the rest of the image intact.  Linked Smart Objects save time and improve collaboration by enabling objects to be used and updated simultaneously across multiple Photoshop documents.  Learn about all the new features in Photoshop CC.

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Typekit revolutionizes how designers work with type

Now that you can sync fonts from Adobe Typekit to your computer for use in any desktop application, we’ve made updates to Illustrator CC and InDesign CC to make for an even more intuitive integration; for example, InDesign CC will now automatically search the Typekit desktop font library for missing fonts and offer the option to use those fonts, or similar fonts, if it finds a match. Using fonts in your PDFs and print files just got a lot easier. Learn more about Typekit.

Illustrator CC gets powerful new functionality

The latest version of Illustrator CC simplifies creating perfect, editable, rounded corners with the new Live Corners controls; offers more intuitive drawing with the rebuilt Pencil Tool; the ability to quickly modify existing objects and change the view of perspective drawings with Path Segment Reshape and export responsive SVG code and graphics. Learn more about Illustrator CC.

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InDesign CC simplifies ways to add interactivity

InDesign CC includes new support for EPUB 3.0 specification including new ways to add interactivity to eBooks, the ability to add pop-up footnotes that streamline the EPUB reading experience, and support for Japanese Vertical Composition and Hebrew and Arabic text. InDesign also offers simplified hyperlink creation and management. Learn more about InDesign CC.

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Adobe Muse CC gets more engaging

Adobe Muse CC released a set of new features in November 2013 that included scroll effect enhancements that make it easy to create subtle or dramatic scrolling web pages; a new Library panel that stores frequently used design elements; and a dozen new social widgets that make connecting to social media sites, like Facebook and Twitter, a snap. Also added was Adobe Muse Exchange, a community-based exchange where custom widgets and templates can be borrowed and shared. Learn more about Adobe Muse CC or check out How to Create a Website with Adobe Muse to create your first site.

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Get started with Creative Cloud

* If you’re ready to take your skills and creativity in new directions, with applications you’ve never tried before, check out the training videos on Creative Cloud Learn.

* If you’re already a Creative Cloud member, download the updates through the Creative Cloud desktop application.

* If you’re not yet a Creative Cloud member, sign up for a free trial membership for 30-day access to the latest versions of every Adobe creative desktop app.

* If you’ve already tried our Creative Cloud applications for 30 days, and want to try Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, InDesign CC or Muse CC a second time, free, launch the Creative Cloud desktop app and click Update next to the apps you want to try.

See, in more detail, what’s new in Creative Cloud for designers.

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Adobe InDesign CC Update: Sync Settings between Computers

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The first application update since the June release of InDesign CC enables people to synchronize preferences—keyboard shortcuts, presets and workspaces—to Creative Cloud.

Settings That Go Where You Go

Anyone who uses one computer at home and another at work can Sync Settings to save their preferences; whenever/wherever InDesign is opened, the settings will be the same.

 

 

Learn more about InDesign CC on the InDesign product page on Adobe.com.

1:39 PM Permalink

Adobe & Sundance 2013

The video team is proud to partner with the Sundance Film Festival again in 2013. Many films across the festival incorporated Adobe tools into their workflows but the most exciting news from the festival this year was the four films in the festival that were cut exclusively using Premiere Pro [C.O.G, We Are What We Are, Feral and When Zombies Come]. Two of those production teams couldn’t say enough about the benefits of Adobe Creative Cloud membership to their independent filmmaking process. Through their Creative Cloud memberships they used Adobe creative tools for everything from cutting, scoring and creating motion graphics for their films with Premiere Pro, After Effects and Audition, to creating and sharing promotional materials like posters and flyers using Photoshop, InDesign and Acrobat.

In addition to the exciting news from the filmmaking side of Sundance, Adobe also has great presence around Park City as part of the festival. The Adobe panel, “From Script to Screen, the Fusion of Technology and Storytelling in Film” features three luminary Adobe video customers- Tyler Nelson [Assistant Editor – House of Cards, Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Social Network], Bill Yukich [Commercial/music video editor - Coca–Cola, Volvo, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Adam Lambert] and Bayan Joonam [Head of Production at SoulPancake, actor Rainn Wilson's production company]. Adobe is also hosting a space in the Filmmakers Co-op where festival attendees are able to sign up for Free Creative Cloud memberships and learn all the great features of Adobe Creative Cloud, Premiere Pro and all the Adobe video tools.

Adobe continues to strengthen our partnerships with HP and RED.  Premiere Pro Product Manager, Al Mooney, joined representatives from HP and RED as part of the HP Panel, “4K and Beyond: The evolving role of technology in digital filmmaking”.  And HP will host the Main St. Sundance House where numerous HP systems were loaded with Adobe Creative Cloud and filmmakers could come, learn more about Adobe software and print out high quality copies of their marketing materials to aid them in building buzz around their films throughout bustling Park City.

2013 is going to be a huge year for the Adobe video team and Sundance is the perfect place to kick off all the great things to come!

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7:34 AM Permalink

No App Is an Island

While you may have one favorite Adobe app, I’ll bet you’ve also used them together in combinations: for example, placing a layered Photoshop file in InDesign to take advantage of the flexible Layer Comps feature.

Adobe’s “No App Is an Island” contest challenged participants to describe your own multiple-product workflows. We recently chose the winners, and they’re a great cross-section of how today’s creatives make the most of our software.

For example, Theo Lipfert, an award-winning filmmaker and associate Professor in the School of Film and Photography at Montana State University, demonstrated how he combines Illustrator and After Effects to create animations that can range from simple to sophisticated:

For his video tutorial, Professor Lipfert goes home with the Grand Prize: a year’s subscription to the Creative Cloud.

Another winning how-to, by Howard Pinsky, used Lightroom and Photoshop to create a high-dynamic range photo with rich detail in the shadows and highlights:

The remaining winners are Jason Anderson (“Complete Map-Making Workflow”), Sara Frances (“Photo Effects and Filters”), Mike Gentilini (“Customizable Twitter and Facebook Logo Videos”), Kirk Nelson (“Create Cool Pie Charts”), and Kelly Vaughn (“Acrobat Highlighters that Don’t Require Recognizable Text”). Theo Lipfert was also recognized for two other entries: “Using Lightroom as a CinemaDNG importer for After Effects” and “CinemaDNG Round Tripping Between After Effects and Premiere Pro”.

In the coming year, look for all of the tutorials to appear in several places across Adobe. But in the meantime, anyone interested in cross-product how-to’s should download issue 2 of Adobe SWAPP, a free iPad publication. Every article in issue 2 (created by such experts as Von Glitschka, Ben Willmore, and David Blatner) is a multi-product goldmine.

Thank you to all the contest participants, and a big congratulations to the winners!

11:11 AM Permalink

Top 5 Creative Cloud Tips (and Benefits) from Dave Cross

Dave-CrossOur team noticed Photoshop trainer, author, speaker and photographer, Dave Cross (@DaveCross) sharing Creative Cloud tips on Twitter, so we tapped him to see if he’d be up for sharing his insights with our Creative Layer readers. Dave told us that in the relatively short time that he’s been an Adobe Creative Cloud member, he’s already benefited in some unexpected ways, and continues to see additional opportunities where he can take advantage of Creative Cloud features. Here are Dave’s top 5 Creative Cloud tips (and really some benefits), written by the pro himself:

Tip #1: Apps

Of course, having access to all the Adobe applications is pretty sweet. But there’s a “hidden” benefit: Adobe Creative Cloud members get access to new features before they are released to everyone else. There have already been exclusive new features added to Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Muse and more, and I expect that will continue in the future with other apps.  

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5:48 PM Permalink

Acrobat XI is Here and Coming Soon to Creative Cloud

We’re happy to announce  Acrobat XI., which will soon be available for Creative Cloud members.  Acrobat XI eliminates inefficiencies in the conversion between document formats and makes documents flow more smoothly between users. For creative pros, a newly added feature enables users to mark up and annotate PDFs on tablets and smartphones, so you can easily work on the go. Along with the extensive editing systems and the expanded security within the program, there are a host of new additions that make this the most comprehensive version to date and the friendliest to the freelancer or on-to-go designer.

Easily Edit PDFs

It is easier than ever to edit existing text and images, in addition to preserving reflow of text and saving time. And do it on the go, with the ability edit PDFs on tablets and smartphones.

Export to PowerPoint

Save significant time reusing existing slides in PDF format with the seamless transitions that Acrobat XI provides.

Get Signoff Electronically

Through integration with Adobe EchoSign, the signing and approval process is simplified and more transparent, making it easy to get projects kicked off.

End-to-end Web and PDF Form Design, Distribution, Data Collection and Analysis Workflows

Adobe FormsCentral and the FormsCentral desktop app via the cloud integrates with Acrobat XI Pro and streamlines client service request forms, customer surveys, online ordering, and more. Use existing PDF forms – such as those created in InDesign CS6 – start from scratch or take advantage of convenient templates.

Customize Your UI

Acrobat XI Pro UI can be fully customized through custom tool sets, allowing users to customize the toolbar and Tools pane with only the tools they need specifically for their work. These tools can also be organized and categorized with user preferences in mind.

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Learn more at Adobe.com and get started on making your workflow FLOW.

2:17 PM Permalink

Creative Spotlight: Q&A with Animator Lee Daniels

You may have stumbled across Lee Daniels’ work on our Adobe Stories site or our Adobe Facebook Page, but we recently caught up with him to really find out the depths and origins of his creativity when it comes to animation and cartooning.

Adobe: What’s your story? How did you get to where you are today?

Lee Daniels: After experiencing a lack of support for cartooning in grammar school, I decided to get a job in graphic design rather than University education. I got to learn all the Adobe software by trial and error in a real world environment on company hardware, which was always better than what I could afford at the time. I then became a digital retouch artist and graphic designer for a magazine publishing firm for 13 years after leaving school. Since then, I’ve been working as a freelance illustrator in London for almost 4 years (8 including the crossover with my last design job).

leedanielsart-300x212What was it about animation that got your attention? 

Cartoons like Wile E. Coyote and Tom and Jerry. I always saw the levels of creativity, invention and escapism in cartoons as light-years ahead of the live action drip-feed in to our living room for the other 95% of viewing time.

Cartoons have always been generally viewed as childish because of the history in kids TV, which is why I like to use the medium to create work that is not necessarily childish – without taking it too far of course, that’s the job of South Park.

Inspiration: Is it easy to come by for you or is it a rare pearl? How do you find it?

My previous videos include everything from the misfortune of frogs, though triumphant hamsters, to incompetent Secret Service agents and intelligence tests for a reluctant chimp. Although there is no overriding theme to all, I would have to highlight the common thread as the success of seemingly inferior beings over their seemingly superior tormentors. So inspiration for this can be found pretty much anywhere and tends to come fairly easily. I’ve usually got about 2-3 ideas for future shorts in mind while working on any one project.


lee-daniels-art-212x300Do you believe in creative blocks?  How do you push through them?

Yes, absolutely. Although this is almost impossible to do, I find the best way to get through a potential day-spoiler is to just drop everything, stop working and go for a run. Admittedly this is much easier to do now that I’m working for myself – leaving an employment situation in this fashion would be frowned-upon at best! The only real escape to freedom during a creative block in my old job was a trip to the coffee machine the long way round, which was not very inspiring.

What’s your go-to product within the Adobe Creative Suite? Why?

This may sound like a cop-out answer but my go to product is the Creative Suite. I like to view it as one playground. More specifically, if I’m static illustrating or cartooning, it would be a mixture of Illustrator and Photoshop. If I’m animating it would be the previous two plus After Effects, Premiere Pro and Soundbooth. If I’m doing a graphic design job it would be Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. But generally, whatever project I’m working on, I can guarantee to be pressing Apple + Tab multiple times throughout. I’ve downloaded free trials of a lot of different software over the years, but nothing comes close to Adobe in my opinion. I treated myself to the Master Collection after leaving my job to go freelance, and I wouldn’t change it for anything else.

What was your favorite project you worked on while using Adobe Creative Suite?

My most recent work ‘Jungle Brawl‘ is definitely my proudest achievement so far. I made a decision early on not to cut any corners when creating the background artwork and even playing the music myself on guitar as opposed to ‘loops’ (apart from the drum loops, which I don’t play). Previously, I’ve concentrated my efforts mainly on the characters, but I spent a lot of sleepless nights storyboarding, painting the rainforest environment and thinking of new ways to shoot the scenes in an attempt to keep up the filmic quality.

I utilized all the major Creative Suite applications during production – as you’ll see from the credits – and After Effects is definitely the star of the show, although heavily backed-up by Photoshop and Illustrator. After Effects is an incredibly powerful cartoon animating tool and I’m pleased to be championing its use for this medium.

Who are your creative role models?

Stylistically, I take inspiration from hundreds of undiscovered creatives in my online networks. Inspiration from more publicly known artists and companies would be some of the more obvious: Frank Miller, Jamie Hewlett, Patrick Brown, Dave Gibbons, Pixar, Warner Brothers.

If you could give one piece of advice to a new animator/artist starting out, what would it be?

Learn the software and practice, practice, practice. Every piece of software I’ve used has been predominantly learned by trial and error. I find that pure experimentation throws up unexpected problems and only deepens your knowledge in the long run by forcing you to learn what NOT to do.

To find out more about Lee’s upcoming work, you can follow him on Twitter @LeeDanielsART.

6:00 AM Permalink

Introducing the Creative Cloud

We change the way we work about once a decade. Back in the ’80s, the introduction of desktop publishing caused a profound shift in the way we communicated with each other. Ten years later, the web changed all that again. In the last decade, we’ve learned that the web isn’t just a publishing platform, but also a way to amplify our relationships with one another. We’ve embraced social networking tools as an organizing principle.

What will this decade hold? The recent wave of touch-based devices has opened our eyes to what’s possible when we step away from a keyboard and mouse. And it’s not just a new way of interacting with a screen, but a new way of thinking about technology. In a world driven by publishing, files and folders made a lot of sense. In today’s world, where we use multiple devices every day that are always connected, we have a new metaphor: the cloud.

Changes Ahead

To say that the Creative Cloud represents a big change for Adobe is a dramatic understatement. Every part of this company is rethinking what it means to solve problems for our customers and give them the tools and services to create amazing things. Although I’ve only been at Adobe a few months, it’s been remarkable to see so many people embrace so much change. (Honestly, I’m having a blast.)

So let me take a moment to explain what we’ve been up to and where we’re heading. Everything stems from two core beliefs. First, the way in which all of us acquire and manage our software is changing. Waiting a couple of years for updates to our tools is no longer tenable for many users. Our relationship to our software is more like that of a service: continuous improvements through frequent iteration. Second, it’s clear that devices like the iPad are not just for consuming content, but represent the next wave of tools for the creation of content as well. And these new capabilities need tools that have been completely reconsidered. Simple ports of desktop apps won’t do.

Everything you need

To support these new expectations from our customers, we’ve taken some dramatic steps.

A Creative Cloud membership starts with the complete Creative Suite 6 — full, installable versions of the desktop apps. We’ve added Adobe Muse, our new visual web design tool, and Edge, the HTML5 animation app. To this, we added a lot of services such as Business Catalyst for web hosting, Typekit for fonts, and up to 20 gigabytes of cloud storage for syncing and sharing your files. Then, we connected these pieces to help you go from idea to finished product, starting with web site creation and soon, we’ll add access to our iPad publishing service for making digital editions of things like magazines and catalogs via  InDesign.

But perhaps the most exciting news is that we’ve made all of this available at an accessible monthly price. Yes, that gets you everything.

With so much software and so many services available to everyone, we took a step back and re-imagined the way we get that software to you. The Adobe Application Manager offers a single-click process for downloading and installing, which feels — frankly — a lot more like the app stores we use every day. And you can manage all of that software with your AdobeID: no more searching for serial numbers — just log in once with your email address and password.

Connected through the Web

All of this is tied together with the website at http://creativecloud.com/. We’ve built a clear overview of everything you get with your membership, as well as a central place to manage all your stored and shared files. But we didn’t just build a fancy file browser — there are plenty of services that let you store files online and view them on the web. Rather, we realized we could differentiate with our intimate knowledge of our file formats. Nobody knows Adobe software better than Adobe. Push a Photoshop file to the cloud, and we’ll parse the layers and color pallet, plus give you tools for sharing, leaving comments, and translating to other formats. Same goes for all our other files — easily page through large InDesign files, view the fonts in your Illustrator docs, and on and on.

We’re also rolling out a set of four touch apps for the iPad today: Photoshop Touch for pixel-level image editing and layering, Ideas for vector-based sketching, Proto for creating website wireframes, and Collage for moodboard layouts. Each of these is tightly connected with our cloud-based storage, meaning every file you create and every change you make is quickly accessible across other devices and the web. You can buy these touch apps at your device’s app store, and we’ll give you a free month of membership when you connect them to the Creative Cloud.

I hope I’ve given you a sense for the journey we’re on. It really is just the beginning, and I’ll be following up with a post on our immediate roadmap outlining all the new things that are coming in the next few weeks. If you’d like to keep up with it all, you can follow this blog, or connect with us on Twitter or Facebook. Of course, we’d like to hear from you as well, so please don’t hesitate to tell us what you think.

We’ve worked really hard on all of this, and we’re really happy with the results. I hope you are as well.

— Jeffrey Veen & the Creative Cloud Team

Jeff is the Senior Director of Products, Creative Cloud. He joined Adobe through the acquisition of Typekit, where he was co-founder and CEO. Read more about Jeff in his bio.

9:01 PM Permalink

Creative Cloud and CS6 Ask a Pro Sessions

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With the arrival of Creative Cloud and CS6 just around the corner, we wanted to give our Fans and Followers a first-hand look at some of the new features they can expect! We’ve put together a schedule of 10 Ask a Pro sessions with details below.

Whether you’re into graphic design, web design and development, video production and/or photography, there’s a little something for everyone! Just remember to register for the sessions of interest. (more…)

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